Hollow Earth / Hollow Planets

3WA

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Sep 25, 2012
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Two questions OP:

1.) How do you explain the fact that seismic waves (P waves) from earthquakes are conveyed throught the earth's interior?

2.) What do you think is the bulk elemental composition of the earth? Do you accept that earth, overall, has the same bulk composition as asteroids and meteorites that amalgamated out of the same source material in the early days of the solar system?
 

Speedster

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All this postulating about hollow earth stuff, what value does it add to one's life? Asking for a friend...
 

rietrot

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Lol nice troll thread.

So far the deeper we go the denser and hotter it gets. Maybe there's a small air/gas bubble somewhere, but thats all the hollow you will get.
Then we also have lava that bubbles to the surface from time to time.
 

Anti-Chris

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Impossible if you think about how the planets formed, except if you really believe earth was created and not formed, then the hollow earth theory will make sense to you... But if you believe that then you might as well believe that the earth is actually some god's kid marble and we are just bacteria living on the surface...
 

rietrot

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Impossible if you think about how the planets formed, except if you really believe earth was created and not formed, then the hollow earth theory will make sense to you... But if you believe that then you might as well believe that the earth is actually some god's kid marble and we are just bacteria living on the surface...
No. The hollow earth isn't a creationist theory, it is a Internet conspiracy one.
 

Speedster

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Impossible if you think about how the planets formed, except if you really believe earth was created and not formed, then the hollow earth theory will make sense to you... But if you believe that then you might as well believe that the earth is actually some god's kid marble and we are just bacteria living on the surface...
Is the alternative to believe that we're just bacteria living on the surface of some random cosmic accident?
 

Norrad

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One simple word "Mass". Gravity isn't affected by the size of an object, but by its mass. By running simple tests in space with objects with known mass (even tools that astronauts use for repairs) their gravitational pull can be observed and calculated. We know what Earth's gravitational pull is and therefore can calculate the Earth's mass.
 

rietrot

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One simple word "Mass". Gravity isn't affected by the size of an object, but by its mass. By running simple tests in space with objects with known mass (even tools that astronauts use for repairs) their gravitational pull can be observed and calculated. We know what Earth's gravitational pull is and therefore can calculate the Earth's mass.
We don't know any mass. We never weight anything in space, all the "known" mass is extrapolation from what we think the earth and elements on earth weigh and how that effects gravity. If the initial assumptions that the earth has a solid core and the weight assigned to it is wrong then all the known masses is also wrong.

Show us a calculation of how much gravitational pull tge space station or any tool astronauts use have. That would be fun. Just a hint. We know for a fact the space station is hollow.
 

Speedster

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We don't know any mass. We never weight anything in space, all the "known" mass is extrapolation from what we think the earth and elements on earth weigh and how that effects gravity. If the initial assumptions that the earth has a solid core and the weight assigned to it is wrong then all the known masses is also wrong.

Show us a calculation of how much gravitational pull tge space station or any tool astronauts use have. That would be fun. Just a hint. We know for a fact the space station is hollow.
To take this a step further, and indulge in the futility of this discussion, when is something considered hollow? Certainly a vacuum would be hollow, but anything else contains at least some matter. How dense does this matter have to be to no longer meet the threshold of hollowness.

Take your example of the space station. While I would agree that it is hollow in a general sense we also know that it is not completely empty. How full of stuff do we need to pack the space station for it no longer to be considered hollow?
 
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gam3jaxx

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Feb 8, 2012
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We don't know any mass. We never weight anything in space, all the "known" mass is extrapolation from what we think the earth and elements on earth weigh and how that effects gravity. If the initial assumptions that the earth has a solid core and the weight assigned to it is wrong then all the known masses is also wrong.

Show us a calculation of how much gravitational pull tge space station or any tool astronauts use have. That would be fun. Just a hint. We know for a fact the space station is hollow.
Good point how hollow is a hollow point?
 

Norrad

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Jul 27, 2004
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We don't know any mass. We never weight anything in space, all the "known" mass is extrapolation from what we think the earth and elements on earth weigh and how that effects gravity. If the initial assumptions that the earth has a solid core and the weight assigned to it is wrong then all the known masses is also wrong.

Show us a calculation of how much gravitational pull tge space station or any tool astronauts use have. That would be fun. Just a hint. We know for a fact the space station is hollow.
At what point did I say weight? You completely lost the scientific argument when you mentioned weight ;)
 
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