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menticide

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Welcome to the thread, seems like you really know your stuff!

What is the flavour profile of HA-18? What's the beer taste? I've used Kveik Voss a few times and it does give a great beer, sometimes gives a slightly odd flavour though.
It doesn't have the overbearing citrus problem inherent to Kveik Voss. The ester / phenol profile can be manipulated a lot like it can with other yeasts that are capable of more pronounced ester / phenol production.

For example:
If I want to play with the flavour profile of a typical Hefeweizen; I'd manipulate that by adjusting the amount of wheat to barley ratio; more wheat typically equates to more esters, less wheat equates to more phenols; similarly temperature of fermentation impacts (higher == esters, lower == phenols) and also open vs. close fermentation (open == more esters, closed == more phenols).

HA-18 is essentially just a beer yeast strain (i.e. Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a high alcohol tolerance, and similar to kveik is able to ferment at high temperatures without the negatives consequences other Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

It also includes Glucoamylase which basically ramps up the attenuation of your brew / ferment because it's able to break down much longer chain starches than are typically broken down in a mash. Which naturally results in naturally a more dry outcome, because there are less unconverted sugar chains.

If you have a favourite yeast, you can stay with that and just add Glucoamylase either in mash or afterwards in the fermenter as it done with HA-18 yeast / enzyme mix.

Anyway don't just take my word for it on HA-18... here is a review by WheatyBrewingCorps (an Aussie brewer in Adelaide that experiments a lot; @Snyper564 could probably glean some good ideas from them):
And work they did. By name, by nature - Brut kept fermenting into negative Plato territory - finishing at a monster 9.8% ABV. Looks like a Pils, smells like a IIPA and tastes like something altogether different. Big Hop flavour, smooth boozy body and a bone dry finish with almost no bitterness. Dry, dry, dry - but for the sweetness and mouthfeel of big ABV and hops. A gentle giant.
 
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menticide

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Last big beer for the year is done and dusted.

View attachment 1158236
In addition to the above the following was added at flame out and to fermenter
82g Cherries, pineapple, crystalized ginger, raisins and cranberries
22g Chamomile flowers

Beautiful dark red hue

Ended at 1088 pitched onto the US05 the cream ale just finished with and its been bubbling away within the hour I plan to pop one or two bottles this Christmas then store the rest for a few years to come.

View attachment 1158238
I just noticed the size of your batch (9L) in correlation to the chamomile? Is that not a lot of chamomile to add?
A teabag is typically 2g; so about 11 bags?
 

Snyper564

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I just noticed the size of your batch (9L) in correlation to the chamomile? Is that not a lot of chamomile to add?
A teabag is typically 2g; so about 11 bags?
Tweaked the malt bill slightly but followed the rest of the recipe from


Where they used 45g for 19l.

Haven't used chamomile enough to know if it is or isn't. But these are pure chamomile flowers.
 

menticide

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Tweaked the malt bill slightly but followed the rest of the recipe from


Where they used 45g for 19l.

Haven't used chamomile enough to know if it is or isn't. But these are pure chamomile flowers.
Fresh flowers would be different, as much of the weight would be water mass; whereas dried flowers would be more akin to a teabag; both re weight and flavour. I've been rather cautious to overdo any flavourings (maybe too cautious it seems)... anyway let us know how this pans out.

I've recently planted a number of plants that are used to make tea; which I'll also be using to flavour beers and ciders, amongst others I now have recently added: honeybush, peppermint, lavender, chamomile, mint, jasmine, darjeeling, gooseberries, black berries, kumquats, fennel, thyme, sage, basil, lemongrass, ginger, and passion fruit (granadilla).
 
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Snyper564

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Fresh flowers would be different, as much of the weight would be water mass; whereas dried flowers would be more akin to a teabag; both re weight and flavour.

I've been rather cautious to overdo any flavourings (maybe too cautious)... anyway let us know how this pans out.
Mmm, this was the dried version... hope its not too much. But will give feedback once its bottled.
 

menticide

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Mmm, this was the dried version... hope its not too much. But will give feedback once its bottled.
If you have a sodastream or similar you could always carbonate 1 bottle as a tester... that way if its too pungent, you could hold your batch back, and use as a mixer with a future plain brew, for example: with a Pilsner -- which again I'd advise mixing 1 bottle to determine what ratio of each works best.
 

menticide

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Peach Sherry
  • Fermentation / Ageing: 6 months (5.5 months "breathing" ageing)
  • Back-sweeten: From 0.994 to 1.010; on the cusp of a medium dry with a subtle hint of sweetness
  • ABV: 18% (it warms the cockles of your heart)
  • PH: 3.42 (in the ball park of the PH of a Chardonnay)
  • Batch size: 20 litres (+/- 26 x 750ml bottles)
  • Verdict: Yummy; this won't last 6 months. Will most definitely be making more with this year's peach / nectarine harvest; also considering a second 20 litre batch from a mix of nectarine, peach, apricot and plum.
DSC_1037.jpg DSC_1027.jpg
Note:
The "breathing" fermentation is accomplished by using an airlock with no liquid and no cap; instead of the cap, the opening is closed with some gauze to allow the sherry to breath over the 6 months of ageing; which helps to develop the sherry profile and of course keep the bugs out. It's the exact opposite of what is typically done with wines and beers, where exposure to air can spoil it.

Back-sweetening and PH
The decision of how much to back-sweeten is based on more than just taste alone; the PH most definitely comes into play, because the more acidic a wine / sherry is, the more back-sweetening it can handle; the perception of over sweetening in an alcohol drink is directly tied to whether the back-sweetening has completely overpowered the acidity.

