Emigration: Australia & New Zealand

web

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Thank you for this!
If you are unsure phone immigration new zealand they are super helpful and it's well worth the phone call. There are immigration agents who will advise you on what to do. The costs for a consultation could save you a fortune if you make a mistake.
 

JacquesZA

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If you are unsure phone immigration new zealand they are super helpful and it's well worth the phone call. There are immigration agents who will advise you on what to do. The costs for a consultation could save you a fortune if you make a mistake.
Thank you, will definitely do this.
 

marco79

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Costs are all on INZ website, https://www.nzqa.govt.nz/qualifications-standards/international-qualifications/pre-assessment-result/ do a pre assessment first. You will probably need a full assessment later on
Thanks, this is exactly what I'm looking for.

A colleague is starting in NZ on 2 Spetember. I'll have a chat to him later or tomorrow (his last day in the office) a bit more in detail about his application. I had a quick discussion with him last week.

He applied for a Skilled Migrant Visa, which he says is valid for 30 months, and after being in NZ for 24 months, he could apply for Permanent Residency. He initially wanted to go to Australia and followed all the steps as detailed here. Done his English tests, send his qualifications and experience for verification, and was actively looking for employment for 6 months in Aus & NZ. He had numerous telephonic and skype interviews, and as soon as he stopped looking, he received a call from a NZ company.

He received an offer for employment early July for starting 2 Sept. His police clearance took 9 weeks. Only received it on Thursday last week. He sent in his Visa application Thursday night.

He was telling me that his scoring for PR would be better after having worked in NZ for 2 years, and that the Skilled Migrant route was alot quicker, and cheaper.
 

web

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Thanks, this is exactly what I'm looking for.

A colleague is starting in NZ on 2 Spetember. I'll have a chat to him later or tomorrow (his last day in the office) a bit more in detail about his application. I had a quick discussion with him last week.

He applied for a Skilled Migrant Visa, which he says is valid for 30 months, and after being in NZ for 24 months, he could apply for Permanent Residency. He initially wanted to go to Australia and followed all the steps as detailed here. Done his English tests, send his qualifications and experience for verification, and was actively looking for employment for 6 months in Aus & NZ. He had numerous telephonic and skype interviews, and as soon as he stopped looking, he received a call from a NZ company.

He received an offer for employment early July for starting 2 Sept. His police clearance took 9 weeks. Only received it on Thursday last week. He sent in his Visa application Thursday night.

He was telling me that his scoring for PR would be better after having worked in NZ for 2 years, and that the Skilled Migrant route was alot quicker, and cheaper.
There are various different ways for NZ. Points, accredited employers and work to residence. Just do the research and don't give up. The biggest issue is normally the dreaded " must have new zealand experience"
 

reactor_sa

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No, meaning the company “sponsors “ the visa by giving a job offer.
They don’t pay for it but they give you a job. I:e i don’t have a visa before getting the job.
I don't know about that, the work visas like the old 457 were fully sponsored by companies. They were a lot more than skilled independent like 189 and 190.
 

reactor_sa

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controversial question here...
How many of you applied for a bunch of credit cards to get over initially... ? feel free to PM if you don't want it public,

really curious as to the routes people took financially especially if the move came faster than expected.
Good luck without a local address and income history.
 

Mystic Twilight

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controversial question here...
How many of you applied for a bunch of credit cards to get over initially... ? feel free to PM if you don't want it public,

really curious as to the routes people took financially especially if the move came faster than expected.
Nothing controversial, unless you intend to not pay back the money.
 

^^vampire^^

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No it's not illegal, you need to be honest with immigration when coming over. Set up interviews and appointments first and make sure you put that in your visitors visa application. It's illegal to work not look for work but be honest.
This is not technically true/false per se. Both Australia and New Zealand visitors visa's state that you may attend interviews on a visitors visa but if attending interviews on your tourist visa is your primary concern then it is illegal. You actually have to come and do touristy things, spend in the ANZ economy and then you may attend an interview. Over and above that it is illegal for a company to offer you a job unless you have a work or PR visa (rights to work in ANZ).

