Gordhan cancels Christmas break for Eskom execs

UrBaN963

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This thread is a good example of what is wrong with South African mentality.

How many times have we seen, "why don't they DO something about it"posts. So here we have our friend Gordhan - probably our greatest ally in politics (in that he actually wants to get things done) - and all that is now posted is miindless cynicism.

I'm not saying you guys are wrong, I'm just saying the dude is doing something. If it was Zuma, Ramaphosa, Hlaudi, I'd agree with it being PR/BS, but this is Gordhan telling people to pull finger. It also means a bunch of bodyguards and security personnl won't need to be dispatched to Dubai/Paris/whatever when these leeches take their leave.

All things considered, this is EXACTLY what he should be doing. Making the lazy culprits feel the sting of having been inept. As much as there may or may not be additional pay involved, there sure as hell will be upset family members, costs incurred due to late cancellations of hotels/flights/whateverr - those costs are personal to them. (Yes, I know ultimately we pay for it - it still comes out of their accounts.)

Point is it's a start. It's also symbolic. They've essentially been grounded and dad is checking that they're doing their chores. It's a start.
 

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LOL.

@thechamp is it really necessary to also include the ads.chargeads.com in your OP?
I seem to have missed a problem of some sort here? I would not think of the Champ as guilty of improper conduct. He seems dead straight to me. The best sort of old school socialist.
 

ForceFate

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Obviously nightjar is part of that small percentage of the population, turning back the clock means no more load shedding for nightjar, that is all that matters to nightjar.
Going back to apartheid, it means no electricity for my parents:(
 

Frequent visitor

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This thread is a good example of what is wrong with South African mentality.

How many times have we seen, "why don't they DO something about it"posts. So here we have our friend Gordhan - probably our greatest ally in politics (in that he actually wants to get things done) - and all that is now posted is miindless cynicism.

I'm not saying you guys are wrong, I'm just saying the dude is doing something. If it was Zuma, Ramaphosa, Hlaudi, I'd agree with it being PR/BS, but this is Gordhan telling people to pull finger. It also means a bunch of bodyguards and security personnl won't need to be dispatched to Dubai/Paris/whatever when these leeches take their leave.

All things considered, this is EXACTLY what he should be doing. Making the lazy culprits feel the sting of having been inept. As much as there may or may not be additional pay involved, there sure as hell will be upset family members, costs incurred due to late cancellations of hotels/flights/whateverr - those costs are personal to them. (Yes, I know ultimately we pay for it - it still comes out of their accounts.)

Point is it's a start. It's also symbolic. They've essentially been grounded and dad is checking that they're doing their chores. It's a start.
I have quite a lot of time for Pravin Gordhan. More power to his elbow! Perhaps cancelling ALL Eskom leave would be better. Maintenance could be caught up on for one. This country takes far too much leave, which in your dire straits is madness. No one elsewhere will take you seriously if you stop working all the time. I used to work on a 24/7/365 basis in the UK. I was on duty for at least part of every Christmas Day for 18 years. Do not get me wrong: I averaged 50 hours a week, not all day and every day, but had to be there when required, without notice. Public holidays (we had 9, not 13) were working days unless rostered off. (1 in 6).
You need more Pravin Gordhans. I don't care what his politics are: he has integrity. He commands respect from the international community. His 'Hard Talk' interview with a BBC Rottweiler earlier this year was an indication of that.
 

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Communist;)
Is that a problem? Integrity is more important. Pravin Gordhan is or was a Communist for example. But people develop as they mature. I might not agree with all of his viewpoints, but I do not doubt the Champs honesty.
 

nightjar

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how is catering for 1-2% of the population going to solve the problem?
1-2% of the population
???

The sole purpose of Eskom, from its inception in 1923, was to produce and sell electricity at the cheapest possible price and to ensure that South Africa had enough electricity.

Eskom was free of political interference and was very lightly regulated, much less so than private electricity utilities in the USA. It was an autonomous organisation run by technocrats and engineers who were in charge and were appointed entirely on merit. Even under apartheid, there was no attempt to “Afrikanerise” Eskom’s senior management. Eskom’s greatest CEO was Ian McRae, an English-speaker. Eskom was entirely self-financing and there were no state subsidies for electricity.

In 1994 the ANC saw Eskom as a bottomless pit of cash that could be plundered indefinitely and highly skilled and experienced white engineers, managers, and technicians were were pushed out to make way for comrades straight out of the bush – often at a ratio of two or three to one.

