Huawei helped African politicians to spy on enemies - Report

km2

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What's the consistent rule here? Are companies not supposed to give access if requested by the local government? If Cisco installs networking equipment in the UK, would they resist a demand by the UK government to enable monitoring of certain traffic?

I could understand the outrage if it was the case of Huawei spying on Africans for the benefit of the Chinese government, but this is a government spying on its own citizens. That the kind of stuff the Five Eyes loves.
 

elf_lord_ZC5

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Yeah, well, if you Chinese company, and you an American company - a different yardstick gets used. When your cellphone gets stolen - you expect the "police" to find it and those who stole it, and then cry fowl, when same tech, that enable your expectations when it is used to track other types of felons ...

Ouch!!

Double standards on both sides of the fence.
 

Chris.Geerdts

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I'm pretty sure that all mobile operators and all network vendors have been approached by dictatorial governments for information on dissidents and political opponents. The consequences of refusing are dire: If you are an expat you face instant deportation; a national faces harassment; a vendor, can be thrown out or have staff deported, and a mobile operator can additional face fines and threats to their licence.

Article headline should be about governments in general applying pressure. But that won't sell WSJ copies
 

Hellhound105

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Cant be,

Orange man bad, Huawei good.

"Thanks for the continued support though"
 

elf_lord_ZC5

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Lol...
Wall Street Journal.

there is no evidence that...
No evidence on any of the so called "spy" allegations - anywhere, FBI fully expected Apple to "unlock" iPhones a few years ago ... , documented in American courts - this is just speculative reporting, that suits Trump and his cronies and their own agendas.
 

RandomGeek

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WhatsApp is end to end encrypted...how does e.g. Huawei manage to get "break" into a WhatsApp group?
Unless the targets had Huawei phones and got compromised via that route?
 

irBosOtter

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WhatsApp is end to end encrypted...how does e.g. Huawei manage to get "break" into a WhatsApp group?
Unless the targets had Huawei phones and got compromised via that route?
Huawei employees helped African governments spy on political opponents by using cell data to track their location and intercepting encrypted communications and social media, a Wall Street Journal investigation found.
The report, which did not find evidence that Huawei executives in China were aware of or approved the activities in Africa, could still add ammunition to the U.S. government’s allegations that Huawei could be used for espionage on behalf of the Chinese government. Huawei has denied these claims, but the U.S. has remained wary of the smartphone maker, with the Department of Justice filing criminal charges in two separate cases in January, alleging its CFO committed wire fraud and violated U.S. sanctions on Iran and that the company stole trade secrets from T-Mobile.

The WSJ investigation did not find evidence of spying activity by or on behalf of the Chinese government in Africa. It also did not find any unique features in Huawei’s technology that allowed spying activity to occur.

In two separate cases in Uganda and Zambia, the Journal found that Huawei employees used its technology to aid domestic spying on behalf of governments in those countries. Huawei technicians working in Uganda’s police headquarters office used Pegasus spyware made by Israei company NSO Group to crack into the encrypted messages of a rapper-turned-activist named Bobi Wine, the Journal investigation initially reported. (The WSJ later corrected its article to reflect that the software was “Pegasus-style spyware” created by unknown other parties, not actually the Pegasus software from NSO.). A cyber team based at the Ugandan police headquarters asked the Huawei technicians for help after failing to access the encrypted messages using the spyware, security officials told the Journal.
 

elf_lord_ZC5

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WhatsApp is end to end encrypted...how does e.g. Huawei manage to get "break" into a WhatsApp group?
Unless the targets had Huawei phones and got compromised via that route?
What's app might be encrypted, but cell towers can triangulate your location, map your movements, record who you call, how often, what time, how long, and Vodacom/MTN/Cell-C/Telkom, do not need Huawei collusion to supply that information.

They can decrypt any voice calls you make, also without Huawei's help, or Nokia, or Ericsson.
 

elf_lord_ZC5

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Huawei employees helped African governments spy on political opponents by using cell data to track their location and intercepting encrypted communications and social media, a Wall Street Journal investigation found.
The report, which did not find evidence that Huawei executives in China were aware of or approved the activities in Africa, could still add ammunition to the U.S. government’s allegations that Huawei could be used for espionage on behalf of the Chinese government. Huawei has denied these claims, but the U.S. has remained wary of the smartphone maker, with the Department of Justice filing criminal charges in two separate cases in January, alleging its CFO committed wire fraud and violated U.S. sanctions on Iran and that the company stole trade secrets from T-Mobile.

The WSJ investigation did not find evidence of spying activity by or on behalf of the Chinese government in Africa. It also did not find any unique features in Huawei’s technology that allowed spying activity to occur.

In two separate cases in Uganda and Zambia, the Journal found that Huawei employees used its technology to aid domestic spying on behalf of governments in those countries. Huawei technicians working in Uganda’s police headquarters office used Pegasus spyware made by Israei company NSO Group to crack into the encrypted messages of a rapper-turned-activist named Bobi Wine, the Journal investigation initially reported. (The WSJ later corrected its article to reflect that the software was “Pegasus-style spyware” created by unknown other parties, not actually the Pegasus software from NSO.). A cyber team based at the Ugandan police headquarters asked the Huawei technicians for help after failing to access the encrypted messages using the spyware, security officials told the Journal.
Hmm ... , sounds like the Huawei employees where earning a little on the side ...
 

Swa

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What's the consistent rule here? Are companies not supposed to give access if requested by the local government? If Cisco installs networking equipment in the UK, would they resist a demand by the UK government to enable monitoring of certain traffic?

I could understand the outrage if it was the case of Huawei spying on Africans for the benefit of the Chinese government, but this is a government spying on its own citizens. That the kind of stuff the Five Eyes loves.
More accurately it would be the operator and not the vendor doing the spying. The vendor simply enables the functions for the operator to do so. In the case of Huawei though their employees also regularly work for the operator so they'd be compelled to execute the orders if requested to do so. Of course saying "network operators helped African politicians to spy on enemies" doesn't sell so well as "Huawei helped African politicians to spy on enemies".

I told you so.

Huawei/China is bad news.
Hope you're not on Cell C, MTN, Rain, Telkom or Vodacom then because there's no difference.
 
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