How scammers steal money from your online bank account

Good thing we have FICA, all they have to do is look up the owner of the payee account and go round to his place and arrest him... Easy. Peasy.
 
Good thing we have FICA, all they have to do is look up the owner of the payee account and go round to his place and arrest him... Easy. Peasy.

Nope, doesn't work. Most accounts have fake details or otherwise belong to some shack dweller who doesn't have a formal address in the first place. Good luck arresting that.
 
Good thing we have FICA, all they have to do is look up the owner of the payee account and go round to his place and arrest him... Easy. Peasy.


This was a sarcastic post for those who didn't get it.
 
Thanks to this article I will open a separate bank account for online banking, won't use my main account.
 
Bank security isn't top notch. Recently received my Virgin Credit Card, was impatient waiting for the PIN to be sent by ordinary post. Walked into my local branch, and the consultant didn't even ask for any form of identification(did supply ID number, method of payment ).

A new layer of security would be to scan ID documents before proceeding to the next step(viewing personal details work of employment etc). Allow top management to override it.....

I am paranoid. Check my bank accounts daily. Have separate contact numbers for each different bank as safety precaution in the event something we're to happen. I would be able to safety phone the bank to cancel/freeze account..
 
FICA is such a joke. You can just create a fake lease, get 2 of your friends to sign it, and then present that as your "proof" of address. Pointless piece of legislation.
 
With regards to the sim-swop weak link in the chain, I am going to change to email for one time pins as have some other forum members. I've created a new email account and linked it to my phone only, so in the unlikely case that my desktop is compromised, at least the email account password cannot be lifted off the pc (where it has never been used).
 
With regards to the sim-swop weak link in the chain, I am going to change to email for one time pins as have some other forum members. I've created a new email account and linked it to my phone only, so in the unlikely case that my desktop is compromised, at least the email account password cannot be lifted off the pc (where it has never been used).


I assume you'll be using 2 factor authentication.
 
Everyone here a throwing technology or process at the problem. Standard phishing requires the user to compromise their logon details. If users learn not to click on Sars, ebucks, ucount links they won't get scammed.

Most times it's a promise of extra money being paid into their account and they need to "check it". Here is a convenient link to get there....

I don't take any "extra" precautions like special email addresses, password managers, etc. Never had online fraud and never had my cards skimmed/cloned.
 
Not to my sim-swappable phone number! I would prefer to use a very strong password & ssl


Still at risk then, rather have 2 factor authentication with a sim-swappable number then no 2 factor authentication.
 
Having said that though, users are users and no matter how much awareness you do, people will fall for it.

Willing crook, unknowing user...it's a business for a reason I guess.

Some of these phishing sites even have the scam warnings on the spoofed site but people still go ahead.
 
Still at risk then, rather have 2 factor authentication with a sim-swappable number then no 2 factor authentication.

I don't see how an email account with a password of jthg6Bb!Cb2C4UFk1CV%M5ggI!DOg#6rYrMsk31PXNJ5 only accessed by SSL IMAP is at risk. Especially when these criminals are targeting phone numbers with sim swaps and not hacking mail accounts.
 
Everyone here a throwing technology or process at the problem. Standard phishing requires the user to compromise their logon details. If users learn not to click on Sars, ebucks, ucount links they won't get scammed.

Most times it's a promise of extra money being paid into their account and they need to "check it". Here is a convenient link to get there....

I don't take any "extra" precautions like special email addresses, password managers, etc. Never had online fraud and never had my cards skimmed/cloned.

Same here, the most important thing is to just have a strong password , and not click on random links (phishing).
 
I don't see how an email account with a password of jthg6Bb!Cb2C4UFk1CV%M5ggI!DOg#6rYrMsk31PXNJ5 only accessed by SSL IMAP is at risk. Especially when these criminals are targeting phone numbers with sim swaps and not hacking mail accounts.

Well now we have your password. :whistling:
 
Back
Top