I married myself and it was truly empowering

SAguy

Expert Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2013
Messages
2,189

KT-B

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 3, 2014
Messages
23,322

RedViking

Nord of the South
Joined
Feb 23, 2012
Messages
18,589
#25
I have a friend who has been single for MANY years but can not get over the fact that she hasn't found her husband yet. You don't HAVE to be married in order to have purpose or feel "complete". There is also the other side, some people celebrate their independence and "singleness" as if it is the best thing since sliced bread.
 

rambo919

Expert Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2008
Messages
3,048
#26
What I want to know, was it in or out of community of property? If she develops a split personality are both taxed separately?
 

As1974a

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 5, 2017
Messages
116
#31
So the only difference is she has a "rock" on her finger, which normal signals that you are married to someone else. This is what everyone else will see and assume.

Oh ya. There has to be some talking to herself at some point, with or without other personalities.
 

SAguy

Expert Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2013
Messages
2,189
#33
I have a friend who has been single for MANY years but can not get over the fact that she hasn't found her husband yet. You don't HAVE to be married in order to have purpose or feel "complete". There is also the other side, some people celebrate their independence and "singleness" as if it is the best thing since sliced bread.
And then.. like this lady... feel the need to tell the whole world about it at every opportunity.

Me: Hi ma'am let me hold the door for you
Woman: Excuse me, I'm single and independant, I don't need a man opening a door for me. Also, I'm vegan, do cross-fit and don't watch Game of Thrones.
Me: Tsek
 

SAguy

Expert Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2013
Messages
2,189
#37
Um thanks, but I think it's perfectly acceptable to be bored of something these days.
Which of these expressions should you use: is one of them less acceptable than the others?

Do you ever get bored with eating out all the time?

Delegates were bored by the lectures.

He grew bored of his day job.

The first two constructions, bored with and bored by, are the standard ones. The third, bored of, is more recent than the other two and it’s become extremely common. In fact, the Oxford English Corpus contains almost twice as many instances of bored of than bored by. It represents a perfectly logical development of the language, and was probably formed on the pattern of expressions such as tired of or weary of. Nevertheless, some people dislike it and it’s not fully accepted in standard English. It’s best to avoid using it in formal writing.
Apparently it's expected to use formal writing on mybb, who knew...pffft. :rolleyes:
 

Zoomzoom

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2014
Messages
4,055
#38
None. It's a personal preference.
No it's not. Bored of is a horrible incorrect usage that resulted from poor education in the US that has become sufficiently popularised, because bad education is sadly horrifically universal, that people think is correct because they see it so often. The correct phrase is bored with.
 

Nick333

Honorary Master
Joined
Nov 17, 2005
Messages
33,885
#39
Not in properly correct English it's not.
There's no such thing even when one ignores the reduancy of something being "properly correct". Being "bored of" something is logical which is the only real consideration when considering whether or not something constitutes correct or proper English.
 

Nick333

Honorary Master
Joined
Nov 17, 2005
Messages
33,885
#40
No it's not. Bored of is a horrible incorrect usage that resulted from poor education in the US that has become sufficiently popularised because bad education is sadly horrifically universal that people think is correct because they see it so often. The correct phrase is bored with.
No. It was simply not the common usage. It is now.
 
Top