Internet on your TV from Vodacom and MTN

FuLL_MeT4L

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2004
Messages
1,230
I think this is a great idea. A pity about the data costs though. Cell C should follow suite with a bundle including something a little more attractive than a measly 100mb. :)
 

SaiyanZ

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2008
Messages
8,136
The majority of the country living off R2000 a month is going get even more poor if they get this and use Vodacom's 3G network. Lets see:

Food: R800
Transport: R400
Rent: R400?...
Vodacom/MTN internet bill: R400
Total: R2000

Plus if they go out of bundle for a few GB's (which will be common as the poor is generally less educated) then they're going to be working to pay off the cell companies for the next few lifetimes.
 

LazyLion

King of de Jungle
Joined
Mar 17, 2005
Messages
104,808
Imagine a young kid seeing something on TV that interests him. However, he gets limited info on that topic. It'd be great if all of a sudden he can use that same TV, with a device like this, find out almost all there is to know about that. Education through the internet really has the power to turn this country around in a very positive way, starting at the new generation, so hopefully this will be a success.

So he sees something that he can use in his assignment for school tomorrow using the internet device his parents bought him for school, and then he runs across the highway to Tannie Marie's place to download it and print it out on her colour printer so that he can glue it in his assignment? :D
 

TwoCents1000

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Joined
Sep 27, 2010
Messages
198
The majority of the country living off R2000 a month is going get even more poor if they get this and use Vodacom's 3G network. Lets see:

Food: R800
Transport: R400
Rent: R400?...
Vodacom/MTN internet bill: R400
Total: R2000

Plus if they go out of bundle for a few GB's (which will be common as the poor is generally less educated) then they're going to be working to pay off the cell companies for the next few lifetimes.

Why is it that the very education your parents managed to get you through, to allow you the ability to post on an on-line forum, did not teach you how to think?

How many households in your R2000/month income (if they're lucky) are on contract with unlimited credit lines so they can run up an OOB bill? - None.

How many of the people that will buy this will sit and watch YouTube for hours, if at all, when they most likely only have GPRS speeds? - Most of them.

Last night the president promised school books will be delivered on time and teachers will spend 7 hours in class, yet it's not happening. Teachers are often as uneducated as the kids they must teach and often do not care about giving them a decent education. And even if they do really care, they don't have access to technology.

In South Africa, we have 98% population coverage by both MTN and Vodacom. But the vast majority of those same people are not PC-literate. The most technologically advanced device in their homes is most likely a TV.

Yet, at the same time, we have the Internet with near-infinite content. Up to now distance-learning attempts have failed because content was lacking on those mediums.

So:

- Where do you find as much content as you can consume? - On the Internet. Wikipedia alone is good enough for most school kids.

- How do you bring all this content into a home in an interactive manner? - Via the mobile networks.

- What do you give the users, where the average levels of education might be extremely low, to interact with the content? - some black-box solution that can use the TV as a display and do not require PC skills or maintenance.

What government and the networks should do, as a next step, is put these devices on a dedicated and subsidised APN with some proxy on the back-end.

I will gladly fund the education of a few kids in a disadvantaged environment using a device like this.

Instead of ridiculing attempts to further education (which is the ONLY thing that will save this country from itself) forumites should rather see how they can help.

But it seems knocking any idea has become the national passtime of myBroadband members.
 
Last edited:

Odracir

Expert Member
Joined
May 13, 2009
Messages
2,056
Guys...dont forget this product is not really aimed at people like me and you. It will be aimed mostly at the lower end of the market. Poeple that cant afford a laptop or PC, but who happens to havea TV already.

Yeah right and once the surf the net via there tv we will soon hear stories of how these people lost their houses due to the high cost of the data.
 

Odracir

Expert Member
Joined
May 13, 2009
Messages
2,056
The majority of the country living off R2000 a month is going get even more poor if they get this and use Vodacom's 3G network. Lets see:

Food: R800
Transport: R400
Rent: R400?...
Vodacom/MTN internet bill: R400
Total: R2000

Plus if they go out of bundle for a few GB's (which will be common as the poor is generally less educated) then they're going to be working to pay off the cell companies for the next few lifetimes.

+1 Exactly
 

Odracir

Expert Member
Joined
May 13, 2009
Messages
2,056
Why is it that the very education your parents managed to get you through, to allow you the ability to post on an on-line forum, did not teach you how to think?

