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Jitters

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Trying my hand at cold crashing - only in a cooler with ice/ice bricks. It's currently hovering at 3 or 4° - how long do I keep it at these temps for?

View attachment 1202372

Longer is better. You can also add some gelatine to help clarify the beer faster, personally I've found if I just cold crash at 0C that I need to wait about 5 days, 2 days with gelatine, but tbh the longer you wait the clearer the beer is so I generally wait 5 days regardless.

If I'm in a rush then patience is not a virtue and I go 1 day, the gelatine does the work in the bottle.
 

Jitters

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Thanks - do I then bring it back up to room temp before I bottle?

Also - when I prime it I usually calculate the amount based on room temp - is that still the same?

No you dont need to bring up to room temp.

Yes, you take the highest temp that your beer was post fermentation as co2 absorbtion is a function of temp.

As the yeast is dormant after the cold crash I usually throw the priming solution in with the gelatine,no stirring, less risk of extra oxygen and I do this 2 days before bottling so that it can mix by itself.
 

bwana

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No you dont need to bring up to room temp.

Yes, you take the highest temp that your beer was post fermentation as co2 absorbtion is a function of temp.

As the yeast is dormant after the cold crash I usually throw the priming solution in with the gelatine,no stirring, less risk of extra oxygen and I do this 2 days before bottling so that it can mix by itself.
Thanks - that's really helpful.
 
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You need to gelatin fine after cold crash, it does nothing if the beer is warmer than like 7C but the colder the better.

Cold crash - gelatin - 1 or 2 days - priming sugar - package - leave at room temp for a couple weeks

Yeast will wake up, also priming sugar needs to be added in directly before packaging or it'll throw the carb calcs completely out as fermentation will start before you get it into a bottle.
 

Dimpie (COMPUTEK)

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^
- Many brewers gelatine fine at room temps ... takes longer, but also works.

- Secondary fermentation is also unlikely to start if you add your priming sugar at cold crash temp which is suppose to be as close to freezing temp as possible ... I think Jitters adds his gelatine and priming sugars all at the same time. :thumbsup:
 

Dimpie (COMPUTEK)

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Cocked up when ordering my hops so having to do a "kitchen sink" ipa. Just chuck in whatever I have left, Cascade, mosaic, Simcoe, Citra, centennial and Amarillo.

I did one like that once with leftover hops .... my dad said this is a great beer, you should make it again .... I said "erm, not possible, have no idea on the amounts of hops"

... I mixed all the hops together and split the lot into different hop additions. :thumbsup:
 
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I did one like that once with leftover hops .... my dad said this is a great beer, you should make it again .... I said "erm, not possible, have no idea on the amounts of hops"

... I mixed all the hops together and split the lot into different hop additions. :thumbsup:

Did the same, probably going to be awesome, at least my hop container is empty now for my next order
 

bwana

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Just make your own starter

I collected the yeast from my most recent batch of Irish Red and was thinking about using it to bake some bread tomorrow. Any idea how much I should use?
 
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I collected the yeast from my most recent batch of Irish Red and was thinking about using it to bake some bread tomorrow. Any idea how much I should use?

I wouldn't, baking and brewing yeasts are bred for very different purposes.

The spent grain would be better than using the yeast.
 

bwana

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I wouldn't, baking and brewing yeasts are bred for very different purposes.
Oh, I'm going to at least try it.

Worst case I waste R5 worth of flour. Best case I end up with a nice ciabatta on Saturday. :)

I'll go with 50ml I guess.
 

B-1

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I collected the yeast from my most recent batch of Irish Red and was thinking about using it to bake some bread tomorrow. Any idea how much I should use?

Thats quite hard to tell without knowing the yeast to trub ratio, viability and ability to break down wheat starch etc. Making a starter tonight is probably a good idea to see how well it does before you try a whole bread.
I would do 50g yeast slurry, 50g flour and 25g water as a starter and see how it looks in the morning. If its nice and bubbly you can use 50-100g of the starter in a +-500g bread. More starter should have a stronger flavour.
The bread itself will probably take as long as a typical sourdough.
 

bwana

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Thats quite hard to tell without knowing the yeast to trub ratio, viability and ability to break down wheat starch etc. Making a starter tonight is probably a good idea to see how well it does before you try a whole bread.
I would do 50g yeast slurry, 50g flour and 25g water as a starter and see how it looks in the morning. If its nice and bubbly you can use 50-100g of the starter in a +-500g bread. More starter should have a stronger flavour.
The bread itself will probably take as long as a typical sourdough.
Sounds like a plan.
 

B-1

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You can also cheat. Do a bulk ferment with the beer yeast and if its looking a bit sad mix some instant yeast, water and sugar and knead it into the dough 1hour before baking time. Then you still get some interesting flavour but it rises like a normal bread.
 
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You can also cheat. Do a bulk ferment with the beer yeast and if its looking a bit sad mix some instant yeast, water and sugar and knead it into the dough 1hour before baking time. Then you still get some interesting flavour but it rises like a normal bread.

That sounds like a plan
 

bwana

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You can also cheat. Do a bulk ferment with the beer yeast and if its looking a bit sad mix some instant yeast, water and sugar and knead it into the dough 1hour before baking time. Then you still get some interesting flavour but it rises like a normal bread.
I'll take some pics in the morning - it looked really dry so I doubled the water to 50ml. I'm using my no-knead recipe which calls for 24hours
 
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Snyper564

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I collected the yeast from my most recent batch of Irish Red and was thinking about using it to bake some bread tomorrow. Any idea how much I should use?
Actually I have successfully made bread using Kveik yeast I would create a "starter".

Take a spoon of the liquid yeast and add it to 50g flour and 50g water then let it rise overnight and use that to "inoculate" your bread tomorrow.

The bread I made was some seriously delicious bread you will need to play by sight as it may be quick or a few hours of rising.

I see similar suggestions above.

To be honest if you can wait till saturday make the starter tonight then dump half the starter and add another 50g water/flour in the morning and same process in the evening and make the bread saturday morning. I did a few rounds of sourdough style starters like this and then made the bread. Should be super bubbly tomorrow morning already.
 
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