Huge jump in South Africans looking to emigrate – and load shedding isn’t helping

KT-B

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#4
People leave - and yes people will leave because of loadshedding. People tend to see the worst possible outcome. Look at all those that fled before Nelson Mandela was released. All the horror stories going around about the bloodshed that was coming. There is good and bad in every country. And you either love this country enough to stay and try and do your bit to make it better, while hoping things will improve. Or you cut your losses and run.

Luckily we have the freedom to stay or go. It could have been worse - we may all have been told to get out. But there are enough people, on all sides, that want South African to be the amazing country it can be. And are willing to work together to see that it becomes that. We just have to get on the same page when it comes to certain issues - and with crises like these - I think we will get there.

Yes - I am an optimist. But I look at the people and I see that there are enough of us to make it work.
 

whatwhat

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#6
People leave - and yes people will leave because of loadshedding. People tend to see the worst possible outcome. Look at all those that fled before Nelson Mandela was released. All the horror stories going around about the bloodshed that was coming. There is good and bad in every country. And you either love this country enough to stay and try and do your bit to make it better, while hoping things will improve. Or you cut your losses and run.

Luckily we have the freedom to stay or go. It could have been worse - we may all have been told to get out. But there are enough people, on all sides, that want South African to be the amazing country it can be. And are willing to work together to see that it becomes that. We just have to get on the same page when it comes to certain issues - and with crises like these - I think we will get there.

Yes - I am an optimist. But I look at the people and I see that there are enough of us to make it work.
That's very noble. But honestly life is too short to wait for this **** to get sorted out.
 

Masataka

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857
#7
Yes - I am an optimist. But I look at the people and I see that there are enough of us to make it work.
None of those people are in government or any significant seat of power, so it’ll continue to be a brick wall.
 

KT-B

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#8
That's very noble. But honestly life is too short to wait for this **** to get sorted out.
I disagree - somethings are worth it. I suppose you are young and have your whole life ahead of you. Then go out and live it. For some strange reason I feel a deep tie to this country and the people and different cultures. I think it is a really amazing place.

And as for loadshedding. There are thousands - if not more - people in our country that have never had access to electricity or water in taps. And yet they survive. They make it. These are mere inconveniences we have to go through now. Soon we will forget the hours and only remember how annoyed we were. :ROFL:

But you must do what you feel you need.
 

KT-B

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#9
None of those people are in government or any significant seat of power, so it’ll continue to be a brick wall.
Those people will eventually be replaced. Yes that is long term but I have the feeling we are headed for a shakeup very soon. I think even they realise that things cannot continue.

Remember - the almighty Dollar (meaning money) rules everything. This is taking that dollar further away. I do see this as a temporary problem in the scheme of things.
 

Hellhound105

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#11
People leave - and yes people will leave because of loadshedding. People tend to see the worst possible outcome. Look at all those that fled before Nelson Mandela was released. All the horror stories going around about the bloodshed that was coming. There is good and bad in every country. And you either love this country enough to stay and try and do your bit to make it better, while hoping things will improve. Or you cut your losses and run.

Luckily we have the freedom to stay or go. It could have been worse - we may all have been told to get out. But there are enough people, on all sides, that want South African to be the amazing country it can be. And are willing to work together to see that it becomes that. We just have to get on the same page when it comes to certain issues - and with crises like these - I think we will get there.

Yes - I am an optimist. But I look at the people and I see that there are enough of us to make it work.

Luckily for them the ones that fled were proven correct. Just not in they way they thought. Not only are white people murdered on their farms but everyone is being murdered equally. So yes blood shedding did come.
 

KT-B

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#12
Luckily for them the ones that fled were proven correct. Just not in they way they thought. Not only are white people murdered on their farms but everyone is being murdered equally. So yes blood shedding did come.
Oh come now - definitely not to the extent of the stories that were spread. We were all going to be massacred. While farm murders are absolutely horrendous, as is all violence in this country, we are not all being slaughtered. I can walk alone down the street and nothing bad happens. Yes we do have very bad, very violent criminals here - and they need to be taken care of (I am a fan of the death penalty) - but when it comes to numbers - they are not in the majority.

But violence isn't new to this country. Do yourself a favour and go and view the footage archives at the Robben Island museum in CT. We had the "privilege" of converting a lot of it. The violence that was going on in jails, police stations and townships, while I was sleeping soundly in my bed - is horrific. We - as South Africans - have to realise that we created the violence. No race holds ownership. We are all part of the problem. We all need to be part of the solution. Ah yugh - I sound like a useless politician. But it is an issue that needs addressing - and sadly - probably with violence.
 
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moklet

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Aug 20, 2005
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3,729
#13
People leave - and yes people will leave because of loadshedding. People tend to see the worst possible outcome. Look at all those that fled before Nelson Mandela was released. All the horror stories going around about the bloodshed that was coming. There is good and bad in every country. And you either love this country enough to stay and try and do your bit to make it better, while hoping things will improve. Or you cut your losses and run.

Luckily we have the freedom to stay or go. It could have been worse - we may all have been told to get out. But there are enough people, on all sides, that want South African to be the amazing country it can be. And are willing to work together to see that it becomes that. We just have to get on the same page when it comes to certain issues - and with crises like these - I think we will get there.