How many households in your R2000/month income (if they're lucky) are on contract with unlimited credit lines so they can run up an OOB bill? - None.

How many of the people that will buy this will sit and watch YouTube for hours, if at all, when they most likely only have GPRS speeds? - Most of them.

Last night the president promised school books will be delivered on time and teachers will spend 7 hours in class, yet it's not happening. Teachers are often as uneducated as the kids they must teach and often do not care about giving them a decent education. And even if they do really care, they don't have access to technology.

In South Africa, we have 98% population coverage by both MTN and Vodacom. But the vast majority of those same people are not PC-literate. The most technologically advanced device in their homes is most likely a TV.

Yet, at the same time, we have the Internet with near-infinite content. Up to now distance-learning attempts have failed because content was lacking on those mediums.

So:

- Where do you find as much content as you can consume? - On the Internet. Wikipedia alone is good enough for most school kids.

- How do you bring all this content into a home in an interactive manner? - Via the mobile networks.

- What do you give the users, where the average levels of education might be extremely low, to interact with the content? - some black-box solution that can use the TV as a display and do not require PC skills or maintenance.

What government and the networks should do, as a next step, is put these devices on a dedicated and subsidised APN with some proxy on the back-end.

I will gladly fund the education of a few kids in a disadvantaged environment using a device like this.

Instead of ridiculing attempts to further education (which is the ONLY thing that will save this country from itself) forumites should rather see how they can help.

But it seems knocking any idea has become the national passtime of myBroadband members.

All good intentions but these people who you referring to will soon feel it in their pocket (to have knowledge at what price?).
 

Aztech

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2006
Messages
265
@TwoCents1000

All the good intentions and technological innovations in the world mean diddly when mobile data rates are as ludicrously high as they are in SA.

That's not being negative. That's calling it like it is.
 

SaiyanZ

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2008
Messages
8,136
How many households in your R2000/month income (if they're lucky) are on contract with unlimited credit lines so they can run up an OOB bill? - None.

So they use up the 100mb then what? On prepaid they're still going to have to fork out a quite bit of cash. Either pay the high costs or don't have internet. Those are the only two choices it seems. Plus the smaller bundles are extremely poor value for money which is what most will buy.
 

_Stormy

Active Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2010
Messages
32
You might have the ability to afford, maintain and power a PC. The vast majority of South African citizens don't.

How many young kids out there would love to get access to Wikipedia for a school project or just learn about the wider world? How many (disadvantaged) parents would love to afford their children the opportunity?

But they're most likely not educated themselves and live in a community where IT support is not available. And you expect them to maintain a PC?

Just because you might be a spoilt rich kid with access to all the toys you want, does not make a product that can teach a rural 7-year old about Madiba or the planets 'boring'.

And, by the way, go read up about pre-paid, to answer your last, and as narrow-minded, statement.

Aaaaaah Shame ! Please wake up and do some "disadvantaged research". Not the reading type, the actual site visits...

Having had the opportunity to actually work in rural areas, you will be interestingly surprised at how many "rural IT experts" exists !! Ever wondered where your stolen goods end up - This not being applicable in all instances, second hand PC's can be "legitimately" (yip M$ - with XP) purchased from R 500.00 - R 850.00

Quite a few of those shacks, though not very posh from outside, have a bigger LCD TV, and Gomma Gomma lounge suit kitted, that not even I can afford at present.

The disadvantaged card has been played for way toooo long now. We went Democratic in 1994 - That’s 16 years ago ! If you have drive and ambition, nothing is to stop you from reaching your goals :( except if you’re a disadvantaged white person :)

In a year or two (17/18) all Matriculants will have had been “born-free” !

The brain drain ("white" emigrations) and the affirmative action’s, have placed MANY a disadvantaged person in positions they cannot fulfil. Why would government current be targeting "Service Delivery" ? Is it not the disadvantaged complaining over the “disadvantaged” not delivering services... ?

Furthermore, though I'm not a statistician, is the division not 80/20 (back/white) ? (At least back in the day, and please do forget the Indians/ Coloured / etc etc) Then why do I only see, on average, 3-5 whites to 120+ blacks in corporate site visits ??? Where’s the balance ?

This topic is simplistic enough to understand – THE DATA RATES ARE TO HIGH – Regardless if your “disadvantaged” or “a spoilt rich kid” as someone has to pay the bill. Even more serious if the “rich spoilt kids” complain over the data rates...

