Government proposes new free-to-air broadcast regulations

Vis1/0N

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DSTV was too expensive so I stopped watching cricket and rugby. Then I stopped following them. I am sure that there are many people out there that can relate. There are less of you paying for it, it is only going to get more expensive. Something has to give. Players salaries, shareholders, or the paying public. DSTV has been a rip off for far too long, sports-persons all over the world has been arguably overpaid in the chase for the best. My wallet cannot stretch any further. Something has to give elsewhere.
 

surfs-up

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Dec 11, 2007
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So who is going to pay for the camera's\production\commentators at the events? Why would DSTV bother to spend the money to buy the broadcasting rights and then give them SABC for free?
The problem in the room is the SABC itself - looking for free handouts again.
The SABC can't pay for the brodcasts they have stolen\wasted\overpaid their cadres- the money is gone- so how do they propose getting the content to broadcast??
Not that I support DSTV in an anyway if they see their ass. I dont care I dont use them I watch on oversea channels.
DSTV ripped of the public when we had no choice now its an more open field and prople don't forget.
Who will pay ? well we all know the answer to that. Government will pay muti-choice for the rights. Where will they get the money ? they will use the money that they will be charging every South African that owns a smartphone, laptop, tablet etc. They will be rich with all the money coming in from the 38 million smartphone owners in SA LOL LOL LOL
 

Moore Morris

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Government proposes new free-to-air broadcast regulations

The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) has published its Draft Sports Broadcasting Services Amendment Regulations for public comment, aiming to make sporting events more accessible to the wider public.

Following the publication of the previous draft regulations, ICASA has published amended draft regulations which include an adapted list of sports that must be made free-to-watch in the public interest.
Imagine all shops having to supply bread, mieliemeal, rice, sugar, milk, etc for free. Reason: they’re of nutritional importance. The most important part is to understand that profession sport is an industry. It’s work. Performance is the same as commodities produced for sale. Wherever government feels that it’s of national interest, then it’s only fair to purchase on behalf of the public. Amateur sport is free and basic should therefore be available for free or at cost. Excessive charges on sport should be subjected to competition rules like all other businesses.
 
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