Inside the ultra-modern R6-million Cape Town shipping container home

Kornhole

Blackburn Fan
Joined
Oct 15, 2008
Messages
32,544
The container itself isn't all that expensive... The shipping and craning to get it onto site is going to be po3s expensive, and then of course the cost of modifying and fitout.
I think it cost them a third of the price instead of building a new house. Also about 3/4 months to build.
 

ToxicBunny

Oi! Leave me out of this...
Joined
Apr 8, 2006
Messages
97,947
I think it cost them a third of the price instead of building a new house. Also about 3/4 months to build.

Yeah on easily accessible sites, and where the finish/fitout isn't crazy then I do personally think container homes could be a fair chunk cheaper and quicker to build..

This site definitely had some significant access challenges and all that, but those challenges would have existed regardless. It would actually be very interesting to see a breakdown of that R6m in terms of structural costs vs finish/fit out costs. I would hazard a guess that the vast majority was to finist/fit out rather than the containers and getting them positioned on site.
 

Kornhole

Blackburn Fan
Joined
Oct 15, 2008
Messages
32,544
Yeah on easily accessible sites, and where the finish/fitout isn't crazy then I do personally think container homes could be a fair chunk cheaper and quicker to build..

This site definitely had some significant access challenges and all that, but those challenges would have existed regardless. It would actually be very interesting to see a breakdown of that R6m in terms of structural costs vs finish/fit out costs. I would hazard a guess that the vast majority was to finist/fit out rather than the containers and getting them positioned on site.
Oh wait lol I meant my parents one :laugh:
 

RaptorSA

Expert Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2008
Messages
4,915
Containers are not the cheap and effective solution to buildings..insulation and structural support issues mean you have to solve that with other materials.

From what I’ve read, it’s cool for facades but even there.. you get the same effect with cheaper materials as cladding.

This.
Awkward sizes that need a ton of design to make work... structural integrity that goes to hell once you start cutting it, tons of material needed to insulate and provide channelling etc.

I used to take the container thing seriously but after some research, it's a really k@k idea in most cases.
They're also really expensive and getting these things delivered where you need them is inefficient and everything but cheap.

Building container homes are like people who sell their perfectly working older gas car to buy a new Tesla.
You think you're doing the environment a favor but the numbers don't add up.
 

Zyzzyva

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2007
Messages
7,348
Bricks are cheap. It's all the other stuff that costs money. Don't see the point of using a product that will rust and degrade, with the added constraint of you having to conform the building to the shape of the containers.

Sound like a good idea, but once you put some thought into it it's rather dumb.

100 000 bricks costs about R230 000. Small money compared to the rest of the build.
 

ToxicBunny

Oi! Leave me out of this...
Joined
Apr 8, 2006
Messages
97,947
Just on the rust aspect with containers, many of the containers are built with some form of weathering steel so they will develop a surface level of rust if the protective coatings are damaged but the nature of the steel itself should slow further rusting quite significantly.

That and when they're modified into a home, they should be recoated with protective coatings which will even further slow the development of rust. I would generally expect a reasonably built container home to last 40 - 50 years before the rust was even a serious concern.
 

Zyzzyva

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2007
Messages
7,348
Just on the rust aspect with containers, many of the containers are built with some form of weathering steel so they will develop a surface level of rust if the protective coatings are damaged but the nature of the steel itself should slow further rusting quite significantly.

That and when they're modified into a home, they should be recoated with protective coatings which will even further slow the development of rust. I would generally expect a reasonably built container home to last 40 - 50 years before the rust was even a serious concern.
Yeah it's similar to wooden homes that can last quite long if maintained. But i still believe it makes sense to build to last. My current brick home is nearly 80 years old and is as good as new. You can't say that about the average American or Japanese home.

There are superior materials, use them.
 

Scampup

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2013
Messages
106

ToxicBunny

Oi! Leave me out of this...
Joined
Apr 8, 2006
Messages
97,947
Yeah it's similar to wooden homes that can last quite long if maintained. But i still believe it makes sense to build to last. My current brick home is nearly 80 years old and is as good as new. You can't say that about the average American or Japanese home.

There are superior materials, use them.

Bricks are not necessarily superior at all. Each material has its pro's and con's really and should be used in the right place/environment. I would not want to be in an SA home during a proper earthquake for example, I'd much rather be in a timber home.

We use them in this country largely because lumber is expensive here, and also if anything our building codes are seriously backwards and outdated. Try build anything, in a residential sense, that pushes the boundaries of building technology and see just how much uphill you get.
 

Sapphiron

Expert Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2004
Messages
2,627
Bricks are cheap. It's all the other stuff that costs money. Don't see the point of using a product that will rust and degrade, with the added constraint of you having to conform the building to the shape of the containers.

Sound like a good idea, but once you put some thought into it it's rather dumb.

100 000 bricks costs about R230 000. Small money compared to the rest of the build.
Exactly, if you want housing to be cheaper, you need pre-fab modules with pre-installed utilities and universal connectors
 

rietrot

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 26, 2016
Messages
25,800
Shipping containers are a terrible thing to make human habitation out of. They are designed to ship cargo over the ocean. Not be a comfortable place to live.
Prefab homes are a way better option as they are designed from scratch to be habitable. Specifically, the walls are made from a sandwich of aluminium and foam.

If you actually cared about the environment, then you would build your house from locally available materials, like compressed earth-stabilised bricks.

Well if you look at the photos this isn't really a container home. The containers were completely taken apart and only used for the outside walls.

It's just a gimmick. Not meant to be more practical or affordable.

Instead of cutting up old containers why not just order new steel/sheet metal if you want to do this. Then you don't have to spoeg en plak to get the pieces to fit. That's how large structures like warehouses are built.
 
Last edited:

AlphaJohn

Executive Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2012
Messages
9,912
Pretty sure 4 Million 3 Million, went to Winter heating and Summer cooling Esp cause its metal painted black,

Probably only cost about 1.2 Million to build and style. Rest was used for location.

Edit: forgot the million needed in bribes to get it past regulations.
 
Top