Hong Kong extradition protests leave city in shock

DreamKing

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Jul 23, 2009
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9,061
#1
Authorities have shut some government offices in Hong Kong's financial district after the worst violence the city has seen in decades.

By Thursday morning the crowds had largely dispersed around government headquarters - where police and protesters had pitched battles on Wednesday.

The protesters are angry about plans to allow extradition to mainland China.

Despite the widespread opposition, the government has not backed down.

However, Hong Kong's Legislative Council (LegCo) delayed a second reading of the controversial extradition bill and it is unclear when it will take place.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-48618484
 

GreatWmR

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Jul 7, 2016
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282
#6
Only criminals would protest against extradition.
normally i would agree with you but given how this has played out with china its probably just a ploy for the CCP to use for there own political benefit

and the Hong Kong leader is a real B****
 

prOd

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Nov 11, 2009
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3,062
#9
We were in HK last year and planned on going back this year., really loved our time there. Sad to see what's happening but glad to see the people standing up for their rights and freedoms, not that it will make much difference in the end :/

I'm not sure if you're being sarcastic but it is pretty shocking. If/when this law passes there will be no difference between mainland China and HK in terms of the reach of law China has, it's pretty scary and the people there are obviously not happy about it
 

koffiejunkie

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Aug 23, 2004
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9,061
#11
Only criminals would protest against extradition.
Extradition to a country that's not known for its sterling human rights track record? A country whose courts have a 99.9% conviction rate? No.

There are lots of things that are illegal in China that are not just legal in Hong Kong, but in some cases explicitly protected under Hong Kong Basic law. This change will allow China to request extradition of people who were engaged in perfectly legal conduct in Hong Kong (or elsewhere in the world), even if they've never set foot in China.

And while Hong Kong's judiciary is, as far as we can tell, not compromised by the pro-Beijing crowd, the government very much is, so it's only a matter of time.
 

Sollie

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Apr 20, 2005
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#12
https://www.citynews1130.com/2019/0...-94-taiwanese-to-china-on-phone-scam-charges/

Spain extradites 94 Taiwanese to China on phone scam charges
BEIJING — A group of 94 Taiwanese accused of telephone and online fraud have arrived in China after being extradited from Spain.

Chinese authorities say the suspects arrived Friday morning at Beijing airport on a chartered flight. Footage on state broadcaster CCTV showed officers escorting them off the plane one-by-one.

The extraditions stem from joint Chinese and Spanish police raids in December 2016 on 13 operations in several Spanish cities. Spain has extradited 225 suspects to date, of which 218 are Taiwanese.

The scams operate from several countries and usually target Chinese. The callers typically masquerade as Chinese authorities and demand or persuade the victims to transfer money to the scammers’ accounts.

Taiwan has protested the extraditions in the past, saying the accused should be sent to Taiwan, not China.

The Associated Press
 

koffiejunkie

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Aug 23, 2004
Messages
9,061
#18
It's unfortunate that the protestors turned to vandalism. This gives the gov/police justification of pushing back harder.
 
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