Five things you need to know about the new National Health Insurance Bill

mvww

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Parliament is set to release the National Health Insurance (NHI) Bill by 9am on Thursday morning. Here is how healthcare in South Africa is likely to change.
1. Will you be able to have a comprehensive medical aid?
No. Once the NHI has been fully implemented, your medical scheme will not be allowed to cover any health services that the NHI offers. You will have to use the NHI for those services.

https://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/five-things-you-need-to-know-about-the-new-national-health-insurance-bill-20190808
 

Chris_the_Brit

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Or just buy gold.
That too. I've done my research and holding for the very long term, Visa and Microsoft.

Want to invest a smaller amount also finding the "next Amazon" - a few candidates like Square, Shopify are coming up repeatedly but Shopify is too expensive for me at over $300 a share.
 

surface

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your medical scheme will not be allowed to cover any health services that the NHI offers
I didn't get this part. I thought NHI was to be additional cost tax payers have to take burden for. This looks like NHI is replacing medical schemes if NHI offers it.
 

Venomous

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Ok,
So the taxpayer pays...
Doesn't the taxpayer already pay for the medical attention everyone receives at govt institutions?

Lets over look all the rest that is wrong and corrupt in this process.

Sipho is a domestic worker earning R2000 a month(3 days a week). She gets bronchitis and goes to a govt clinic or hospital. She either gets completely free meds or she pays maybe R20 or R50 for her visit.

Sipho works for Mrs Dlamini.
Mrs Dlamini is a fortunate lady. In the mornings she glitzes with high society. After school time she collects the kids and does mommy duties.

Currently Mrs Dlamini's husband pays for her private medical aid. Mrs Dlamini sees(annually) a specialist physician who practices in Capetown for her medical condition as said person in considered the best in their field. Mrs Dlamini lives in Knysna. Her husband is the main member and Mrs Dlamini is on his policy.

Here is are some points.
Mrs Dlamini does not earn a wage and as such is not taxed in any form. She will now see the same dr as Sipho if either of them gets flu. Neither will contribute to the NHI as the one is a low income worker and the other is unemployed.
Previously Mrs Dlamini was not a burden on the taxpayer, now she is(not by choice)
Under the new system Mrs Dlamini must see her local doctor, then get refered to another local doctor, who may or may not know how to treat her. What if Mrs Dlamini suffers an episode that causes a set back due to incorrect treatment?
 

phaktza

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Ok,
So the taxpayer pays...
Doesn't the taxpayer already pay for the medical attention everyone receives at govt institutions?

Lets over look all the rest that is wrong and corrupt in this process.

Sipho is a domestic worker earning R2000 a month(3 days a week). She gets bronchitis and goes to a govt clinic or hospital. She either gets completely free meds or she pays maybe R20 or R50 for her visit.

Sipho works for Mrs Dlamini.
Mrs Dlamini is a fortunate lady. In the mornings she glitzes with high society. After school time she collects the kids and does mommy duties.

Currently Mrs Dlamini's husband pays for her private medical aid. Mrs Dlamini sees(annually) a specialist physician who practices in Capetown for her medical condition as said person in considered the best in their field. Mrs Dlamini lives in Knysna. Her husband is the main member and Mrs Dlamini is on his policy.

Here is are some points.
Mrs Dlamini does not earn a wage and as such is not taxed in any form. She will now see the same dr as Sipho if either of them gets flu. Neither will contribute to the NHI as the one is a low income worker and the other is unemployed.
Previously Mrs Dlamini was not a burden on the taxpayer, now she is(not by choice)
Under the new system Mrs Dlamini must see her local doctor, then get refered to another local doctor, who may or may not know how to treat her. What if Mrs Dlamini suffers an episode that causes a set back due to incorrect treatment?
Welcome to socialised medicine!
 

phaktza

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That too. I've done my research and holding for the very long term, Visa and Microsoft.

Want to invest a smaller amount also finding the "next Amazon" - a few candidates like Square, Shopify are coming up repeatedly but Shopify is too expensive for me at over $300 a share.
I've only invested in foreign currency. Made 5% in the last week alone with zero risk.
 

Pitbull

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I'm really hoping they can make this work.

Having to pay R 6k a month for something you may or may not need is a ball ache. I would much rather pay a quarter of that and have the same type of cover if/when I need it. But we already know how this is going to pan out...
 

access

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so you can still go to specialists directly but the nhi will not cover it. so now specialised medical is on an ad hoc basis for those that can afford it. this leaves greater scope for even more expensive specialised treatment.

the current taxes going towards government health care is already pissed away. what in the world makes anyone think that more money towards government health care will go where it is supposed to.
 

noxibox

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If the government cannot manage existing public health services, the road accident fund or the various crippled state businesses, then there is no way they are going to be able to manage national health insurance. If public medical services actually worked they'd easily be able to expand those to include additional services. Instead they appear to be hoping to cover over the failure of those public health services by introducing something new. They do the same sort of thing with schooling. It's a mess, but instead of addressing the actual underlying problems they revamp the curriculum or they buy tablets or they build fancy schools filled with the latest gadgets.

In general socialised health services are a good thing, and they're working all over the world. They give access to health care, and they usually don't stop the well off from paying extra to get care faster or use some more expensive treatment. But they work because they're competently managed, and they have enough people paying tax to fund them. The same goes for other socialised services. It works, it is good, but it requires that management.
 

Biks666

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Expect most private practitioners to pack up shop and move abroad. Just take Steve biko as an example - No lights , lifts are broken not even mentioning the availability of staff.

I truly think this is the final nail in the coffin for SA.
 

Pitbull

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Expect most private practitioners to pack up shop and move abroad. Just take Steve biko as an example - No lights , lifts are broken not even mentioning the availability of staff.

I truly think this is the final nail in the coffin for SA.
Doubt it.

Reading the article Patients will be registered to Doctors (I assume per area) so why say no to patients being forced to come to your practice instead of another? It's money for mahala. If the system actually works that is.
 

Chris_the_Brit

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Pitbull

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You should read about the trials done on WRT the NHI. Complete disaster. No payments etc.
And that will be the nail in the coffin.

The idea is pretty sound. But as mentioned before, they can't even run the public health service as it stands, this will cause a massive problem and might even cripple health services in SA all together. But I'm cautiously optimistic that they can do it right. Only time will tell.
 

SeRpEnT

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Doubt it.

Reading the article Patients will be registered to Doctors (I assume per area) so why say no to patients being forced to come to your practice instead of another? It's money for mahala. If the system actually works that is.
Nope. Currently there is a suggestion by the evaluation committee that evaluated the NHI Trial that doctors should be contracted at their own practice/offices. In the trial period GP's had to travel to the rural areas. They could charge travel claims (costly). They did not work fulltime and only spent a couple of hours at the sites. In the end about half of the patients ended up seeing GP's. The rest of the patients had to deal with nurses (!!!).

http://www.health.gov.za/index.php/national-health-insurance-right-menu?download=3567:nhi-evaluation-report-final
 

ToxicBunny

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And that will be the nail in the coffin.

The idea is pretty sound. But as mentioned before, they can't even run the public health service as it stands, this will cause a massive problem and might even cripple health services in SA all together. But I'm cautiously optimistic that they can do it right. Only time will tell.
You are possibly the only one..

NHI will cripple primary healthcare in this country for absolutely everyone.
 
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