P.S. Looking forward to the first complaints/comments on illegal cell tower tappings ;)
 

farimir

Active Member
Joined
Sep 18, 2009
Messages
95
I did not say the data costs are not substantial.

I said it is narrow minded to think the 40 million+ people living in this country all have the luxuries people on this forum take for granted. And then scoff at some attempt to give access to information to these people.

You might have the ability to afford, maintain and power a PC. The vast majority of South African citizens don't.

How many young kids out there would love to get access to Wikipedia for a school project or just learn about the wider world? How many (disadvantaged) parents would love to afford their children the opportunity?

But they're most likely not educated themselves and live in a community where IT support is not available. And you expect them to maintain a PC?

Just because you might be a spoilt rich kid with access to all the toys you want, does not make a product that can teach a rural 7-year old about Madiba or the planets 'boring'.

And, by the way, go read up about pre-paid, to answer your last, and as narrow-minded, statement.

Wow, you make a lot of assumptions! Firstly, I think the spirit of the product is good, I think the company and the way they do it is taking advantage of the poor people. What I tried to say is that for the same money you can get a more pc-like device that will give a richer user experience. Also, Vodacom's data rates are a rip-off even for the so called "rich kids" so its even more so for poor people. I work every day with people who earn R150 per day and I can tell you that they would love to own a pc. If my mom and dad are able to maintain a pc, then they should also be able to learn how to use and maintain it. There should be a drive to lower the bandwidth cost to make it more affordable for everyone.
 

Beri

Expert Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2006
Messages
4,347
if vodacom or mtn was worried about the poor, why is prepaid so bloody expensive.
why not supply free or cheap internet to schools
 

_Stormy

Active Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2010
Messages
32
Just pondering... Isn't most of the internet fraud from Nigeria ? :wtf: What does this mean ? :sick: ...
 

Aztech

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2006
Messages
265
if vodacom or mtn was worried about the poor, why is prepaid so bloody expensive.
why not supply free or cheap internet to schools

If Vodacom or MTN was worried about the poor they wouldn't be Vodacom or MTN.
 

CeeBee

Expert Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2006
Messages
2,267
good idea ... for those who fall in the target market.
could add more users on the networks.... help reach the point where they can reduce Mb costs, without feeling they eating into profits?
vodafone intro video.... mmmole!
 

CAPS LOCK

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2009
Messages
5,797
This offer is as refreshing as drinking camel urine. My understanding of this offer, is for VC/MTN to position its teeth in a new avenue to fleece people with data costs, simple. There is no benevolent motive, those of you who purport that MTN/VC are catering for the poor blah blah blah with this offer must wake-up and smell the uric-acid, there's a distinct difference between "catering" for the poor vs "targeting" the poor. These devices will inevitably become expensive paper weights because of data costs.
However, If this works,then well done to MtN/VC, your shareholders will be selfishly impressed with your efforts, and may your headline earnings continue to prosper. :eek:
 

dkhaley

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2010
Messages
108
I personally think this is a brilliant idea. There are lots of people who use their computer solely to access the web and send email.

What the product offers is an affordable and easy way to get onto the web. If you look at how much the indigent spend on cell phones, it's easy to imagine they'd also be interested in data.

Already, South Africa has a high percentage of people who access the Internet on their mobile phone. I always thought that this would be the main way people access the Internet in the future. This device allows a family to have one common device that everyone can use, and allows people to have a decent sized screen.

As many people have mentioned, the high cost of data will be a limiting factor. Cell C has paved the way for declining mobile broadband prices, and if MTN/Vodacom follow this strategy the device will be very popular.
 

GerhardL

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2007
Messages
145
Great product, poor pricing- R750 per month is hardly the poor man's version of internet access. Also, in the same store you can get a galaxy tab that does more than this with more data for half the price per month? Am I missing something?
 

dkhaley

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2010
Messages
108
Great product, poor pricing- R750 per month is hardly the poor man's version of internet access. Also, in the same store you can get a galaxy tab that does more than this with more data for half the price per month? Am I missing something?

The way I read the article the R750 was a once-off fee, which includes the device and 100mb of data to start. After that, people would have to buy prepaid data recharges.

So a user who uses 1GB per month would pay R285. If they purchase larger amounts, the price per GB goes down. The price is still quite high, but it's still a better option than an ADSL package.
 
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