How much you will have to pay to say “Goodbye Eskom”

raind33r

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I mentioned before a while back, I think we should look into some sort of communal power system in local areas to offset costs(kinda like setting up own fibre networks). The idea would be based on, not everyone uses power at the same time... I don't boil my kettle at exactly the same time you do. If I'm at a mates house having a braai, my panels are being 'wasted' so why can't my neighbour use my solar panels to help out his load etc. If you are in bed at 9pm, why can't I use some of your battery to watch my late night movie. I thought maybe a central battery pool in neighbourhood, each house would have to fork out less for panels and batteries, and due to all panels being networked to battery pool, there would be more available when each house needs it(possibly even having enough panels across neighbourhood to never draw from battery pool during the day). Not sure if its viable, and would need backup for those multiple overcast days, but yeah, just a thought

Wow nice idea. Now that's thinking outside the box.
 

Everyones-a-Wally

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I also thought if this, but then you realise that the massive wind farm at JBay only generates 138MW at most, which is under 14% of the power that is load shedded in stage 1...

Wind power in Scotland is the country's fastest growing renewable energy technology, with 2574 MW of installed capacity as of April 2011

...
At the end of the second quarter in 2014, there was 7,083 megawatts (MW) of installed renewable electricity capacity in Scotland, an increase of 10.5% (or 671 MW) from the end of the second quarter in 2013. Renewable electricity generation in Scotland was 16,974 GWh in 2013, up 16.4% on 2012.[2]
And Scotland is tiny!
 

itareanlnotani

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Quote Originally Posted by ellyally View Post
I mentioned before a while back, I think we should look into some sort of communal power system in local areas to offset costs(kinda like setting up own fibre networks). The idea would be based on, not everyone uses power at the same time... I don't boil my kettle at exactly the same time you do. If I'm at a mates house having a braai, my panels are being 'wasted' so why can't my neighbour use my solar panels to help out his load etc. If you are in bed at 9pm, why can't I use some of your battery to watch my late night movie. I thought maybe a central battery pool in neighbourhood, each house would have to fork out less for panels and batteries, and due to all panels being networked to battery pool, there would be more available when each house needs it(possibly even having enough panels across neighbourhood to never draw from battery pool during the day). Not sure if its viable, and would need backup for those multiple overcast days, but yeah, just a thought

Wow nice idea. Now that's thinking outside the box.

Unfortunately in South Africa its illegal to do that. Only Eskom is allowed to supply electricity.
You can supply for yourself, but you can't supply a neighbour, even if its for free.

It might be viable in a complex (townhouse or flats) though, as thats considered one area vs multiple.
 

Everyones-a-Wally

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Unfortunately in South Africa its illegal to do that. Only Eskom is allowed to supply electricity.
You can supply for yourself, but you can't supply a neighbour, even if its for free.

It might be viable in a complex (townhouse or flats) though, as thats considered one area vs multiple.

Apparently if you supply the grid via a prepaid meter, you are billed since it can't detect the flow direction.
 

Everyones-a-Wally

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That would probably explain the wind farms in the western and eastern Cape then.

Yep, juts not enough $$ being invested. Everything is being run as if it's a pilot - this stuff is tried and tested, no need for us to prove it.
 

Swa

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Just went onto solar geyser on Monday, next step might be to replace lightbulbs with LED, would it make much difference going from energy saver bulbs to led?
Wiki puts the luminous efficacy at 12-63% higher for LED: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_fluorescent_lamp#Efficiency_comparison
So in terms of saving it's about 30% but in absolute terms it's just 4W per bulb. Not worth in for an integrated system. If you're designing around lighting specifically you want to squeeze out every watt you can. Their main attraction is that they last 3 times longer.

Correct me if I am wrong.
Eskom was started out as a NON-PROFIT entity for the people of SA - supplying a service.

Today they a business which is on its knees due to ANC cadre deployment of useless individuals trying to make a quick buck.

Eskom should be non-profit with CEO not raking in massive bonuses from consumers money. All profits should be put back into regeneration.
They aren't making money now. The main problem is the salaries of the management but non-profit entity has nothing to do with the pay of its workers.

Cant they amortise the equipment and installation fees over 5 years? :D

Thanks Makes R230k / 60months = R3.9k per month.

Come to think about it, it's like buying a new house, mxm
That would negate any savings. As it stands batteries have to be replaced at least every 10 years so if you rack up debt the system won't even pay for itself before you need to spend more money on it.

I mentioned before a while back, I think we should look into some sort of communal power system in local areas to offset costs(kinda like setting up own fibre networks). The idea would be based on, not everyone uses power at the same time... I don't boil my kettle at exactly the same time you do. If I'm at a mates house having a braai, my panels are being 'wasted' so why can't my neighbour use my solar panels to help out his load etc. If you are in bed at 9pm, why can't I use some of your battery to watch my late night movie. I thought maybe a central battery pool in neighbourhood, each house would have to fork out less for panels and batteries, and due to all panels being networked to battery pool, there would be more available when each house needs it(possibly even having enough panels across neighbourhood to never draw from battery pool during the day). Not sure if its viable, and would need backup for those multiple overcast days, but yeah, just a thought
See here
 

Seriously

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The technology has its limits. It is best suited for slow and steady operation, not rapidly charging and discharging large amounts of power as some utilities require. And while the batteries are cheaper than other kinds, pairing them with solar panels still can’t beat the economics of conventional power plants in most areas

IMHO not worth it then.
 

Flowerhat

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200 000 for solar system? you mad

Replace geysers with solar, heat pump.

Convert your lights to 12V led

Use battery banks in the night, charge them in the day using grid.

Can do solar installation for R80k (minus the solar geysers) for my home.
 

Swa

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200 000 for solar system? you mad

Replace geysers with solar, heat pump.

Convert your lights to 12V led

Use battery banks in the night, charge them in the day using grid.

Can do solar installation for R80k (minus the solar geysers) for my home.
That's still too much. Get a bi-directional inverter-charger combo if you have a wheel meter and feed into the grid during the day. A battery or two can help you out with load shedding.
 

Sinbad

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That's still too much. Get a bi-directional inverter-charger combo if you have a wheel meter and feed into the grid during the day. A battery or two can help you out with load shedding.
Illegal.
 

Swa

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Where? Please pray tell.
Was looking for the original article saying where they were shipping but this one would have to suffice. After the initial successful pilots in 2012-2013 large scale production was started last year with a new plant.

There's also this. Back to your original objection you highlighted the wrong piece:
The technology has its limits. It is best suited for slow and steady operation, not rapidly charging and discharging large amounts of power as some utilities require.
As you can see the slow and steady operation is actually a 4-hour cycle. Sufficient for domestic use and the improvements to the second generation yields a 40% increase under these conditions.
 

Seriously

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Then illegal equipment is being sold. There are regulations and limits.

It's not illegal to buy the equipment but it's illegal to use it the way you proposed. You have to get permission to tie back in the grid and you may not use any ploy to reverse or slow down the wheel of the old type meters. Suggesting to others to commit a crime is also illegal? ;)
 

Swa

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It's not illegal to buy the equipment but it's illegal to use it the way you proposed. You have to get permission to tie back in the grid and you may not use any ploy to reverse or slow down the wheel of the old type meters. Suggesting to others to commit a crime is also illegal? ;)
As I said there are regulations. We are not referring to ploys to reverse or slow down a wheel.
 
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