How much South African game developers earn - "Not a smart move if you care about making money"

The Trutherizer

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I think it was stated more metaphorically. To put things in perspective, I started a paid apprenticeship 16years ago and started out my career with R2000 less after my training
Ha! I started my career 20 years ago and started with R3500 flat. Working for a little "startup" from a guy's home. No formal training (in programming), so it's what I could get.
It was a long hard road to get where I am now where I earn quite a decent salary. Worth it? I just don't know to be honest. I can't imagine taking a different approach. I didn't even have my own home internet for the first 5 years of my career. Couldn't afford it. Of course knowing what I know now I would have done things vastly different. The amount of debt I built up during the first 10 years of my career would have been enough to pay for a uni degree after all. Which I could probably pay back within 2-3 years of starting at a decent job. But I just didn't know. Didn't even have a clue about what I didn't know.

It was sometimes like that back in the day. Aspirant devs coming from families with internet and some connections, maybe even members of the families who were themselves technical professionals, rose like shooting stars. For those coming from the technological boonies it was a non stop slog. It took real will and perseverance.

Even poor kids these days do not know how privileged they really are.
 
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Beyond.Celsus

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Damn
Guess the majority of people on MyBB come from filthy rich families.
If I told my dad back in the day that I'm not working, because R12k a month is a 'pittance' he would've chucked me out to live on the streets.
 

koeks525

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@koeks525

You need to realize that not everyone can be in the fortunate position that you’re in to make such choices.

Also, you’re a young black gay person in STEM. You tick all the boxes HR currently looks for.

:whistling:
Shhh, they should not know how I 'dip it and do it' :ROFL: :ROFL:. On a serious note, I expect my prospective employers to evaluate and award me on merit and not by the 'social credentials' I may have.

nene.gif
 

Arandompeer

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I want to know, what separates the higher payed from the lower payed? Is it talent, connections, valuing their time more, etc? Why would a company pay more for one person, when there are many candidates with very similar CVs? What makes that one person an outlier? The answers may vary but it is an interesting topic.
 

cguy

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I want to know, what separates the higher payed from the lower payed? Is it talent, connections, valuing their time more, etc? Why would a company pay more for one person, when there are many candidates with very similar CVs? What makes that one person an outlier? The answers may vary but it is an interesting topic.
By far the biggest differentiator is the company and job requirements of that company itself. The candidate then needs to be able to satisfy these criteria. A SA based company looking for a junior web developer may pay R12k/m, while say, Amazon SA may pay 10x that for a junior hire who did distributed cloud based astronomical signal processing on a GPU as part of their hons/msc or some such.
 

koeks525

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I want to know, what separates the higher payed from the lower payed? Is it talent, connections, valuing their time more, etc? Why would a company pay more for one person, when there are many candidates with very similar CVs? What makes that one person an outlier? The answers may vary but it is an interesting topic.
I do not think the answer to this question is a simple, 1-dimensional answer; if that were the case, every talented and highly skilled developer would be "living it large", which isn't the case, for a range of reasons. I believe amount of money you earn from a company depends on a few pointers (what the company thinks of you, how the company generally views its employees, how 'valuable' you are to the company, the overall state of the company's finances, etc).

Some companies employ policies that make it a little trickier to leave (long waiting periods, money should be paid back if the company paid for your relocation/studies, you cannot work in industries X, Y, Z for reasons A, B and C after leaving the company), while also cutting back on the salaries regardless of skill and talent (legally, our employees cannot work for the competition, why should we bother with a really good deal?).
 

Hamster

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It is better to sit at home and do nothing than to be earning that much. You'll have more problems in your life with such a horrendous salary. If I was earning that much, I would have resigned ages ago and went home.
Dumbest thing I've read all day.
 

Johnatan56

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Damn
Guess the majority of people on MyBB come from filthy rich families.
If I told my dad back in the day that I'm not working, because R12k a month is a 'pittance' he would've chucked me out to live on the streets.
Imagine your kid studied to be a doctor, then after they finish they only earn R12k.

And all income is relative, R12k for that job in CT is garbage, doesn't matter if it's a lot for e.g. a gardener, stop seeing it from that position. Terrible that this is all even warranted a discussion.
 
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Johnatan56

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Ha! I started my career 20 years ago and started with R3500 flat. Working for a little "startup" from a guy's home. No formal training (in programming), so it's what I could get.
It was a long hard road to get where I am now where I earn quite a decent salary. Worth it? I just don't know to be honest. I can't imagine taking a different approach. I didn't even have my own home internet for the first 5 years of my career. Couldn't afford it. Of course knowing what I know now I would have done things vastly different. The amount of debt I built up during the first 10 years of my career would have been enough to pay for a uni degree after all. Which I could probably pay back within 2-3 years of starting at a decent job. But I just didn't know. Didn't even have a clue about what I didn't know.

It was sometimes like that back in the day. Aspirant devs coming from families with internet and some connections, maybe even members of the families who were themselves technical professionals, rose like shooting stars. For those coming from the technological boonies it was a non stop slog. It took real will and perseverance.

Even poor kids these days do not know how privileged they really are.
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That's according to the official CPI, which is lower than real inflation.
 
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