International COVID-19 Updates & Discussion 3

Paulsie

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Great news for Africa and poorer countries.

I'm also happy to get this vaccine when it's my turn.
The Phizer vaccine just feels like there are long term side effects that are still unknown.
The Pfizer vaccine is also not going to be reviewed in a hurry IMO. As per article I read some time ago, the mRna is very unstable and it is therefore protected in a lipid layer. That in turn however used to cause huge inflammation response. That is where BioNTech come in as they were able to overcome this with new technology.

Unfortunately what goes into this "lipid layer" is a proprietary information so not likely to be disclosed.
 
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noxibox

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Was just reading about some German studies on Covid. About 70% of people having Covid ( mildly at home more than hospitalized) develop some form of myocarditis, noticed in athletes too.
Although they found it in 60% of cases they stated that their findings don't apply to those under 18 or who are asymptomatic. So potentially the incidence is about the same as influenza. They also did not distinguish between mild and moderate cases. Moderate only means not requiring hospitalisation. Mild can mean almost no symptoms. But all this means is that the standard advice of not exercising too soon after being sick applies.

There's no reason to think athletes would be immune to myocarditis. Although they are perhaps more likely to return to intense exercise too soon and thus do permanent damage. But they'd be in danger of doing the same with other infections too.
 

MiW

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The Telegraph? I'd rather read The Crusader or Stormfront (at least they're honest about their racism), but I didn't make any comment other than that the Lancet has published a positive peer review.

Here is a direct link to the Lancet.

So the Oxford vaccine did very thorough check for asymptomatic cases and transmissions. Pfizer and Moderna on the other hand , didn't bother at all , they said 'we can not exclude that there might be asymptomatic case and that they might transmit..

I would really like to see the real data of all of them. As it is I have the feeling Oxford counts the asymptomatic as getting Covid, and Pfizer Moderna don't.
I can only sit and guess.
 

Gordon_R

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So the Oxford vaccine did very thorough check for asymptomatic cases and transmissions. Pfizer and Moderna on the other hand , didn't bother at all , they said 'we can not exclude that there might be asymptomatic case and that they might transmit..

I would really like to see the real data of all of them. As it is I have the feeling Oxford counts the asymptomatic as getting Covid, and Pfizer Moderna don't.
I can only sit and guess.
Each trial is slightly different, depending on the regulatory authority, safety and efficacy aims and targets, and whether the phases 1/2/3 are combined. This very long article gives a detailed overview:
On Nov. 19, researchers published the first findings from the Phase 2/3 trials in the United Kingdom.
 

MiW

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Moderna
On Nov. 16, Moderna announced the first preliminary data from the trial, followed by the complete data on Nov. 30. Out of 196 cases of Covid-19 among trial volunteers, 185 were in people who received the placebo. And of the 11 vaccinated volunteers who got Covid-19, none suffered from severe disease.
Pfizer
The data showed that the vaccine prevented mild and severe forms of Covid-19, the company said
Oxford
No COVID-19-related hospital admissions occurred in ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 recipients
Although efficacy was lower (58·9% [1·0 to 82·9]) against asymptomatic infection in the LD/SD cohort (and unfortunately only 3·8% [−72·4 to 46·3] in the SD/SD group)
All 3 didn't have severe cases. We can not conclude if Moderna and Oxford had mild ones. There is no info for asymptomatic in Pfizer and Moderna.
So I personally can not make informed choice on which one is more effective.
 

Paulsie

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Regulators have now warned anyone else with a history of “significant” allergic reactions to medicines, food or vaccines should not receive the jab.
That's half the world's population then
We know from the very extensive clinical trials that this wasn't a feature."
:ROFL:
 

MiW

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Paulsie

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See we can wait for stage 4 trial to see how safe it is.
I actually just hope all is OK with this vaccine as so many people have been waiting for it in anticipation for so long.
 

Cr4ig

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IMG_20201209_134033.jpg
Line of people, only a few with masks, most of those with masks have it under their noses. And my 7yo pointed this out. Then people wonder why it's still spreading.
 

garp

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Quite a significant blind spot of the trials...
Other blind spots - drug interactions, pregnancy, fertility, long term effects on immunopathology ??

If I was 80+ yrs with a 5% chance of fatality if infected I would take it, but < 35yrs with a 0.05% chance or less (or even < 60yrs) then probably not, better to wait it out and see what happens.
 
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