The easiest route if you want to go down this path would probably be coming for a holiday, having an interview set up and it being with a company that would be willing to sponsor. If a company is not willing to sponsor you would be wasting your time unless they are willing to wait for to go back home and apply for a work visa. The fact of the matter though is if you fly in, have an AirBNB booked for a handful of days and then flying out again that will look suspicious (especially if in bigger cities), they will follow up, and if you get caught out you get banned from coming back for many years or permanently.

I know these are all small technicalities but it helps to have the facts and to conduct yourself appropriately within the laws defined. Chances are slim that you would get caught if you deviate but if you happen to be the person they decide to follow up on and investigate then you become the horror story for everyone else to use as a case study.
 

^^vampire^^

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controversial question here...
How many of you applied for a bunch of credit cards to get over initially... ? feel free to PM if you don't want it public,

really curious as to the routes people took financially especially if the move came faster than expected.
Would be a stupid thing to do. One cannot close accounts that aren't paid up. That would mean not being able to financially emigrate to cash in RAs and the like.
If you're not planning on paying them back then it's a terrible idea. If things don't work out and you have to return to SA then you are screwed. You may have the intention of paying back the cards but there are also risks associated with that. If you rack up a huge amount of debt and you don't land a job in Aus soon then you may struggle or never be able to pay those cards back and again you're in a really bad situation. If you're happy with those risks then go ahead, know what you're getting yourself into but personally I'm against it on many levels.

You must also take into account that it's not just visa application costs you need to pay for but all the things that go with the application (agent fees, medicals, english test, procuring documents, getting your qualifications and skills assessed, police clearance) and then the actual moving costs (selling house if you have and all associated costs, transferring belongings overseas, paying for flights, paying for passport, getting unabridged certs etc etc etc) and then the cost of being this side and not having a job (accommodation - rental is usually $300-$500+ per week, AirBNB and cheap hotels usually $100 a night, food, travel, groceries, cell phone so you have email and phone number, cost to change drivers licence). Alot of these costs add up to mega bucks when all put together and converted to rand.

You also need to weigh up other things. You may think because you are coming to Aus and your salary may double (rand wise) you will be better off but you are still spending and buying in AUD and it takes a while to normalise (learn prices, learn how to get good deals, learn what your monthly expenses are etc). It's hard to say exactly what someones lifestyle and spending habits would be here and to be honest I feel that if you aren't saving in South Africa then you probably won't be saving here either; it's a lifestyle choice more than a surplus choice in many cases.
To give some examples: I used to go drinking every weekend in SA, in Aus I go maybe once of twice a year. A beer out is generally around the $10 mark for the cheap stuff and you can easily drop $500 or well over on a good night out. A friend of mine likes to buy people shots etc when we do birthdays etc and usually spends about $1500 on a proper night out which is ridiculous and in comparison that would be about a R2000-R4000 night in SA. I used to eat out all the time in SA with my GF and we would generally go for steak or similar meals costing around the R100 mark. Generally the cheapest steak meal you can find here is $30 with the average being $35-$45. That means a meal in SA with a drink each would be R250 while that translates to around $90-$100 here (roughly R900-R1000). Car registration costs about R700-R1000 yearly in SA. My last rego here was $900. That means at a minimum you are paying 9 times more in Aus than in SA or R9000 yearly for a single car licence. Other things like cigarettes - $40+ (R400+) per box, 10 year drivers licence - $277 (R2770). Maid or Gardener - $40 p/h (R400 p/h)

Other things to note is that they tend to try screw people on pay with saying you don't have Aus experience. From many saffers I've spoken to ryanrich's situation is not nearly the norm. If you expect to earn $80k a year expect an offer of $60k or maybe $70k. For my skill level all indications pointed to my salary being $120k. I was only offered in the region of $100k and only after fighting to get it raised from initial offers of $90k. It's higher now but I've worked my butt off to get it there but in the beginning you have to take the knock and then work hard to up it as quickly as possible. Also remember that usually salaries offered include superannuation (mandatory retirement). This means that you knock 9.5% off what you expect to get from the beginning. Yeah it's great that money is put towards your retirement but it catches people off guard when doing their financial planning.

