Eskom’s biggest power plant has broken pollution equipment

rpm

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#1
Eskom’s largest power plant has broken pollution equipment

Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd. said pollution reduction equipment at its biggest operational plant hasn’t been working properly since early last year.

The equipment, which cuts particulate emissions at the 4,116 megawatt coal-fired Kendal power station in South Africa’s eastern province of Mpumalanga, began malfunctioning in early 2018. It was then damaged during a strike in July and August of that year. Eskom has 15 coal-fired power plants either operating or under construction.
 

reactor_sa

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#4
One of my biggest issues with visiting SA is the cloud of pollution hanging over the skyline. Makes me feel like I'm suffocating.
 

TysonRoux

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#8
Damning report on Eskom air pollution

Over a period of 21 months, Eskom’s coal-fired power plants belched pollutants that exceeded South Africa’s already weak air quality standards close to 3,200 times, sometimes by as much as 15 times the legal limit.

The excessive emissions include particulate matter (PM), sulphur oxides (SO2), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx).

The figures – a conservative estimate drawn from the power utility’s own monthly air quality reports, as submitted to environmental authorities – show that nearly all its coal-fired plants are possibly operating illegally and that Eskom’s pollution control measures are not working. Many of the excessive emissions were frequent at particular plants.
 

TysonRoux

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#9
Eskom admits Mpumalanga’s level of air pollution needs attention

Eskom has admitted that the level of air pollution in Mpumalanga needs urgent attention.
The cash-strapped power utility on Monday told Business Report that its air-quality modelling and monitoring showed elevated levels of particulate matter and a likely more significant impact on people’s health.

It claimed, however, that it was not only to blame, as domestic coal burning, traffic and dust from other sources, such as mining and agriculture, also contributed to the pollution.

Eskom said a new study carried out by Dr Andy Gray, an expert in air and health risk monitoring, which was cited in the court papers filed by GroundWork and Vukani Environmental Justice Movement in Action, had very similar findings to the studies it has commissioned since 2006.

The two non-governmental organisations have instituted a class action against the government for failing to take action against toxic levels of air pollution that are allegedly being emitted by 12 Eskom plants in Mpumalanga and Sasol’s synfuels operations in Secunda and its Natref oil refinery. They said the 14 plants were responsible for most of the pollution that had resulted in hundreds of deaths in 2016.
 

TysonRoux

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#10
Eskom – now its survival via increased air pollution

This is a potent illustration of how civic society organisations protect us all and hold a corruption-crippled, impoverished ‘quick-fix’ government to account. A reading of this environmental NGO consortium’s court application shows that the chances of winning – and preventing us from adding air-induced diseases to the threats from maintenance-free water-recycling plants and polluted groundwater, are excellent. So intent are our various tiers of government on (rightly, but clumsily) restoring equity and fairness, that they’ve neglected virtually everything else. Nasty, cheap short-cuts or ignoring vital maintenance have become the outrageous norm, as illustrated by this sly bid (how else can you describe ignoring civic consultation requirements) to double minimum harmful emission standards. Stolen blind by Zuptoids and their tenderpreneur cronies, a beleaguered Eskom is now trying to save money by getting its political masters to allow its coal stations to double their air pollution. It might save billions and even contribute to kickstarting the economy – but at the cost of thousands more pollution-induced deaths and a degraded quality of life for anyone living remotely close to coal-fired powered stations. – Chris Bateman
 

TysonRoux

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#11
The sorry state of air pollution from Eskom’s coal-fired power stations

With all the emphasis on Eskom’s financial and operational sustainability and future structure, the utility’s environmental performance and sustainability are inevitably neglected, and indeed has become the sacrificial lamb on the altar of the money gods.

In October 2018, an analysis and study of Eskom’s own air pollution monitoring reports, commissioned by the Centre for Environmental Rights and undertaken by Dr Ranajit (Ron) Sahu, a US-based consultant in the field of environmental, mechanical and chemical engineering, revealed the sorry state of Eskom’s atmospheric emissions — with some 3,200 exceedances of its atmospheric emission licence limits in a 21-month period.
 

TysonRoux

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#16
No pollution and no electricity? Yeah, right! Eskom is damned if they do and damned if they don't.
The reason why the supply of power to paying customers is so unreliable, is the same reason why the useless cnuts don't have working emissions control equipment, lack of maintenance and forward planning, .... not a case of "damned if they do and damned if they don't".
 
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