Home Brewing / Micro Brewery / My own beer

JSparrow

Expert Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2018
Messages
1,233
Bored, can't sleep. Decided to build a Coopers Lager. Trying for 6%. Will see how it turns out
 

Jitters

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2011
Messages
257
Thanks - great article. The consensus there seems to be that adding a pH to my kit is well advised. Who uses a pH? I am just gonna get a cheapie from TakeALot.

Personally I would skip the cheap PH meter, if you are starting from RO water you are starting from a blank known slate. You can add your gypsom and calcium as they reccomend and see if you like the diffrence they make.

For mash ph your starting water has very little ecfect on your mash ph. Its the malts that determine what buffering capacity your mash ph will have and that is calculatable by software like bru n water and brewfather

From the link that snyper posted

I would do the below but half the additions for everything.

Baseline: Add 1 tsp of calcium chloride dihydrate (what your LHBS sells) to each 5 gallons of water treated. Add 2% sauermalz to the grist.

Deviate from the baseline as follows:

For soft water beers (i.e Pils, Helles). Use half the baseline amount of calcium chloride and increase the sauermalz to 3%

For beers that use roast malt (Stout, porter): Skip the sauermalz.

For British beers: Add 1 tsp gypsum as well as 1 tsp calcium chloride

For very minerally beers (Export, Burton ale): Double the calcium chloride and the gypsum.

These recommendations should get you a good beer if not the best beer. To get the best you should vary the amounts of the added salts noting carefully whether a change benefits or detriments your enjoyment of the beer. Additional sulfate will sharpen the perceived hops bitterness. Additional chloride will round, smooth and sweeten the beer. Add or decrease these in small amounts.

[/qoute]
 

SykomantiS

Expert Member
Joined
May 7, 2012
Messages
3,389
Personally I would skip the cheap PH meter, if you are starting from RO water you are starting from a blank known slate. You can add your gypsom and calcium as they reccomend and see if you like the diffrence they make.
Not always true, you only really know your water profile if you had it tested. Our RO system here at home takes the 90-odd ppm TDS that is Pta tap water (which is close to the TDS value of GreGorGy's RO water) and filters it down to 12 TDS, the installer measured it when we had it services 2 months ago. So, even though both sources are RO water, their mineral content still isn't the same.

Even knowing the TDS value still doesn't give you a breakdown of what those solids consist of, and their respective values.

It's really all just guessing until you have an actual water result in your hands. The thread I linked to is supposedly an educated guess as a starting point. I will admit I haven't used that method myself, as Brewfather allows me to make more specific additions if the source water profile is known- if and when I get the chance, I still buy from a shop that has the profile listed- at least partially. Knowing only the TDS value of my own 'RO' water isn't as confidence inspiring as having more detailed info available.
 

bwana

MyBroadband
Super Moderator
Joined
Feb 23, 2005
Messages
82,605
Started this one at 02h15 this morning
How is their stuff? When it comes to extract kits I've only tried Mangrove Jacks and a dry malt extract kit the local brew shop put together. And of course the wort from the brewery.
 

GreGorGy

BULLSFAN
Joined
Jan 18, 2005
Messages
15,257
Mmmm - interesting points these. And importantly, they have reminded me to go back to my early thinking which has not yet faulted me: do smaller (10L) batches when experimenting with something until you either get it right or know how to do it right before ruining a much bigger brew. I am going to get the cheap pH anyway - it is nice to have a record of these things while I experiment and it should be good enough for that. At least it is cheap enough not to have too much regret if I end up having to toss it.

On the spunding front, I think I may have built one using air compressor parts:

Gas line===>Tradeair TOOC346 Coupler===>Tradeair PAB1220 Pressure Regulator (6.35mm)===>SAFETY VALVE ¼" ADJUSTABLE GAV GIO4002-1

MY only concern is the resolution on the gauge. Any reason why this won't work?



 

GreGorGy

BULLSFAN
Joined
Jan 18, 2005
Messages
15,257
Started this one at 02h15 this morning

Is your conscience plaguing you? :ROFL:

If I try brew at that time you can be guaranteed I am throwing out a batch a week later. Although, I did once start an all grain around 20h00 that was only in fermentors well past midnight that turned out delicious.
 

