Humanities students could lose out on government funding

Suspect99

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#21
Folks who rubbish humanities subjects should see how well they themselves do in such subjects before they judge. As Hennie pointed out, a music degree with say piano as an instrument is a very challenging degree, more so than many STEM degrees. Try becoming proficient at sight-reading keyboard music if you think it's so easy. Better yet, have a look at a Grade 6 music theory book (done by children) and then say it's easy.
You should be able to study your "difficult" arts degree. You just shouldn't expect the rest of the country to contribute to funding it.
 

ponder

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#23
Folks who rubbish humanities subjects should see how well they themselves do in such subjects before they judge. As Hennie pointed out, a music degree with say piano as an instrument is a very challenging degree, more so than many STEM degrees. Try becoming proficient at sight-reading keyboard music if you think it's so easy. Better yet, have a look at a Grade 6 music theory book (done by children) and then say it's easy.
I don't have an issue with humanities per se, my issue is we have way to many people enrolled in that department. I speak under correction but I think there are more humanities students than science students.
 

Emjay

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#24
Well, well, decolonisation of Western Education at work, after all Fine Art, Music, Drama, History, Philosophy and Law amongst others are not what make up local culture.
Better to produce happy little workers.
But then again I suppose its for the best, as culture is lost on almost all South Africans anyway.
Fine Art, Music, Drama
These fields do not require degrees, and should be defunded.
 

Emjay

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#25
toss

Bull ****


I started working on my music degree when I was 10, talking out of your ass. I worked harder on my degree than at any other part of my career. You have no idea how music students have to bust there ass to graduate.

The problem with all of these Universities don't provide a job, they provide education. An education is much more than just a job, it polishes you as a human being. Who is to say what kind of polish you are interested in is of more worth than another person's.

I mention it again I used my humanities degree to help primary school children gain access to some of the most exclusive public schools in Gauteng. I have indeed used my education to change lives positively, so this derisive attitude towards art degrees is absolute baloney I would like to hear how much of a personal influence you IT graduates have had in the personal lives of children?
While I agree that they are culturally relevant, tax payers should not be paying for these degrees.

It's a pity that whatever you studied left you functionally illiterate.
I am in STEM. But, I studied law and business. Guess which I never use? The things from my business studies. My real world experience is far more valuable and has taught me more than those questionable business studies.
 

Knyro

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#26
These fields do not require degrees, and should be defunded.
Quite a few STEM fields don't require degrees either.

By that logic only professional degrees like engineering and medicine should be funded.
 

Emjay

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#27
Quite a few STEM fields don't require degrees either.

By that logic only professional degrees like engineering and medicine should be funded.
Such as?

I am not disagreeing btw. I think that the requirement for everyone to have a degree is a load of absolute BS.
 

Knyro

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#28
Such as?

I am not disagreeing btw. I think that the requirement for everyone to have a degree is a load of absolute BS.
Pure sciences like physics, chemistry etc. maths, as well as CS.

Strickly speaking you don't even need a PhD to be a researcher and publish in these fields, though almost all of them do.
 

Emjay

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#29
Pure sciences like physics, chemistry etc. maths, as well as CS.

Strickly speaking you don't even need a PhD to be a researcher and publish in these fields, though almost all of them do.
Someone getting in front of camera does not need as much training as someone who is a chemical engineer.
 

Nicodeamus

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#31
I don't see the point in telling kids that they have a bright future ahead of them if they study something that cannot get them an income.

I am also interested in the humanities and have in my private team read a significant amount of history, social sciences, politics and philosophy, but they are not going to make me a better Engineer. They have however made me more articulate and probably more cultural.
 

Polymathic

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#33
toss

Bull ****


I started working on my music degree when I was 10, talking out of your ass. I worked harder on my degree than at any other part of my career. You have no idea how music students have to bust there ass to graduate.

The problem with all of these Universities don't provide a job, they provide education. An education is much more than just a job, it polishes you as a human being. Who is to say what kind of polish you are interested in is of more worth than another person's.

