Evidence of Lakes on Europa

carstensdj

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Quote from 2010. It was part of the last message that HAL broadcast before the Discovery was destroyed.

Ah i see!

They reckon that there is oceans under the moons crust as well, but alot further down than on Europa.
 

Mineer

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watching discovery the other day and they where talking about organisms that live Antarctica in the ice creating small swimming pools to swim in, they proposed that because of this there maybe similar organisms living on Europa
 

TJ99

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yes and its significant cos it could mean life on that planet

Moons, not planets, but of course it's significant. Which is why I'm asking. I know of frozen water on the moon but not liquid oceans.
 

carstensdj

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Moons, not planets, but of course it's significant. Which is why I'm asking. I know of frozen water on the moon but not liquid oceans.

Yep! Actual oceans if i remember correcly (Could be wrong). Will try source the article now.. I saw it last week some time.
 

Binary_Bark

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Water Vapor Was Just Found on Europa, More Evidence There’s Liquid Water Beneath All that Ice

What’s been long-suspected has now been confirmed: Jupiter’s moon Europa has water. As we’ve learned more about the outer Solar System in recent years, Europa has become a high-priority target in the search for life. With this discovery, NASA has just painted a big red bulls-eye on Jupiter’s smallest Galilean moon.

Prior to this discovery, scientists already had some evidence that Europa has the potential to harbor life. The moon has the smoothest surface of any object in the Solar System, which led scientists to hypothesize that it had liquid water in a subsurface ocean, kept above freezing by tidal flexing from Jupiter. That tidal flexing not only keeps the water in liquid form, it creates ice plate movement similar to tectonic plates on Earth, according to the hypothesis.

More evidence came from studying the brown splotches on Europa’s surface. Scientists hypothesized that those are chemicals from the subsurface ocean which have made their way to the surface. This shows that the sea floor might be interacting with the surface, an important consideration when thinking about habitability.

 

zippy

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Life needs energy. A lot of it. The only possible source of energy on Europa is geological. I’m not sure that is enough. Io might have enough geological energy, but it has too many other negative factors. For life to thrive you need relative geological stability, energy and a reasonably stable local area in space. For a very long time. I doubt the Jovian system is that area.
 
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