Icasa will investigate WhatsApp and Facebook in South Africa

So, what will stop Telkom now to say that we have to pay extra for VOIP on ADSL lines???
 
Oh, Icasa is doing this.

We don't have anything to worry about then.

;D
 
Of course they are, because they see another potential income stream for themselves.
 
no, you should rather investigate the extremely high SMS prices and how and why they are still that expensive with todays technology.


then you will not need to create a commission or investigate or an enquiry or send a probe into "the internet" and applications that run over it.


you can then slam or condem the price fixing or collusion between the mobile operaters and their SMS cash cow prices.



but then this will never happen because here, it is most likely the man investigating gets a backhand to favour his decision towards the mobile operators.
 
Great another 10 year project with no deliverable at the end.
 
Well they may as well investigate candy crush, google app store and any other app in the play store that uses data!
 
ICASA and all MP's should read this article.


Vodacom, MTN want to break the Internet

Can you imagine Facebook opening offices in every city or appointing officials in small towns to do Rica just so South Africans can talk to each other online? By Nathan Jeffery.
Added by Nathan Jeffery on 27 January 2016.

As you might have seen, the networks are at it again, on a drive to get the government to regulate Web services, which these network operators like to call “over-the-top” (OTT) providers.
Regulating Internet services will have a huge ripple effect throughout the economy. I don’t even want to start thinking about how badly this could be implemented.

How on Earth would such regulation even be managed? Can you imagine Facebook opening offices in every city or appointing officials in small towns to do Rica just so South Africans can talk to each other online?

I can’t see this happening, though. It is counterintuitive and anti-Internet to add such labour-intensive processes. If Vodacom and MTN have their way and companies such as Facebook and Google are somehow forced to add complex and unnecessary red tape to the sign up and account-creation process, all that will happen is they will pull out of the country.

Fighting for regulation instead of innovation


While organisations like Digital Village, Project Isizwe and the Western Cape government are making an effort to get more people online and bring communication costs down, companies like Vodacom and MTN are publicly making an effort here to screw the South African consumer.

These big companies are pleading poverty while the CEO of Vodacom was paid R10,9m in 2015 and the CEO of MTN R28,1m in 2014. Who are they trying to fool?

They sell bandwidth to consumers and then, if you don’t use it within a certain amount of time, you lose it. Imagine buying a hamburger, but because you don’t eat it fast enough, the restaurant throws it away. There is no way we would accept that from anyone in retail, so why on Earth is it acceptable from a cellular service provider?

Meanwhile, forward-thinking network operator Cell C is embracing OTT players and says regulation could hurt the industry. That’s stating the obvious.

I’ve been a Vodacom customer for going on 18 years now and I’ve generally been happy with the service, even if I haven’t been happy with the pricing. I have, however, reached the point where I feel we need to start threatening to cancel our contracts and moving to operators like Cell C that have embraced the future.

Networks like MTN and Vodacom need to realise that they are nothing more than utilities. The only value they have to offer us in the long term is faster connectivity and wider network coverage. There is, however, nothing stopping them from investing in Internet start-ups or creating their own OTT services.

Why not rather be productive and contribute to society by incentivising innovation or establishing and running accelerators or incubators? They could even create investment vehicles to push our economy forward, in new directions, leveraging their core network and embracing new technologies instead of spending time, effort and money on slowing down progress with legal or regulatory proceedings and attacking companies offering services that benefit the community and economy.

Let’s debunk some myths

Service providers make some blanket claims that indicate they don’t understand how the Internet or hosting business works. Worse, it seems that the CEOs of these companies that make the claims don’t understand how the billing systems work at their own companies.

Part of what is so infuriating about this whole situation and some of the accusations being thrown around is that both Vodacom and MTN are also commercial Internet service providers, operating data centres, home to what they themselves refer to as OTTs. As a result of hosting and bandwidth utilisation being a source of revenue for network operators, they should know that anyone operating a cloud service (an OTT service) pays for hosting and bandwidth utilisation.
 
First world companies will realize soon they aren't needed in third world countries.
 
ICASA please investigate Cell Networks for:

*Expiry of data against the spirit of CPA
>ICASA - please make networks comply with CPA, data expiry is anti-consumer anti CPA.

*Open ended data contracts with OOB resulting in R20,000 bills for unsuspecting consumers - violation of Credit act.
>ICASA - please force networks to implement a R1,000 limit to protect consumers.

*Roaming charges of R351,000/GB in violation of Credit Act
>ICASA - please force networks to implement a R1,000 limit to protect consumers.
 
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If Vodacom and MTN have their way and companies such as Facebook and Google are somehow forced to add complex and unnecessary red tape to the sign up and account-creation process, all that will happen is they will pull out of the country.

As stated numerous times; there is no intent to block, manage or charge for WhatsApp.

Ah yes, the Oscar defense. "I was just shooting at a bathroom door. I had no idea of the "unintended" consequences of my actions."

Do you think we're stupid, jannie?
 
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