Naturally our ability to perceive the acidity of a drink can be manipulated through back-sweetening; but there's a limit to how much sugar a drink can mask before it's perceived as simply too sweet.

The diagram below provides a correlation between acidity and level of back-sweetening that typically accompany popular drinks; soft drinks aren't usually perceived to be as acidic as wines; yet they are; it's the sugar that confuses our ability to perceive this; and its the high acidity of the soft drink that allows it to be heavily back-sweetened without the drink being perceived as too sweet. Hence PH is a good gauge for how much back-sweetening your brew can tolerate; with my sherry having a PH of 3.42 prior to back-sweetening; it's clear that it can tolerate back-sweetening more similar to that of full bodied red and white wines. My choice of 1.010 is based on that, to have the slightest perception of sweetness whilst still being able to perceive the acidity as you can with a full bodied wine.
acidity-ph-level-in-wine-and-drinks

Aside from the starting ingredients in a our brews and that added during fermentation; we also have the ability to manipulate PH afterwards by adding in more of the acids / alkalines to our drinks, for example:
  1. Acids (raise acidity, lower alkalinity): Tartaric, Citric and Malic acid (bitterness and sourness)
  2. Alkalines (lower acidity, raise alkalinity): Potassium Carbonate and Bicarbonate of Soda (saltiness)
Basically in a similar vein to what's done with food preparation; skilled brewers also adjust their recipes to effect the five flavour elements; sweet, salty, bitterness, sourness (acidity) and umami.

Milk Stouts
A simple example is the adding of lactose to a stout; to make a milk stout... it's was traditionally done to balance the increased acidity from brewing with roasted grains; basically it's added to make it more palatable (i.e. perception of less acidity).

Hint: Never pitch these directly into your batch; always extract a small amount e.g. 375ml or 750ml and do the testing with that instead. Then pass that and an unaltered one around so more than one palate can determine if it's a good change to make.

Final Changes
Yesterday's assessment was done on a test batch of 750ml; tonight I back-sweetened the full batch and in tasting I decided to rather back-sweeten to 1.008 instead of 1.010; also I caramelised the back-sweetening sugar to a dark amber; the combination when compare to last night's test batch was far superior... yesterday's was just a little too sweet, and a little less acidic in comparison. The changes are now locked in, and the batch will be bottled this weekend.
 
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Snyper564

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If you have a sodastream or similar you could always carbonate 1 bottle as a tester... that way if its too pungent, you could hold your batch back, and use as a mixer with a future plain brew, for example: with a Pilsner -- which again I'd advise mixing 1 bottle to determine what ratio of each works best.
Thanks much appreciated will definitely bear this in mind if it goes that route
 

Snyper564

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If you have a sodastream or similar you could always carbonate 1 bottle as a tester... that way if its too pungent, you could hold your batch back, and use as a mixer with a future plain brew, for example: with a Pilsner -- which again I'd advise mixing 1 bottle to determine what ratio of each works best.
So batch is at 1016 (around 9.5%) now will let it sit another week or 2 to finish up had a small sample yesterday and happy with the taste. Nothing tastes to over powering so I think it will be fine.
 

Snyper564

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Fruitcake ale fermentation seems complete at 1015 (9.8%) beautiful "alelike" color with redish hue. This is going to be one beautiful beer to age. Subtle spice nice perfectly complemented with touch of ginger (NOT GINGERBEER)

Smoked S'more porter also done fermenting at 1028 (8.72%) its a pastry porter and was mashed on the high 68/69 side. Taste is quite complex, happy with where its at will add lactose and vanilla soaked in whiskey and bottle over the weekend.

Sample shots below

1633640660939.png
 

menticide

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DSC_1045.JPG
Sweet Milk Stout
Verdict: Yummy :cool: (aka it's a huge success)
Next step adjust recipe for 200 litre batch.

BeerSGFG prior yeastsFG with HA-18Duration re HA-18
ABV​
Sweet Milk Stout1.0541.0171.008~1.5 days
6.56%​

Still to taste (Tomorrow / Tuesday):
  • Dunkelweizen
  • Kolsch
  • Chocolate Milk IPA
 

Snyper564

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Cream ale with instant rice was a success refreshing dry and crisp with a touch of lemon from the moutouka hops.

This is 6.2% its deceptive
smile_33.gif


It finished conditioning yesterday and was in the fridge overnight - will be crystal clear in no time

1634219400748.png
 

Pineapple Smurf

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I bought my temperature controller like this 10 years ago and it is awesome in winter, I have my single electric blanket wrapped around 2 fermenters and it works like a bomb, just beware there are Chinese fakes out there on eBay and such places. There is a website somewhere that tells you how to spot a fake

This is a damn good price at R299, they are usually a lot more than this, and the company is legit, I have been there a few times


1634721862864.png
 

Jitters

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I bought my temperature controller like this 10 years ago and it is awesome in winter, I have my single electric blanket wrapped around 2 fermenters and it works like a bomb, just beware there are Chinese fakes out there on eBay and such places. There is a website somewhere that tells you how to spot a fake

This is a damn good price at R299, they are usually a lot more than this, and the company is legit, I have been there a few times


View attachment 1171066
you are more than likely to just find fakes now. They have swamped the market and at the R300 price point you are assured that it's a fakey.

It doesnt really matter tho. I have a real one and a fake and they work equally well.
 

Pineapple Smurf

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you are more than likely to just find fakes now. They have swamped the market and at the R300 price point you are assured that it's a fakey.

It doesnt really matter tho. I have a real one and a fake and they work equally well.
Oh cool, good to know that the fake at least works
These things are awesome
 
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