Integrated heat pump geysers that yield a high return on investment

Daniel Puchert

Journalist
Staff member
Joined
Mar 6, 2024
Messages
704
Power-saving geyser with big financial benefits

South Africans looking to reduce their electricity consumption on water heating can buy a geyser with an Integrated Heat Pump (IHP) and start seeing a return on their investment in a year and a half.

Conventional electric water heaters — known as geysers in South Africa — are notoriously energy-intensive appliances, accounting for 40% to 60% of a household's consumption.
 
Interesting as f***. So it cools the air around it to warm the water inside. So it will perform better on hotter days and in hotter climates.

"Return on investment period" is actually "break even time".

While the 16000/848=19months checks out, our household rarely spends more than R500/month in electricity, so clearly we won't break even in 19 months with the cash option.

Are the rooftop solar geysers still practical ? (I hate their looks). Or have they been made redundant by PV panels ?
 
Last edited:
A question for the solar boffins: How much does a PV system cost that produces 8.7 kWh per day in winter ? Just panels, inverter and installation.

Cheaper than R16,600 ? Then it makes more sense to go PV. Especially when before you installed a PV system and can just upsize your planned system.

(Again, that 8.7 kWh just for warm water is a bit high)
 
A question for the solar boffins: How much does a PV system cost that produces 8.7 kWh per day in winter ? Just panels, inverter and installation.

Cheaper than R16,600 ? Then it makes more sense to go PV. Especially when before you installed a PV system and can just upsize your planned system.

(Again, that 8.7 kWh just for warm water is a bit high)
If you have the inverter, might as well just add a battery for that price +solar panel or 2
 
A question for the solar boffins: How much does a PV system cost that produces 8.7 kWh per day in winter ? Just panels, inverter and installation.

Cheaper than R16,600 ? Then it makes more sense to go PV. Especially when before you installed a PV system and can just upsize your planned system.

(Again, that 8.7 kWh just for warm water is a bit high)
Definitely not less than R16k.

you probably need to bump your inverter up from 5 to 8KW , or 8 to 10KW. That's about R15k alone. Plus then you need the solar panels as well, a lot of them for winter. That's assuming you only run your geyser when the sun shines.
 
That's assuming you only run your geyser when the sun shines.
I'm willing to sacrifice my showers on cloudy winter days if it will reduce reliance on Eskom.

But I don't want to install this expensive geyser and then not use it because the grid is under severe pressure and I feel a duty to play my part.
 
No indication of warranty in the article or their website?
 
Where do you guys buy your geysers for R7k? They're around R4.5k for a 150l which is about the size an average 4 person household uses.
 
Where do you guys buy your geysers for R7k? They're around R4.5k for a 150l which is about the size an average 4 person household uses.

Copper geysers are more expensive though.
 
A question for the solar boffins: How much does a PV system cost that produces 8.7 kWh per day in winter ? Just panels, inverter and installation.

Cheaper than R16,600 ? Then it makes more sense to go PV. Especially when before you installed a PV system and can just upsize your planned system.

(Again, that 8.7 kWh just for warm water is a bit high)
Solar panels only definitely cheaper but the battery and inverter way more.
But that will power more not just to heat water so logically overall it's cheaper.
 
How quick does it heat? I’ve held onto my 3.5kw element, and it heats pretty quick when things go pear shaped with a child (or wife) killing the geyser.
Can one get the best of both? Ie a heat pump, and the geyser element? And use them when it makes sense?
 
How quick does it heat? I’ve held onto my 3.5kw element, and it heats pretty quick when things go pear shaped with a child (or wife) killing the geyser.
Can one get the best of both? Ie a heat pump, and the geyser element? And use them when it makes sense?
It does have a conventional element as well for heating above 60C
 
I was thinking of getting a heat-pump based system but I am in a complex and we don't allow geysers to be installed outside the unit - it must be in the roof (to which I agree BTW).

The problem is these heat pumps don't really worked when installed in a small enclosed space.

But other than that it is pretty fantastic technology.
 
Back
Top