Excitement and consequent anxiety over new opportunity

SaucePlz

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Whether it's applying for an amazing new job or waiting for the bank to say if you can afford that house you're keen on, I'm certain we've all had that feeling of hopeful excitement before receiving feedback on some decision. I'm currently awaiting feedback on, for me at least, a life changing career opportunity.
The paperwork has been done and their questions answered, all that remains is for them to make a decision.
A dichotomy exists between optimism for the future in succeeding and the anxiety of failure.
If I can't win the Lotto, at least let me get this :D
Any tips for handling the disappointment of not getting it?
 
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NeedAChange

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Dec 1, 2014
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All the best. Exciting times enjoy every moment regardless of outcome. This whole feeling of excitement is special and you should cherish it.
 

Aghori

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Don't stress about it. Have a whiskey and a fag and chill until you get a reply.
 

B-1

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You have to see failure as an opportunity to learn something and improve yourself. Sometimes you will nail it first time other times you will have to keep trying over and over again. But as long as you can take something out of the experience you haven't failed. Disappointment is also part of life so don't try and run from it just let it be and then regroup and move forwards. Good luck hope you nail this one.
 

cguy

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What’s important to remember is that although, it feels like a once in a lifetime opportunity, it probably is not. It just feels that way because it is the only opportunity in front of you, right now.

It’s more than likely a “once in a month” opportunity. Oh, you say this one is unique? They all are. :)

The other important thing to realize is that you have a whole series of “known unknowns” and “unknown unknowns” in front of you. In a similar way to how you probably never conceived you would be in this position, say 4 weeks ago, you don’t know what opportunities may be coming along. The likelihood of this being the “one” that if missed will result in a material difference to the outcome of your life, is extremely small.
 
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nexxus

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Apr 9, 2006
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590
Whether it's applying for an amazing new job or waiting for the bank to say if you can afford that house you're keen on, I'm certain we've all had that feeling of hopeful excitement before receiving feedback on some decision. I'm currently awaiting feedback on, for me at least, a life changing career opportunity.
The paperwork has been done and their questions answered, all that remains is for them to make a decision.
A dichotomy exists between optimism for the future in succeeding and the anxiety of failure.
If I can't win the Lotto, at least let me get this :D
Any tips for handling the disappointment of not getting it?
Like you would for the house, sometimes you've just got to swallow it and move on. However, if it really excites you, there's nothing stopping it from being a long term chase.

Thank them for the chance to interview, toss in a few sentences that go something along the lines of "Ah, I thought I'd work really well on <blah> because of the <bleh> I've done before." Try to ask for some feedback on what you could have done better and see if there's any way you can stay in touch. Take contact details of any people you had a rapport with and check in again in 4-6m, being sure to mention what you've done, how you've grown and what in particular you've done that would be relevant to them, eg. "Hey, I just wanted to get in touch to thank you for pointing me toward React, I've done a couple projects using it and it's been really great. Could I get you a cup of coffee to talk over them a bit?" If you get anything affirmative, set a time, date and send a meeting request then and there.

Another thing I'd say is that you should never be waiting for the bank to say you can afford a house, if you don't know that you 100% can, you're in for a struggle. (Just my 2c)
 

SaucePlz

Senior Member
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Aug 11, 2020
Messages
531
...The likelihood of this being the “one” that if missed will result in a material difference to the outcome of your life, is extremely small.
I know there will be others and have no problem working towards creating new ones, but getting this will vastly improve my current situation in a short amount of time. A family member was diagnosed with cancer in 2019, which dug into the finances and then the pandemic hit. Needless to say, things have been tough. I'm by no means on the verge of being put out on the street, but every month I need to stretch things a bit further, spend more time plugging holes, worrying if this is the month I will fall behind.

Thank them for the chance to interview, toss in a few sentences that go something along the lines of "Ah, I thought I'd work really well on <blah> because of the <bleh> I've done before." Try to ask for some feedback on what you could have done better and see if there's any way you can stay in touch. Take contact details of any people you had a rapport with and check in again in 4-6m, being sure to mention what you've done, how you've grown and what in particular you've done that would be relevant to them, eg. "Hey, I just wanted to get in touch to thank you for pointing me toward React, I've done a couple projects using it and it's been really great. Could I get you a cup of coffee to talk over them a bit?" If you get anything affirmative, set a time, date and send a meeting request then and there.

Another thing I'd say is that you should never be waiting for the bank to say you can afford a house, if you don't know that you 100% can, you're in for a struggle. (Just my 2c)
Thanks for this, will keep in mind.
 
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