'Hotspot' gantries charge up to R6.50

LazyLion

King of de Jungle
Joined
Mar 17, 2005
Messages
104,302
http://www.iol.co.za/motoring/industry-news/hotspot-gantries-charge-up-to-r6-50-1.1277473

Driving through two of Johannesburg’s busiest interchanges - Allandale and Gillooly’s - will cost more than R6 each time you pass through their e-toll gantries - if you’re not registered as an e-toll user.

This drops to nearly half, however, if you are registered and an e-tag user.

In what appears to be a mad dash to legalise e-tolling, motorists have found out only now what the real toll tariffs are going to be, and there is still no clarification on whether taxis and buses will be exempt as promised.

E-tolling is due to kick off on April 30.

A gazette on toll tariffs published on Friday surprised Gauteng drivers, not only because users who are not registered with the SA National Roads Agency Ltd as tollpayers and who take longer than seven days to pay tolls will be charged six times the amount of the most-discounted tariff, but also because of the widely differing charges for the gantries.

The standard charges range from R1.16 for Ilowe gantry on the N1 to R8.12 for Letata, near Olifantsfontein, for cars to R40.60 at Letata as a standard charge for trucks. Punitive tariffs are far higher.

Allandale’s Sunbird gantry costs R6.50 for a standard user and R3.36 for a registered e-tag user, while Gillooly’s Loerie gantry costs R6.38 for a standard user and R3.30 for a registered e-tag user.

Adding up all the tariffs for the 49 gantries, and dividing it by the round route of 370km of the e-tolled roads, also gives a higher per kilometre rate than the 30c promised by the cabinet earlier this year for e-toll users.

AS HIGH AS R2 A KILOMETRE

This instead comes to 34c/km, while standard users will pay R1.22. This is almost double the amount that motorists were told they would pay per kilometre just one year ago.

In February 2011 Sanral CEO Nazir Alli announced that e-tag users for ordinary vehicles would pay 49.5c/km, while regular users would pay 66c/km.

Now, according to The Star’s calculations, if a non-registered user does not pay within seven days, this figure jumps to as high as R2 per kilometre.

Explaining this, Sanral said the tolls would be collected per gantry that a motorists passed and that the cost per gantry was determined by the kilometre distance between gantries.

“The practical implication of this toll strategy is that in some instances road users might travel on the tolled route but exit the system before passing a gantry, which would mean a ‘free ride’. However, on the return trip, a road user might pass a gantry for which they will be charged, thus balancing the cost,” Sanral said.

The DA’s Neil Campbell said he was not surprised by figures that appear higher than promised.

“We also find it very disturbing that the standard rate is double what it should be.”

“This is a desperate attempt to push people into buying an e-tag.”

Surprisingly, the gazette had no mention of users who will be exempt from paying tolls.

In August 2011 the government announced that taxis and buses would not have to pay e-tolls. This was reiterated in February by the cabinet.

Wayne Duvenage, the chairman of Outa (Opposition to Urban Tolling Alliance), who is attempting to stop e-tolling through a court process, points out that with no details on exemptions so close to e-tolling’s commencement, “it must be assumed that they are in fact not exempt”.

“The absence of clarity on the criteria for exemptions has further implications for both vulnerable groups (eg pensioners or mobility impaired). In addition, the tourism industry, which has numerous permitted vehicles and drivers similar to minibus taxi operators, has good reason to expect that it should also qualify for exemptions,” Duvenage said.

The tariffs gazetted a year ago - hotly disputed and now overtaken by Friday’s gazette - referred to “public transport discount” for “qualifying public transport vehicles that have an e-toll tag account and a valid permit” for a public transport vehicle.

EXEMPTION PROCESS NOT FINALISED YET

On Monday national department of transport spokesman Tiyani Rikhotso insisted that public transport would be exempt, but did not explain how this would work.

Thabisho Molelekwa, spokesman for the SA National Taxi Council, was confident the government would not renege on its promise to exempt taxis. He said they had been in consultation with Sanral on how taxis would be registered and exempted, but admitted this process had not been finalised yet.

“The regulations for exemption are currently with the department of transport for review. Included in this exemption is the exemption of commuter public transport operators,” said Sanral spokesman Felix Sebata. - The Star
 

Mila

Honorary Master
Joined
Nov 11, 2008
Messages
54,969
taxi's will love this.

How many do you think have licenses for transporting people?
 

DJ...

Banned
Joined
Jan 24, 2007
Messages
70,287
And why the price variation? I suspect that there is absolutely no way for them to justify this. As usual. I sniff an update to the legal action...
 

Ricard

Expert Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2007
Messages
2,803
taxi's will love this.

How many do you think have licenses for transporting people?

The plot thickens.... Taxis have to register for excemption.... then SARS can go after the owners for TAX :D
 

daveza

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 5, 2004
Messages
45,354
The plot thickens.... Taxis have to register for excemption.... then SARS can go after the owners for TAX :D

Every taxi in the country is going to register - I don't think so.
 

DJ...

Banned
Joined
Jan 24, 2007
Messages
70,287
The plot thickens.... Taxis have to register for excemption.... then SARS can go after the owners for TAX :D

They have been trying to do this for years now. I foresee groot kak...
 

IzZzy

Executive Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2004
Messages
5,911
SANRAL has lost what little respect they had. If they were a poker player, they would have lost by now as they have played their hand by showing us how much it means to them to have people buy e-tags. They are hugely vulnerable and they know it.

I sad to say my GF's parents admitted to buying e-tags, sigh.

Oh and "public transport discount" is not the same as "public transport exemption".
 

blunomore

Honorary Master
Joined
Jul 8, 2007
Messages
26,789
I need to be honest and say upfront that I have not been following every episode of the e-tag soap opera.

How can these two gantries cost R6 each? I though the charges are per km ?

And what is the status on those unfortunate visitors from out of the province? Hwo are they dealt with?
 

daveza

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 5, 2004
Messages
45,354

hellfire

Honorary Master
Joined
Sep 25, 2007
Messages
11,388
I need to be honest and say upfront that I have not been following every episode of the e-tag soap opera.

How can these two gantries cost R6 each? I though the charges are per km ?

And what is the status on those unfortunate visitors from out of the province? Hwo are they dealt with?

Each gantry pays for a 'piece' of the highway. So even if you get on at the M1n Buccleach interchange and get off at Allandale, you will be tolled as if you had come from N3 Marlboro and were getting off at New Road.

Adding up all the tariffs for the 49 gantries, and dividing it by the round route of 370km of the e-tolled roads, also gives a higher per kilometre rate than the 30c promised by the cabinet earlier this year for e-toll users.
 

grok

Honorary Master
Joined
Dec 20, 2007
Messages
25,287
Each gantry pays for a 'piece' of the highway. So even if you get on at the M1n Buccleach interchange and get off at Allandale, you will be tolled as if you had come from N3 Marlboro and were getting off at New Road.

Seems they lied about that as well ..


Adding up all the tariffs for the 49 gantries, and dividing it by the round route of 370km of the e-tolled roads, also gives a higher per kilometre rate than the 30c promised by the cabinet earlier this year for e-toll users.

This instead comes to 34c/km, while standard users will pay R1.22. This is almost double the amount that motorists were told they would pay per kilometre just one year ago.
 
Top