Every COVID-19 vaccine and treatment in development and on trial, so far.

Gordon_R

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This makes plenty of sense to me. Why it would cost more than a vaccine or why it is considered not to be a replacement for vaccines is a bit of a mystery.

Antibodies are large protein molecules and expensive to produce (or extract from donors). The whole point of vaccines is that a small quantity can be injected, and after two weeks the body's inmune system will have produced large numbers of antibodies. Its a 'free' method of leveraging a natural process. It is also longer lasting, since memory T cells are trained to keep producing antibodies forever.
 
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The_Ogre

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So here is a thought:

1. Early on, it was shown that smokers are less affected by this virus if they get infected - presumably because nicotine reduces the virus' ability to infect a person.

2. Now, we hear that those receiving the vaccines must not consume alcohol for 2 weeks before, in the period between any repeat shots and for 3 weeks after. Presumably, this is because alcohol affects the effectiveness of the vaccine. Thus it is fair to say that consumers of alcohol are probably also less affected by the virus in the first place?

So, tell me then with tears in my eyes why Alcohol sales are being limited? And, maybe, just maybe the numbers we are now seeing seeking hospitalisation is partly due to the lower alcohol consumption levels?

Just a thought. I wonder if someone has some data to analyse to try and show what effect alcohol has on the virus' ability to infect people??

:unsure: :eek: :ROFL: o_O
This was the post I've made on Sunday after probably the 30th person I know died.

I suspect alcohol actually provides some form of protection. Of all the people I know who died from 'rona, none of them were regular drinkers
 

Geoff.D

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bromster

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Ja sure, makes perfect sense when the decision is taken by the damn politicians. The ONLY people who should be making this call are the medical practioners.
I hardly think UK government would do this without consultation. This isn't America. Or South Africa.
 

Gordon_R

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Ja sure, makes perfect sense when the decision is taken by the damn politicians. The ONLY people who should be making this call are the medical practioners.

There are profound philosophical and ethical differences in the vaccination strategies, there is no single right way:
 

Geoff.D

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I did not even get to that dilemma. My point is that whatever the moral and ethical decision is, if the vaccine requires two doses then that is what has to be given. We don't need politicians to start fiddling with this requirement because it might mean noons will benefit from the effort.
Inn SA, we know what the decision is going to be, ANC members first, then health workers keeping in mind rule one, then only the rest.

We heard yesterday about the very first family member to pass away. Very distant relative, convinced to go into an old age home for his protection because he " can't look after himself".
Contracts Covid in the home and dies.
He would have still been okay living by himself!
 

Gordon_R

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India licences two vaccines:
The Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine is being manufactured locally by the Serum Institute of India, the world's largest vaccine manufacturer. It says it is producing more than 50 million doses a month.

Adar Poonawalla, the company's CEO, told the BBC in November that he aimed to ramp up production to 100 million doses a month after receiving regulatory approval.
 

Gordon_R

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India licences two vaccines:

Controversy over incomplete trials before licencing of local vaccine in India:
 

Gordon_R

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The BMJ states that single dose AstraZeneca vaccine provides very good short term protection. Similar data is not available for other vaccines:
 

Gordon_R

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Visual overview of all countries vaccine targets:
 

Gordon_R

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A trawl of existing licenced drugs turned up two anti-inflamatories (in addition to dexamethasone). However they are incredibly expensive, and have limited effects:
Although the drugs are not cheap, costing around £750 to £1,000 per patient, on top of the £5 course of dexamethasone, the advantage of using them is clear - and less than the cost per day of an intensive care bed of around £2,000, say experts.

Lead researcher Prof Anthony Gordon, from Imperial College London, said: "For every 12 patients you treat with these drugs you would expect to save a life. It's a big effect."

In the REMAP-CAP trial carried out in six different countries, including the UK, with around 800 intensive care patients:
- Nearly 36% of intensive care Covid patients receiving standard care died
- The new drugs reduced that by a quarter, to 27%, when given to patients within 24 hours of them entering intensive care.
 
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