Yes - I am an optimist. But I look at the people and I see that there are enough of us to make it work.
:thumbsup: I can leave anytime (Have dual nationality as does my daughter, except my wife, It shouldn't be to difficult to get her into Europe) But SA is still my country of birth I have lived here for 70% of my life not something I am just willing to leave behind. So I am staying and sticking it out
 

evilstebunny

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Dec 20, 2007
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18,786
#14
People leave - and yes people will leave because of loadshedding. People tend to see the worst possible outcome. Look at all those that fled before Nelson Mandela was released. All the horror stories going around about the bloodshed that was coming. There is good and bad in every country. And you either love this country enough to stay and try and do your bit to make it better, while hoping things will improve. Or you cut your losses and run.

Luckily we have the freedom to stay or go. It could have been worse - we may all have been told to get out. But there are enough people, on all sides, that want South African to be the amazing country it can be. And are willing to work together to see that it becomes that. We just have to get on the same page when it comes to certain issues - and with crises like these - I think we will get there.

Yes - I am an optimist. But I look at the people and I see that there are enough of us to make it work.
Nice to see some are still positive, tho I like to call it delusional..

Mandela & them promised not to mess with property rights, that's why people stayed all these years but are leaving now.

I also doubt your assumption on enough people want to make it work, else why would they vote for Zuma, twice. If you said voted for what they could score then at least you'd have been honest.

But yeah it takes a special kind to look at 40-50% capacity loss and say you know what I think we're going to be OK. BTW Jhb has water shortages now.

It's like value signaling, maybe call it attitude signalling.
 

KT-B

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Feb 3, 2014
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22,354
#15
Nice to see some are still positive, tho I like to call it delusional..

Mandela & them promised not to mess with property rights, that's why people stayed all these years but are leaving now.

I also doubt your assumption on enough people want to make it work, else why would they vote for Zuma, twice. If you said voted for what they could score then at least you'd have been honest.

But yeah it takes a special kind to look at 40-50% capacity loss and say you know what I think we're going to be OK. BTW Jhb has water shortages now.

It's like value signaling, maybe call it attitude signalling.
Look there is no denying that things are bad. I will definitely give you that. And as for people voting - well I do not understand their mindset. But from talking to some people, often it is a historical thing. A feeling of being indebted to the party that freed them. But that is changing. You also have to remember that a lot of the people in this country are being manipulated and only seeing part of the picture. They do not have access to all the information that is freely available to those with money, jobs and living in built up areas.

Throughout history there are examples of people being manipulated, brainwashed, mislead. This is not unique here. We have politicians who know their people very well. They know what will stir their pride, what will make them feel included. And from a poor person's perspective - our politicians are idolized. They were terrorists - thrown out of the country - banned. Now they are the ones in power, driving big beautiful cars and living in huge houses on estates. This has been promised to the poor too. Wait your turn - you will be like us. We are preparing the way for you to rise. It will take time - but you too will be rich. Wealth is no longer cattle - it is a big house and fancy cars. They are not warned about all that goes with that big car and house. The costs, the repair and maintenance. Paying bills, accounts, taxes. None of that is ever mentioned to them. There is a reason for the non-payment of utilities in places like Soweto. And it is not the people's fault - but the politicians.

You say that the people should know better. I grew up in a mining town. The mindset was much the same. Status and wealth lay in objects. Often you would see them driving BMWs and Mercs but their kids did not have shoes or food during the day. They refused to pay the measly school fees but went to the Rec club every week. Often rent would go unpaid and they would have to pawn items to make the rent and stop the sheriff from evicting them. But they still had their fancy cars. I remember the speeches the AWB and CP used to give in town. I was about 10 at the time. How the people cheered. But only the poor people really. They were told that they were poor because other people were taking their jobs. That all the immigrants were coming in and trying to take what little they had away from them. They would protect them. They would ensure that they remained a force to be reckoned with. Separation of the people was the only way to ensure that their standard of living would go back to what it was.

Politicians know their people and will tell them what they want to hear. It takes people a while to realise they are being had.
 

Kosmik

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Joined
Sep 21, 2007
Messages
18,594
#16
TBH, I have no intention of emigrating BUT I also have the benefit of being able to walk on to a plane tomorrow with my family and moving into a house with car in 24hrs in Europe. If I didn't have that option, I would seriously be looking around.
 

Zoomzoom

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2014
Messages
3,771
#18
People leave - and yes people will leave because of loadshedding. People tend to see the worst possible outcome. Look at all those that fled before Nelson Mandela was released. All the horror stories going around about the bloodshed that was coming. There is good and bad in every country. And you either love this country enough to stay and try and do your bit to make it better, while hoping things will improve. Or you cut your losses and run.

Luckily we have the freedom to stay or go. It could have been worse - we may all have been told to get out. But there are enough people, on all sides, that want South African to be the amazing country it can be. And are willing to work together to see that it becomes that. We just have to get on the same page when it comes to certain issues - and with crises like these - I think we will get there.

Yes - I am an optimist. But I look at the people and I see that there are enough of us to make it work.
I mostly agree with you, but one of the things that we need to actively resist is the divisive political rhetoric. There are lots of people that just want to get on with their lives, but there are a number who are angry, and are being told who to be angry at (instead of the corrupt politicians who are really responsible for the mess), and that is worrying.
 

eg2505

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Mar 12, 2008
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#20
:thumbsup: I can leave anytime (Have dual nationality as does my daughter, except my wife, It shouldn't be to difficult to get her into Europe) But SA is still my country of birth I have lived here for 70% of my life not something I am just willing to leave behind. So I am staying and sticking it out
same here, lucky enough to have my dual citizenship, and yes lived 70% in SA.
so going to stick it out. and hope for the best, but prepare for the worst.
 
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