Huge demand for Supersonic Air Fibre

Joseph matane

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Joined
Feb 7, 2017
Messages
679
It's not being clever but correct. If I don't have the fibre line coming into my house I don't have fibre or else every wisp or wireless service provider can call their product fibre as well. Saying air fibre is like saying dry water.

With that said I am highly tempted by this. It's a toss up between Rain and Supersonic. Only problem is with Rain I still need another connection so it will cost R333. This is R399 but I'd prefer to have some backup as well so unless that's payg I'd have to pay R482.

I will sign up with this just to provide some competition to Vumatel.
Dry water
 

Danie_V

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Apr 15, 2010
Messages
280
Well yes I also thought air fibre was like the overhead fibre that OpenServe often puts in vs trenched fibre. That looks very much more like an LTE type service and speeds. My LTE base station was clocking about 80Mbps. It's good to fill in apps where fibre does not exist, but I seriously think it should be called what it is: "whatever" wireless Internet just be refer to 5GHz WiFi or 2.4GHz WiFi. Wondering if unlicensed spectrum will experience interference and affect that speed.
 

Apogee

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Aug 16, 2016
Messages
894
Well yes I also thought air fibre was like the overhead fibre that OpenServe often puts in vs trenched fibre. That looks very much more like an LTE type service and speeds. My LTE base station was clocking about 80Mbps. It's good to fill in apps where fibre does not exist, but I seriously think it should be called what it is: "whatever" wireless Internet just be refer to 5GHz WiFi or 2.4GHz WiFi. Wondering if unlicensed spectrum will experience interference and affect that speed.
Here is more info on the specifics of the product:


As I understand it, they have formed a partnership with the company to launch it in SA.
 
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Hummercellc

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Jan 6, 2008
Messages
3,440
In my opinion, WISPs don't have the necessary funding to afford licensed spectrum.

Therefore ICASA should not allow the likes of MTN, Vodacom, Telkom, rain or any other individual class license holder who has access to licensed spectrum the right to use any ISM bands.

I can forsee this completely distorying the WISP industry who will experience tons of interference and be unable to compete.

The idea is great don't get me wrong, however it will be interesting to see how many of the large WISPs take MTN to court over this.

There is currently no focus or will from ICASA to protect the little guys.

Most will vanish once MTN gets a strong hold, whereby forcing the little guy to close down and leave customers in remote rural areas without connectivity, as MTN won't worry about those who will never see coverage from this, begin labeled as 'not feasible to deploy' in the area.

Am I wrong?
Many WISPs offer great service and focus only on their small towns, which are generally under serviced, getting those who generally have zero access to internet or cell service connected.

ICASA need to open a chunk of spectrum on the same principle as ISM bands, with limitations, such as, the spectrum may only be used by class license holders and for outdoor use only.
Therefore giving the little guy a chance to survive.
 

Sapphiron

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Joined
Jan 29, 2004
Messages
2,691
So
In my opinion, WISPs don't have the necessary funding to afford licensed spectrum.

Therefore ICASA should not allow the likes of MTN, Vodacom, Telkom, rain or any other individual class license holder who has access to licensed spectrum the right to use any ISM bands.

I can forsee this completely distorying the WISP industry who will experience tons of interference and be unable to compete.

The idea is great don't get me wrong, however it will be interesting to see how many of the large WISPs take MTN to court over this.

There is currently no focus or will from ICASA to protect the little guys.

Most will vanish once MTN gets a strong hold, whereby forcing the little guy to close down and leave customers in remote rural areas without connectivity, as MTN won't worry about those who will never see coverage from this, begin labeled as 'not feasible to deploy' in the area.

Am I wrong?
Many WISPs offer great service and focus only on their small towns, which are generally under serviced, getting those who generally have zero access to internet or cell service connected.

ICASA need to open a chunk of spectrum on the same principle as ISM bands, with limitations, such as, the spectrum may only be used by class license holders and for outdoor use only.
Therefore giving the little guy a chance to survive.
Agree fully

Maybe open up 5.8GHz, 7GHz, 11GHz and 24Ghz and 60GHz to "small operator licences" that are open to use for anyone not purchasing licenced spectrum and holding an ENCS licence.
 

Romito

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Mar 18, 2010
Messages
1,692
They better haul @$$ before Starlink launches, they won't compete in their current deployment model whereas Starlink will be bought outright and deployed with no interest quota to be met.
 

Johand

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Jan 21, 2005
Messages
1,729
Maybe Coca Cola should start calling Coke Zero a health drink. If it isn't fibre then fibre should not be in the name. They cannot make the same promises around latency etc because you can't effectively isolate users on RF.

Maybe we can call water "clear milk". Or bubble gum "toothpaste crystals". Or toilets "water dispensers".

There is no valid reason for in putting the word fibre in the name except to mislead people.
 

haroldj

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Joined
Mar 22, 2010
Messages
199
Seeing is believing, I hear that there is fibre around as well as 5G, I am only hearing these things, when I see it, then I will believe that it is true.
 
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