Engineering help. (Study wise)

Inn3rs3lf

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#21
Not quite true mate, SA is signed onto the international qualifications comparison framework where NQF levels are issued for each type of qualification. BTechs are not only accepted in a lot of countries, but also produced. (e.g. Auckland University in NZ)

Having said that, OP's N levels will count for very little if he's trying to get there.

As a Pr. Tech Eng, I would still advise him to go the B.Eng route. If he wants to do a B.Tech, he'll have the equivalent of an N3 if he finishes a matric at a technical high school. From there, N4-6 are certificate courses mostly for artisans.

In order to get a B.Tech (4-5 year), he has to do S levels, not N. a National Diploma in Elec Eng takes 3 years to complete. (S1-S4 + 2x 6month in service training), thereafter can he only apply to do his B.Tech. Very few institutions offer it full time over 1 year. (Ask me, I tried doing mine and was forced to take it over 2 years by both NMMU & CPUT).

The final outcome of a BTech is an NQF 7. Thereafter you can register as a candidate Engineering Technologist with ECSA for 3 years and then become a Professional Engineering Technologist. Not an engineer. As for one of the comments stating that Technologists elevate themselves without the competency, that's a gross generalisation. I've met some VERY VERY incompetent B.Eng engineers who loved throwing their titles around but were absolutely clueless. There are also incredibly intelligent and well applied BTechs/MTechs around our country who will match the best engineers in their field - but that's not due to the BTech course or the Eng course, it's due to the individual's aptitude and interest - and of course there are BTechs who are useless too - as with every degree out there.
Thank you for this. Very insightful!
 

ponder

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#22
Thank you for this. Very insightful!
Dunno if it was you or someone else that mentioned going abroad but I do recall a guy with a B.Tech going to the USA, signing up at a well known university over there to do a M.Sc Eng or M.Eng, they accepted him and he completed the degree. While at CPUT there was a guy there from Germany doing his doctorate but that's research and accredited via his institution in Germany.
 

ponder

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#24
I'm not disputing that they recognize it. But just because they recognize your degree does not automatically mean that they'll let you work there.
Yeah, those technikon graduates have a real hard time finding work in foreign countries...
 
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#25
Given the fact that time is a factor because of your job commitments and age, I would like to share some info for your consideration.

1) N1-N3 (3 trimesters, 12 courses min.) is a neccesity if your going to do a trade or Government Certificate of Competency as a CE.
2) N4-N6 (3 trimesters, 12 courses min.) is post-matric vocational qualification which lead to a National N Diploma (NQF 6, 360 Credits), awarded when having 2 years subsequent experience or a trade certificate.
3) S1-S4 (4 semesters, +-30 courses min.) is a higher learning qualification which leads to a National Diploma (NQF 6, 360 Credits), awarded when having completed a further 2 semesters in a workplace (P1 & P2) on experiential training, after completing S1-S4.
4) BTech (2 semesters, +- 8 courses) (NQF 7, 120 Credits) is a technical degree for Technologists awarded after completing a block release, full-time or distance learnig modules through a university of Technology.
5) Mtech (2 semesters, research, etc.) (NQF 8, 120 Credits) is a higher technical degree (Masters) for Technologists which can also be completed through research or coursework or both.
6) BEng/BScEng (4 Years, NQF 8, 560 Credits) is a Professional first degree for Engineers which covers complex engineering coursework and a broader knowledge of its application in solving complex problems. It can only be done full-time at a traditional university.

Now, with these definitions in place we can begin to work on possible scenarios:
1) Forget the BEng/BScEng degrees because they are full-time attendance degrees.
2) You do not need to do a trade, therefore N1-N3 if you have matric and will have means to acquire the 2 year practical after completing N6 (NQF 5, 240 Credits) to get to the National N Diploma.
3) N4-N6 covering all Electrical and Mechanical courses at a pass above 60% will be credited at most universities of technology towards the S1-S4 studies. The upside to completing these first is that you've mentioned the study gap in your life and since these can be attended on part-time basis, they will be able to prepare you for correspondence courses further down the line.
4) Complete the remaining, non-credited courses on S1-S4, probably through correspondence at Unisa or at satelite campuses of some universities of technology.
5) Complete your Btech, preferrably through block release or part-time at a university of technology and not unisa.
6) Consider doing a Post Graduate Diploma to enable you to do an MEng instead of MTech. Then, you can be engineer instead of Technologist, if thats what you really want. Again, all are internationally recognized through accreditation system regulated by ECSA and SAQA (Check their websites or visit them for more information).