Jitters

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2011
Messages
257
Not always true, you only really know your water profile if you had it tested. Our RO system here at home takes the 90-odd ppm TDS that is Pta tap water (which is close to the TDS value of GreGorGy's RO water) and filters it down to 12 TDS, the installer measured it when we had it services 2 months ago. So, even though both sources are RO water, their mineral content still isn't the same.

Even knowing the TDS value still doesn't give you a breakdown of what those solids consist of, and their respective values.

It's really all just guessing until you have an actual water result in your hands. The thread I linked to is supposedly an educated guess as a starting point. I will admit I haven't used that method myself, as Brewfather allows me to make more specific additions if the source water profile is known- if and when I get the chance, I still buy from a shop that has the profile listed- at least partially. Knowing only the TDS value of my own 'RO' water isn't as confidence inspiring as having more detailed info available.

Ahh fair enough, I dont have a home system. I buy from a shop that has a fairly complete report.

Thanks for the detailed reply I was debating whether to get a home system but its sounding more and more like the shop is the way to go.
 

SykomantiS

Expert Member
Joined
May 7, 2012
Messages
3,389
Ahh fair enough, I dont have a home system. I buy from a shop that has a fairly complete report.

Thanks for the detailed reply I was debating whether to get a home system but its sounding more and more like the shop is the way to go.
Well, I think buying water from a shop might be the easier way (for brewing water only), and at least initially cheaper. Getting a home RO system is a lot of up front costs, not including paying for the water analysis. Then there's also the services to keep in mind. I'm not even sure there is a break even point regarding costs vs buying from a shop- there may be, but I haven't bothered to try and do the math. Where the difference comes in, at least for us, is having access to RO water all the time, for cooking, coffee, drinking, brewing... The convenience factor is what I believe will swing it (or not).
 

Mars

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 4, 2006
Messages
10,709
How do you guys wash your bottles? I have just stuck a whole lot into the dish washer but I'm not sure if thats going to work.
 

Steamy Tom

Executive Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2019
Messages
7,622
How do you guys wash your bottles? I have just stuck a whole lot into the dish washer but I'm not sure if thats going to work.

a lot of guys do that, and i beleive it works well to clean and sanitize. i just wonder how the hell you fit 48 bottles in a dishwasher, there is space sure, but how do you prop them all up etc
 

SykomantiS

Expert Member
Joined
May 7, 2012
Messages
3,389
I rinse out a bottle immediately after use, and wash them after the beer is consumed (sae day / next day), instead of waiting for a batch and making a lot of work for myself. Then come bottling day, I'll rinse and sanitize them. Though I keg now, I still bottle maybe 6 or so from the leftovers in the fermenter.
 

Steamy Tom

Executive Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2019
Messages
7,622
I rinse out a bottle immediately after use, and wash them after the beer is consumed (sae day / next day), instead of waiting for a batch and making a lot of work for myself. Then come bottling day, I'll rinse and sanitize them. Though I keg now, I still bottle maybe 6 or so from the leftovers in the fermenter.

i do this, whenever i use a bottle i immediately rinse it, then bottling day cleaning is far easier but still a chore to go through each bottle
 

Snyper564

Executive Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
9,231
How do you guys wash your bottles? I have just stuck a whole lot into the dish washer but I'm not sure if thats going to work.
I no longer use the dishwasher, the soap messes with head retention I rinse it properly after drinking then clean with oxy cleaner and sanitize on day of bottling.

I have 2 bottled batches with almost no head retention because of the dishwasher.
 

Steamy Tom

Executive Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2019
Messages
7,622
I no longer use the dishwasher, the soap messes with head retention I rinse it properly after drinking then clean with oxy cleaner and sanitize on day of bottling

some guys run it twice, once with soap, once without. on the hottest setting
 

Mars

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 4, 2006
Messages
10,709
Yea, I sanitise on the day of bottling, but I was washing the bottles used over the weekend. I think I'll start rinsing them as I use them, it seems easier.
 
Top