I mention it again I used my humanities degree to help primary school children gain access to some of the most exclusive public schools in Gauteng. I have indeed used my education to change lives positively, so this derisive attitude towards art degrees is absolute baloney I would like to hear how much of a personal influence you IT graduates have had in the personal lives of children?
Why would you need a formal education do to what you doing ?
 

Sollie

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#34
The way I see it. Certain skills are needed as foundation skills for any country. Those would be things like engineering, chemistry, doctors etc. One you have the foundation in place, you can apply things like commerce orientated skills. On top of that you have your humanities.

All three are needed or a healthy country. But we are not a healthy country. We have an overflow of middlemen in business (tenderpreneurs even), covered by an overflow of social sciences (the Malema effect?). However at the bottom, the foundation level, we are stuffed. We are not producing.
 

NarrowBandFtw

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#35
I worked harder on my degree than at any other part of my career. You have no idea how music students have to bust there ass to graduate.
Folks who rubbish humanities subjects should see how well they themselves do in such subjects before they judge
You're both confusing effort / difficulty with value, the simple fact is STEM grads are in higher demand in South Africa (and most other countries for that matter) than almost any music grad. There are more STEM jobs and generally they pay more, because the free market attaches a higher financial value to them, plain and simple. How many music grads actually become financially successful in their field? A fair number of STEM grads do, that is the point.

Who is to say what kind of polish you are interested in is of more worth than another person's
National salary surveys, that's who.

I would like to hear how much of a personal influence you IT graduates have had in the personal lives of children?
Children who perhaps benefit from grants or loans administered by IT systems? Well an IT grad built it.
Children who go to a community IT course to get ahead in life? An IT grad teaches it.
Children who benefit from any number of government social programs? Your typical IT grad who's reasonably successful is paying over 40% in PAYE to make that possible, way more than your typical music grad is contributing.

Remember this is a broad strokes, generalized approach to a solution for the masses. Of course we're not all alike and of course we need the arts. What a country like South Africa most desperately needs though is STEM.
 

Techne

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#36
toss

Bull ****


I started working on my music degree when I was 10, talking out of your ass. I worked harder on my degree than at any other part of my career. You have no idea how music students have to bust there ass to graduate.

The problem with all of these Universities don't provide a job, they provide education. An education is much more than just a job, it polishes you as a human being. Who is to say what kind of polish you are interested in is of more worth than another person's.

I mention it again I used my humanities degree to help primary school children gain access to some of the most exclusive public schools in Gauteng. I have indeed used my education to change lives positively, so this derisive attitude towards art degrees is absolute baloney I would like to hear how much of a personal influence you IT graduates have had in the personal lives of children?
Wtf is music doing under the humanites faculty. Move it to education and let the gender studies, social justice and marxist and Bolshevik philophers rot without funding.
 

pinball wizard

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#38
Wtf is music doing under the humanites faculty. Move it to education and let the gender studies, social justice and marxist and Bolshevik philophers rot without funding.
What's that quote about a country that doesn't learn it's own history being doomed to repeat it. Something like that rings a bell. But yeah, sure, lets just flush everything not seen as a hard skill down the toilet. Actually the term hard and soft skills should also be flushed.
 

Brenden_E

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#39
Folks who rubbish humanities subjects should see how well they themselves do in such subjects before they judge. As Hennie pointed out, a music degree with say piano as an instrument is a very challenging degree, more so than many STEM degrees. Try becoming proficient at sight-reading keyboard music if you think it's so easy. Better yet, have a look at a Grade 6 music theory book (done by children) and then say it's easy.
LoL!~:)
 

Swa

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#40
Folks who rubbish humanities subjects should see how well they themselves do in such subjects before they judge. As Hennie pointed out, a music degree with say piano as an instrument is a very challenging degree, more so than many STEM degrees. Try becoming proficient at sight-reading keyboard music if you think it's so easy. Better yet, have a look at a Grade 6 music theory book (done by children) and then say it's easy.
I have nothing against art and nobody is rubbishing it. But if you really think about it you don't need a degree if you have the talent and most of the big names never had one but landed there accidentally. It's too crowded in any case nowadays with most who can't make it elsewhere thinking they can do so in music and acting. If it needs to be funded then rather do it for those that have made it and have some talent. It's only two out of over a dozen navel gazing subjects.
 
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