Total commitment years will amount to a minimum of 7 years but its worth the effort and the good thing is, which each step completed you'll be exposing yourself to better opportunities.

N.B.: All this information is readily available on the SAQA and ECSA websites.

I hope this helps and good luck on your studies.
 
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#26
hi, as a concerned mom, I thank you for your input of the N1-N6 FET course. my son will be done next year and instead of my original plan to let him do the diploma of mechanical engineering at UJ and then the BTECH, will he not qualify to do the BSC mechanical engineering degree. The N6 is seen as higher than matric, I cannot see why he cannot do the full time degree at Wits as appose to the btech route, but for the fact that he will not have matric physical science, but instead a N6 with engineering science. what do you think.
 

nerdlingza

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#27
hi, as a concerned mom, I thank you for your input of the N1-N6 FET course. my son will be done next year and instead of my original plan to let him do the diploma of mechanical engineering at UJ and then the BTECH, will he not qualify to do the BSC mechanical engineering degree. The N6 is seen as higher than matric, I cannot see why he cannot do the full time degree at Wits as appose to the btech route, but for the fact that he will not have matric physical science, but instead a N6 with engineering science. what do you think.
What did ur son end up doing ?
 
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#28
My 2 cents to anyone with the same question or you want to immigrate plus you want to make good money. Do your trade become a electrician, you will make a lot more money than a electrical engineer quality of life’s is much better 8 hour days that’s including your lunch and your first on the highly skilled list.

This counts for first world countries like UK and Australia Souths Africa they screw the trades
 

cguy

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#29
My 2 cents to anyone with the same question or you want to immigrate plus you want to make good money. Do your trade become a electrician, you will make a lot more money than a electrical engineer quality of life’s is much better 8 hour days that’s including your lunch and your first on the highly skilled list.

This counts for first world countries like UK and Australia Souths Africa they screw the trades
Rather become an electrical engineer. Higher averages, and much better upside.
 
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#30
Ok what’s the upside? Longer ours? Less pay?

If you plan to immigrate to Australia or Uk then you will be earning a lot less then me, it’s simple supply and demand and don’t look at payscale or any site that says electricians earn $48 that’s If you work for somebody and You do nothing all day maybe fix a couple of lights. But if you work for yourself your earning potential is limitless.
Do two solar installs that’s 6 to 7 hours work after cost you can minimum a grand probably 2 in your pocket. And all those white vans you see parked at in Bondi and the rest of the eastern suburbs are not doing night work they live there for those who don’t know the eastern suburbs of Sydney is where wealthy and famous live it’s most expensive postcodes in Australia.
 

cguy

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#31
Ok what’s the upside? Longer ours? Less pay?

If you plan to immigrate to Australia or Uk then you will be earning a lot less then me, it’s simple supply and demand and don’t look at payscale or any site that says electricians earn $48 that’s If you work for somebody and You do nothing all day maybe fix a couple of lights. But if you work for yourself your earning potential is limitless.
Do two solar installs that’s 6 to 7 hours work after cost you can minimum a grand probably 2 in your pocket. And all those white vans you see parked at in Bondi and the rest of the eastern suburbs are not doing night work they live there for those who don’t know the eastern suburbs of Sydney is where wealthy and famous live it’s most expensive postcodes in Australia.
Most of the electrical engineers I know, make $500k+/y USD (this isn’t the norm, but the potential upside I mentioned). The maths, physics, signal processing, control theory, etc. can be used in other industries. There is a huge market for those with digital design expertise as well.

You also don’t have to climb on roofs and lug around equipment in the heat or lay someone to do it for you.
 
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