Every COVID-19 vaccine and treatment in development and on trial, so far.

doodlesZHS

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Dec 15, 2017
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Well immunosupressents are kak expensive so hopefully the cheapies like chloroquine,azithromycin and cholchicine prove to be very effective:)
 

Mirai

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Oct 21, 2017
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Ah yaysus,now colchicine will start flying off the shelves as well:ROFL:

It's just as an anti-inflammatory for the 'cytokine storm' which can follow serious COVID-19 infections. So it's not an anti-viral drug but more of a drug used to treat the negative effects of the immune system over reaction to the virus and its effects.
 

doodlesZHS

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Dec 15, 2017
Messages
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It's just as an anti-inflammatory for the 'cytokine storm' which can follow serious COVID-19 infections. So it's not an anti-viral drug but more of a drug used to treat the negative effects of the immune system over reaction to the virus and its effects.
Yep I was really hoping the Kaletra/aluvia trial was sucessful in reducing the viral load as I still had some of those tablets left from PEP.
 

Gordon_R

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hexagon

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May 31, 2006
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This is a fairly technical but informative survey of the status of the candidate vaccines, their various approaches and targets. The CanSino Ad5-nCov vaccine is apparently the first to start enrolling for Phase II trials.
 

Gordon_R

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First candidate vaccine is promising, though it requires storage at -80C:
There are around a dozen in the final stages of testing, but this is the first to show any results.

It uses a completely experimental approach - that involves injecting part of the virus's genetic code - in order to train the immune system.
Two doses, three weeks apart, are needed. The trials - in US, Germany, Brazil, Argentina, South Africa and Turkey - show 90% protection is achieved seven days after the second dose.

Pfizer believes it will be able to supply 50 million doses by the end of this year, and around 1.3 billion by the end of 2021.

However, there are logistical challenges as the vaccine has to be kept in ultra-cold storage at below minus 80C.

There are also questions about how long immunity lasts.
 

Gordon_R

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Dosage still needs to be tweaked:
When volunteers were given two "high" doses the protection was 62%, but this rose to 90% when people were given a "low" dose followed by a high one. It's not clear why there is a difference.
There were also lower levels of asymptomatic infection in the low-followed-by-high-dose group which "means we might be able to halt the virus in its tracks," Prof Pollard said.
After Pfizer and Moderna both produced vaccines delivering 95% protection from Covid-19, a figure of 70% will be seen by some as relatively disappointing.

However, anything above 50% would have been considered a triumph just a month ago and 70% is comfortably better than the seasonal flu jab.

This is still a vaccine that can save lives from Covid-19.

It also has crucial advantages that make it easier to use. It can be stored at fridge temperature, which means it can be distributed to every corner of the world, unlike the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, which need to be stored at much colder temperatures.
 
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