Home Brewing / Micro Brewery / My own beer

jibo82

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Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
184
The only problem with all these hobbies is they take up so much cash.

just blew about 150k over the past year on “hobbies” with photography taking up the chunk of it. As soon as I get the hang of one I get bored and want to try something new *sigh*
 

abudabi

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2007
Messages
3,846
If all you want to do is brew a cheaper castle lite, then don't bother. You're probably not going to be able to do it (or your ROI will be way off in the distance).

If however you want to experiment and do craft and specialty import class beers; then yes go ahead. If you do it regularly you will save money and your ROI will be a lot sooner than scenario A above.

Plus homebrewing start-up costs are really not that much if you get your feet wet with a basic setup at first.
 

Mars

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 4, 2006
Messages
10,709
How was the kit from Grain Bucket? I came here to ask if anyone had used them and if it was a good, cheap way to get started and came across your post.
The process was simple, and the beer is really good. My only gripe was that its not easy to bottle out of the tub they give you to ferment in with the pipe to siphon it.

If you only want to make small batches from them the only thing I would change is get a small bucket with a tap on it to make the bottling process simpler.
 

Snyper564

Executive Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
9,222
The process was simple, and the beer is really good. My only gripe was that its not easy to bottle out of the tub they give you to ferment in with the pipe to siphon it.

If you only want to make small batches from them the only thing I would change is get a small bucket with a tap on it to make the bottling process simpler.
I make my own sized bottling buckets for this reason.
 
Joined
May 9, 2012
Messages
9,257
If all you want to do is brew a cheaper castle lite, then don't bother. You're probably not going to be able to do it (or your ROI will be way off in the distance).

If however you want to experiment and do craft and specialty import class beers; then yes go ahead. If you do it regularly you will save money and your ROI will be a lot sooner than scenario A above.

Plus homebrewing start-up costs are really not that much if you get your feet wet with a basic setup at first.

+1
 

InvisibleJim

Expert Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2011
Messages
1,946
The process was simple, and the beer is really good. My only gripe was that its not easy to bottle out of the tub they give you to ferment in with the pipe to siphon it.

If you only want to make small batches from them the only thing I would change is get a small bucket with a tap on it to make the bottling process simpler.
Thanks. I think I will give them a go. Sounds like it will work for getting started.
 

Snyper564

Executive Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
9,222
If all you want to do is brew a cheaper castle lite, then don't bother. You're probably not going to be able to do it (or your ROI will be way off in the distance).

If however you want to experiment and do craft and specialty import class beers; then yes go ahead. If you do it regularly you will save money and your ROI will be a lot sooner than scenario A above.

Plus homebrewing start-up costs are really not that much if you get your feet wet with a basic setup at first.
Start with reusing yeast to reduce costs

This batch about 10L cost the following:

1. Ignore chems
2. Reused yeast
3. Hops: R10
4. Grains: R70ish
5. Ignore actual power consumption/gas
6. RO filtered water

Thats R80 for 10L or 30 X 330ml bottles essentially 5 six packs. Thats craft level beer and its dirt cheap. I do this for the craft not cheap beer and this is still insanely cheap

1627314558779.png
 

SukkaFoo

Expert Member
Joined
May 18, 2008
Messages
1,168
Start with reusing yeast to reduce costs

This batch about 10L cost the following:

1. Ignore chems
2. Reused yeast
3. Hops: R10
4. Grains: R70ish
5. Ignore actual power consumption/gas
6. RO filtered water

Thats R80 for 10L or 30 X 330ml bottles essentially 5 six packs. Thats craft level beer and its dirt cheap. I do this for the craft not cheap beer and this is still insanely cheap

View attachment 1114740

RO is stripped of all minerals. Ignoring chemicals is a bad mistake
 

GAD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
Messages
448
RO is stripped of all minerals. Ignoring chemicals is a bad mistake
...very true...my first ever batch on the GrainFather was simply the best...with tap water.

My second and third batch with RO water and no additions...oh my...what a mistake... HUGE difference and stupid me did it with 3rd batch as well.

Haven't tasted that one yet but at least I know what to expect....never again.

Water profiles for later but for now...."good" old municipal water...the nasties will see their gat in the boil
 

GreGorGy

BULLSFAN
Joined
Jan 18, 2005
Messages
15,257
For anyone who is familiar with water profiles, I need advice. My RO water has the following profile:
Ph 7.4
ECC 170
TDS-PPM 85

That is all I have. What do I need to do to this water to make it good enough for brewing? I have gypsum, epsom and calcium chloride
 

SykomantiS

Expert Member
Joined
May 7, 2012
Messages
3,387
For anyone who is familiar with water profiles, I need advice. My RO water has the following profile:
Ph 7.4
ECC 170
TDS-PPM 85

That is all I have. What do I need to do to this water to make it good enough for brewing? I have gypsum, epsom and calcium chloride
Maybe this will help.
There are a few options you can use, Brewfather has water profiles you can use within each recipe. Bru 'n Water is another one a lot of people are fond of.
 

GreGorGy

BULLSFAN
Joined
Jan 18, 2005
Messages
15,257
Maybe this will help.
There are a few options you can use, Brewfather has water profiles you can use within each recipe. Bru 'n Water is another one a lot of people are fond of.

Thanks - great article. The consensus there seems to be that adding a pH to my kit is well advised. Who uses a pH? I am just gonna get a cheapie from TakeALot.
 

SykomantiS

Expert Member
Joined
May 7, 2012
Messages
3,387
Thanks - great article. The consensus there seems to be that adding a pH to my kit is well advised. Who uses a pH? I am just gonna get a cheapie from TakeALot.
I have a pH meter. Use it almost every brew, but it mostly only confirms I'm in the ball park. I've never needed to adjust the mash pH.
 
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