Additionally, along with the general collapse of law & order, came the attitude that nobody needed to pay for their consumption and people were free to hook themselves into the grid.

Apartheid was a rotten system but Eskom was a model of good management and operated independently but instead of building on that foundation the ANC looted and destroyed it.

(I have to close now because a scheduled power failure is imminent and I need to shut down.)
 

ponder

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Is that a problem?
I dispise communism, people that lived under that system and fled will tell you how horrible it is. thechamp does not believe in private property rights, he's all for the effs state owned property rights bs.
 

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I dispise communism, people that lived under that system and fled will tell you how horrible it is. thechamp does not believe in private property rights, he's all for the effs state owned property rights bs.
But surely you can distinguish him from say Malema?
 

ponder

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But surely you can distinguish him from say Malema?
Yes I can but they both seem to support the same vile ideology. He's not Malema by a long shot and Malema is not thechamp but at the core there is communism.
 

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Yes I can but they both seem to support the same vile ideology. He's not Malema by a long shot and Malema is not thechamp but at the core there is communism.
I worked in Georgia in 2000/ 2001 (cold! -20 on a sunny day at midday), so 10 years after the collapse of the USSR. Stalin had been born there, and the last Foreign Minister of the USSR was the President of Georgia. Generally the youngsters welcomed the chance to stretch their wings, but my interpreter's father and many of his age group missed the security. He was an architect and had never been without work before: he did not like that.
But since then Putin has been trying to recreate the USSR. He has some support of course. What he lacks is what the Champ has: integrity. Communism is chiefly bad for the same reasons that the ANC is: greed and corruption. The Catholic Church has had the same issues, and is still in a bad way. Islam began to go badly wrong just after Mohammed died, and the argument over who would inherit the spoils began.
So all is not so simple as good and bad systems. Human nature is where it goes wrong. The cadre who fixed up a bursary from Denel probably thought he was being a good Dad, and Zuma will doubtless think he is the same too.
 

John_Phoenix

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Going back to apartheid, it means no electricity for my parents:(
Force, your parents had access to electricity before you where born, while you where being born, and after you where born. Unless you're 100 years old, in which case your parents had candles.
 

thestaggy

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Let's see if any of those that partook in a quick circle jerk will respond to nightjar's excellent post. :unsure:
 

thechamp

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Let's see if any of those that partook in a quick circle jerk will respond to nightjar's excellent post. :unsure:
It still does tell us how we the masses are going to benefit by turning back the clock to the good old days. Turning back the clock means a big chunk of the population will have to get off the grid, not so? unless we are going back hand in hand back to the good days of a well run Eskom I just don't see anything to reminisce about.
 
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garp

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I like Gordhan’s thinking. While it will likely achieve nothing much right now, I’m pretty sure that senior management will make damn sure the power stations are fully stocked with coal and running as best as they can for next year’s leave period.

As an aside, I’ve always though that the theory that they’re doing this deliberately to leverage higher rates and bail outs is somewhat conspiratorial, however, I came across this - https://m.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/eskoms-big-coal-whopper-20181204 - which alleges that the coal excuse is rubbish.

Apparently, despite abundant coal in the Witbank/Middelburg area (170 coal mines in a 200km radius) power stations simply stopped accepting coal deliveries some weeks back, and the mines actually have a surplus of available coal.
 

thechamp

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I like Gordhan’s thinking. While it will likely achieve nothing much right now, I’m pretty sure that senior management will make damn sure the power stations are fully stocked with coal and running as best as they can for next year’s leave period.

As an aside, I’ve always though that the theory that they’re doing this deliberately to leverage higher rates and bail outs is somewhat conspiratorial, however, I came across this - https://m.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/eskoms-big-coal-whopper-20181204 - which alleges that the coal excuse is rubbish.

Apparently, despite abundant coal in the Witbank/Middelburg area (170 coal mines in a 200km radius) power stations simply stopped accepting coal deliveries some weeks back, and the mines actually have a surplus of available coal.
I agree, maybe for once someone would be responsible and accountable for something,
Public Enterprises Minister Pravin Gordhan told media on Thursday Christmas leave for senior management has been cancelled and each would be deployed to individual power stations to assess the issues on the ground.
I think people will be scrambling instead of the usual relaxed attitude.
 
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