My point being that if you move here and want all the trappings in life that people enjoy in SA but you can't afford to save now, you may struggle here and then be screwed and can't pay those cards back.
 
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ryanrich

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Yeah I must say I would also be weary about assuming you can tell them you will be attending interviews. I personally know of a guy who in 2008/2009 when I was over there was deported back to SA from NZ straight after arriving because they determined that his main purpose there was to look for work.

Rather plan a proper trip, book some touristy things, and then also do the interview thing after arriving.

After hearing the stories of others I do indeed feel lucky to have landed a well paying job so quickly and easily, seems things just lined up and I arrived at the right time and spoke to the right people. Either way I'm thankful, as I had planned for 3 - 6 months of looking for something and starting at a lower salary than I will be. The guys I will be working for care nothing about nationality or Australian work experience, only skill level and whether you will fit in culturally, both from a personal culture, respect and integration perspective as well as the company culture. The senior network engineer was hired from India after a Skype interview, all because they needed a CCIE and after speaking to him they thought he would be a good fit. Not all companies are this open and forward thinking though, so it can be a challenge.

Good advice on the superannuation thing, I knew about that so when I mentioned my salary range I said plus super, lol. I believe you need to nominate which super fund you want though, any recommendations @^^vampire^^?
 

Corelli

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Watch out. New Zealand sucks. The maoris are in charge and you will always be a 2nd citizen. Also most affordable houses are badly built with no insulation and it leaks. And you will be far (4000kms) from anything. Most end up moving to Aus.

Aus has some bad construction in Sydney. Perth is the place to go to. But very expensive. I would go to the US instead.

But why not go to Seattle, USA instead. Much better as its IT heaven and the weather isnt too bad. Or Vancouver which is avout 100-200km north of it?
 

ryanrich

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Watch out. New Zealand sucks. The maoris are in charge and you will always be a 2nd citizen. Also most affordable houses are badly built with no insulation and it leaks. And you will be far (4000kms) from anything. Most end up moving to Aus.

Aus has some bad construction in Sydney. Perth is the place to go to. But very expensive. I would go to the US instead.

But why not go to Seattle, USA instead. Much better as its IT heaven and the weather isnt too bad. Or Vancouver which is avout 100-200km north of it?
LOL! Not quite sure what to make of this comment...
 

phaktza

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Watch out. New Zealand sucks. The maoris are in charge and you will always be a 2nd citizen. Also most affordable houses are badly built with no insulation and it leaks. And you will be far (4000kms) from anything. Most end up moving to Aus.

Aus has some bad construction in Sydney. Perth is the place to go to. But very expensive. I would go to the US instead.

But why not go to Seattle, USA instead. Much better as its IT heaven and the weather isnt too bad. Or Vancouver which is avout 100-200km north of it?
That's a bit ray-ray.

"It rains nine months a year in Seattle."
 

Botha22

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Watch out. New Zealand sucks. The maoris are in charge and you will always be a 2nd citizen. Also most affordable houses are badly built with no insulation and it leaks. And you will be far (4000kms) from anything. Most end up moving to Aus.

Aus has some bad construction in Sydney. Perth is the place to go to. But very expensive. I would go to the US instead.

But why not go to Seattle, USA instead. Much better as its IT heaven and the weather isnt too bad. Or Vancouver which is avout 100-200km north of it?
I doubt that NZ and Aus truly understand what they are getting into when they give visas to some Saffers.
 

GoB

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Aus has some bad construction in Sydney. Perth is the place to go to. But very expensive. I would go to the US instead.

But why not go to Seattle, USA instead. Much better as its IT heaven and the weather isnt too bad. Or Vancouver which is avout 100-200km north of it?
Don't know about the construction... "double brick" is more common in Perth if that's what you mean, but what is good enough is debatable. USA must have plenty of cheaply built houses.

