How much you will have to pay to say “Goodbye Eskom”

Polymathic

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I still feel solar panels makes more sense if you are building a new home due to the huge costs. That way the costs would be bundled in your home loan which will give you peace of mind
 

Bighit

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What about wind (PE and other costal towns especially)?

I also thought if this, but then you realise that the massive wind farm at JBay only generates 138MW at most, which is under 14% of the power that is load shedded in stage 1...
 

itareanlnotani

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I also thought if this, but then you realise that the massive wind farm at JBay only generates 138MW at most, which is under 14% of the power that is load shedded in stage 1...

Thats only because the amount allocated was that. Much larger solar/wind generation is viable.
Government only allocates sub 100MW amounts in the most part for renewables though..
See REIPP phase1,2,3,4...



Solar panels are less than 40c a watt in China. Landed is about R7/watt cost, or about R2100 for a 300w panel. Used to be less, but then again, we used to have a worthwhile currency. Now we're using monopoly money almost, as the rand is ever more worthless, sigh.


Panels are cheap imho. While there are local assemblers here (eg making panels with imported silicon), I don't think we have any local manufacturing. To clarify - we do have a few assembly plants - eg imported silicon and local aluminum plus backmounting, but I'm not aware of any silicon manufacturers here.


The rest of the stuff gets expensive 20KW of Lithium is about R50,000 landed cost. Inverters and other bits around R30,000
Then labour (1-2 days odd).

I could knock out a complete offgrid setup for under 150k at the moment -

eg
15 panels - 2100 x 15 = 31500 (15 x 300w)
inverters - 30000 (5kw 48v inverter)
batteries - 50000 (20kw lithium)
Labour + ancillary costs (mounting, misc cabling, electrical) 20000
Profit 20000

If the rand doesn't plummet further, in 2-3 years the battery costs will drop too.

Once I get further along on my new house build, I'll be bringing all that in for myself. Already sourced most of it, and have the MSDS tests done for the batteries, so its close to getting shipped..
 

alkit

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Wish the article had more details in it. What is the wattage of the solar panels, what is the capacity of the batteries? Also, a comparison over 20 years to Eskom pricing would be great.
 

maeztro

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Another problem: "Real-life example: Big family home completely off the grid"
Big family home is no longer a realistic-life example with today's economy. Most of us use way less than R2000 electricity per month so large installations like these make no sense as an example and only put people off.

Most (if not all) the examples I have seen on Carte Blanche and other places, are of people who:
1. Can afford the investment up front
2. Have huge homes
3. Probably consumes a lot more electricity than I do
4. Have a lot more surface area exposed to sun

So, not IMO, at all realistic. My current fear is that by the time the systems are sorted out, that it will only be those who cannot afford to convert to solar, that will be left, paying through our noses to cross subsidize and pay off the debt incurred.
 

oober

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Where do you live to get electricity at R1.07 per kilowatt-hour?

For some reason this is what my bills also work out to. I'm on prepaid. Now that I have solar I'm probably going to use about R200 -R250 worth of power per month vs. the R900+ bill.

I would be able to reduce my bill to 0 if one could do net-metering though, but the current COJ tarrif for net metering would cost me R600+ just in fees.

Edit. Correction I paid R1.13/kwH in December,800 units, and 1.07 for Jan since I only bought 470 units which is below the 500 unit threshold.
 
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maeztro

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Has anyone assessed the implications of going off grid on

1. Sale of the property
2. Property values
3. Home owners insurance - structure

All these scenarios imply going completely off the grid, or with a grid connection.

Has anyone considered a partial system, that can run independent of the rest.

One of the big continual users of electricity in my house is lights. Anyone have an idea of the costs of setting up a parallel system running 12 V LEDs from a solar panel to provide some or all the lighting requirements of an "average" house?

This would negate the need for inverters, connection to the mains systems and have a much lower load requirement. And the need for continually turning off lights as you move through the house. I also think that this would be within reach of most average income families. And would probably add to the selling value of the property, without making it totally unaffordable because you need to recoup your investment.
 

Bighit

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For some reason this is what my bills also work out to. I'm on prepaid. Now that I have solar I'm probably going to use about R200 -R250 worth of power per month vs. the R900+ bill

How much power do you use? If you use <450KW, then it makes sense, but not for 750KW.
 

Hemps

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Just went onto solar geyser on Monday, next step might be to replace lightbulbs with LED, would it make much difference going from energy saver bulbs to led?
 

rrh

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Just went onto solar geyser on Monday, next step might be to replace lightbulbs with LED, would it make much difference going from energy saver bulbs to led?

Step #1 of "going solar" is to reduce your current household electricity bill to a minimum by using a solar geyser, gas for most of your cooking, cutting back on the time that your pool pump runs etc.
 

P924

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Just went onto solar geyser on Monday, next step might be to replace lightbulbs with LED, would it make much difference going from energy saver bulbs to led?
Lumens per watt is very close for cfl and led (in commercially available products), so not much advantage in going led, unless you go with less light output as well.
 

LCBXX

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I reckon it is much less expensive and complicated to get a generator with a source transfer switch. Trip your stove, geyser and pool pump, and off you go. All in with a 5KW genny for under R10k.
 

Jinx10

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I reckon it is much less expensive and complicated to get a generator with a source transfer switch. Trip your stove, geyser and pool pump, and off you go. All in with a 5KW genny for under R10k.

i wen that option. big mistake. then noise is hectic and neighbors even complain. Also lot of admin. make sure its full, make sure its clean...
 

Paul_S

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All these scenarios imply going completely off the grid, or with a grid connection.

Has anyone considered a partial system, that can run independent of the rest.

One of the big continual users of electricity in my house is lights. Anyone have an idea of the costs of setting up a parallel system running 12 V LEDs from a solar panel to provide some or all the lighting requirements of an "average" house?

This would negate the need for inverters, connection to the mains systems and have a much lower load requirement. And the need for continually turning off lights as you move through the house. I also think that this would be within reach of most average income families. And would probably add to the selling value of the property, without making it totally unaffordable because you need to recoup your investment.

A 12V solar PV system just to power lights doesn't make much financial sense because:

1. You still need solar panels and batteries to run the lights at night and these two components make up the majority of the expense. An inverter is a relatively cheap component compare to banks of batteries and solar panel arrays.
2. You need to run a dual supply around the house with some decent gauge wire to handle the current of lots of low voltage lights. That's expensive to do.
3. Lights consume very little power in the average household once converted to LED of CFL so the savings would be marginal.
e.g. With 10 x 10 Watt CFL's running you're only consuming 100 Watts which is less than most large LCD TV's consume let alone the heavier appliances such as fridges/freezers, kettles, etc.
 

LCBXX

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i wen that option. big mistake. then noise is hectic and neighbors even complain. Also lot of admin. make sure its full, make sure its clean...
Why would neighbors complain? Jealousy?
 
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