I'd consider Seattle but personally the location won't work. The climate is worse than anywhere in AU though. And AU + NZ have clear Visa rules, but who knows how to go about USA / Canada if you can't follow an independent Visa... it may be an expensive process just to find an employer.
 

web

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Yeah I must say I would also be weary about assuming you can tell them you will be attending interviews. I personally know of a guy who in 2008/2009 when I was over there was deported back to SA from NZ straight after arriving because they determined that his main purpose there was to look for work.

Rather plan a proper trip, book some touristy things, and then also do the interview thing after arriving.

After hearing the stories of others I do indeed feel lucky to have landed a well paying job so quickly and easily, seems things just lined up and I arrived at the right time and spoke to the right people. Either way I'm thankful, as I had planned for 3 - 6 months of looking for something and starting at a lower salary than I will be. The guys I will be working for care nothing about nationality or Australian work experience, only skill level and whether you will fit in culturally, both from a personal culture, respect and integration perspective as well as the company culture. The senior network engineer was hired from India after a Skype interview, all because they needed a CCIE and after speaking to him they thought he would be a good fit. Not all companies are this open and forward thinking though, so it can be a challenge.

Good advice on the superannuation thing, I knew about that so when I mentioned my salary range I said plus super, lol. I believe you need to nominate which super fund you want though, any recommendations @^^vampire^^?

They are open to you looking for a job but like I said be honest. If you don't say you are going to be attending interviews they will decline your visa. I tried the didn't say anything approach the first time and was declined. Like I said in a previous post INZ will give you advice on what to do just phone them they are really helpful.
 

^^vampire^^

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Watch out. New Zealand sucks. The maoris are in charge and you will always be a 2nd citizen. Also most affordable houses are badly built with no insulation and it leaks. And you will be far (4000kms) from anything. Most end up moving to Aus.

Aus has some bad construction in Sydney. Perth is the place to go to. But very expensive. I would go to the US instead.

But why not go to Seattle, USA instead. Much better as its IT heaven and the weather isnt too bad. Or Vancouver which is avout 100-200km north of it?
I doubt that NZ and Aus truly understand what they are getting into when they give visas to some Saffers.
Although Corelli definitely lacks some tact he/she is not necessarily wrong.

* New Zealand definitely doesn't suck though, it's a very beautiful place and I would love to stay there but there are some caveats which make it not worthwhile.
* There has been a massive change in their approach to the Maori over the last couple of years to "undo" the injustices of the past. This has lead to them being placed on a pedestal to the detriment of everyone else in the country with the usual preferred treatment and getting away with a lot of untoward behaviour. That being said it's not nearly on any kind of scale of SA criminals and so in the view of saffers is probably a non event.
* Just like in Aus, NZ is probably also doing new builds which is cheap materials at massive prices because of the housing demand. I had my place built in Melbourne about 8 months ago and coming from an SA perspective it's basically wood and cardboard at the cost of gold and silver. My place cost $600k... I could get a double brick mansion in SA for that price, but unfortunately this is what it is and if you don't like it you don't have to buy it.
* Being 4000kms from anything doesn't really make sense. I guess this is aimed at it being a small island compared to other places in the world but is frankly a stupid comparison as just about everything is 4000km from everything else. At the end of the day it's cheap to hop on a flight to visit Tasmania, Aus, Fiji and Asian holidays aren't that far either.
* The affordable housing in all first world countries suck now. You can get a double brick older home, closer to the city and pay $2 million dollars (out of most peoples affordability) or you can get a single brick cardboard house on the outskirts which you can just manage to afford.
* My biggest gripe is salaries in NZ. The pay there is pretty low and that is the prime reason why many Kiwi's leave and come to Aus for work. If you can find a decent paying job in NZ and can make it all work then great for you. For me personally the difference can be up to $40k a year which is massive.
* Although Seattle is the "IT heaven" as Corelli puts it, not everyone wants to go there. Keep in mind that pound for pound your quality of dev in Seattle is most likely going to be far higher than other areas as it is home to many of the big players like Amazon, meaning that your skills may not measure up as favourably as in other places. This isn't a problem for people on top of their game but if you're an average dev you may struggle to land a job.
 
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