Inverter or non inverter aircon?

saflyfish

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Load shedding fried my current aircon.Is it worth spending the extra on an inverter unit for my home.I believe they have less power draw.
Looking ahead we are getting a generator and i was thinking that less startup power and less running power would save wattage on the gen for other devices.
 

Gaz{M}

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Can't comment on the savings, but they are definitely quieter (not turning on and off constantly) and also the "wind" coming out of the aircon can be set to any temperature you like. So it's not "freezing wind" or "smelly damp wind" on and off constantly.

They also don't crack and click as the plastic housing expands and contracts. That annoys the hell out of me.
 

SYNERGY

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Load shedding fried my current aircon.Is it worth spending the extra on an inverter unit for my home.I believe they have less power draw.
Looking ahead we are getting a generator and i was thinking that less startup power and less running power would save wattage on the gen for other devices.
I heard that air conditioners with inverters are more susceptible to power issues with our current load shedding climate... Blow easier etc.
 

Daisy Cloudskitter

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Agree inverter if poss. Ours is quieter than a ceiling fan, and temperature auto-adjusts by changing motor speed without turning the motor ON and OFF - uses less power.

more here :
 

Neuk_

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We went with an inverter unit and have zero issues with it, it is quiet, effective and energy efficient.
 

DrJohnZoidberg

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I also went inverter, cost a lot more but with the high price of electricity every bit counts.

I just set mine to automatic mode at 23C and it maintains the room temperature quite nicely. My 24000 BTU uses about 500-700W in operation once the room temperature has hit equilibrium (this will obviously depend entirely on the size of your AC and room and ambient temp).
 

Superjakes

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Can I divert this topic to discuss different brands as well? I have seen love for a couple of brands, but would be curious to see some opinions on how the different brands rank.
 

LCBXX

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Inverter. It's absolutely worth the extra money. It starts a lot "gentler" as well so would put your generator under less stress when you need it.
 

saflyfish

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I have found out from two reputable aircon specialists that an inverter unit is more prone to issues caused by loadshedding and blackouts as they have more motherboards/electronics/circuitry.
Also i have been advised that they are not recommended if youre getting a gennie which ill be doing in the next 3 mnths as eksdom goes further into the kak
 

Kosmik

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Can I divert this topic to discuss different brands as well? I have seen love for a couple of brands, but would be curious to see some opinions on how the different brands rank.
Invested in a 18KBTU Midea inverter unit, works like a charm, 5 year warranty.
 

Wasabee!

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I heard Clearline is a good surge protector brand in another thread. They come in DB form factor and socket plug type of devices.
 

Geoff.D

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Regardless, protect the AC units against power surges with appropriate correctly designed surge arrestors anyway.
Approach Clearline for solutions.

/edit posted at the same time as the above post.
 

Geoff.D

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Should we tag Westom to come and debate this? :p
NOOOOOOOOOOO! please not!
The more inverters that appear in our homes (backup power, systems, fridges and freezers, AC), the more crucial it becomes to implement surge protection at the incoming power and in the DB, as well as individual unit protection. In other words, Class I, II & III protection.
That is the sensible way to go about it NOT to run away from AC systems that are more efficient by installing older designs.
 

Kosmik

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I heard Clearline is a good surge protector brand in another thread. They come in DB form factor and socket plug type of devices.
Is it possible to put a surge protector after mains prior to the rest of DB board? ie one source.
 

Geoff.D

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Yes it is. Class II SPDs can be installed direct on the incoming power from the supplier, Ahead of the first CB or, immediately after an Isolator and before any ELCBs. Whether the new regulations allow this is another matter. 40 years ago, or os that is exactly what I did. I have Class II SPDs on Live and neutral before the mains isolator, which then provides power to stoves and geyser, and then to the ELCB which only protects lights and power sockets. That is no longer allowed apparently as stoves and geysers must also be protected by ELCBs or RCDs.
 

signates

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Installed two inverter Air conditioners over the weekend. Currently it's set to 23°. Electricity usage with both units on now and a few lights and 60" Led TV is just under 1kwh.

Lounge unit is 24000btu and bedroom unit is 12000btu. 20200120_210822.jpeg20200120_215243.jpeg
 

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westom

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Is it possible to put a surge protector after mains prior to the rest of DB board? ie one source.
No relationship exists between load shedding and transients. If load shedding is preceded by a long brownout, well, that can be harmful to motors. And does nothing harmful to electronic controls. Furthermore, electronics will disconnect a motor if voltages are too low.

Electronic controls can protect those motors. An inverter (not to be confused with a heat pump) to maintain sufficient voltage will also protect that motor from low voltages. But these are quite expensive. But then how often do voltages vary so much for so long; as indicated by major incandescent bulb variations?

Transients are a completely different and unrelated matter. Any protector that is near the appliance can make appliance damage easier. Protectors only do something useful when connected low impedance (ie less than 3 meters) to the single point earth ground electrodes. Because no protector does protection. Not one. Protectors are only effective when a transient is connected low impedance (ie hardwire has no sharp bends) to those electrodes.

Protectors must also be sufficiently sized to be rated as a Type 1 or 2. Those numbers are about protecting human life. Only a protector, that robust, can be located where it does something useful. Type 3 are so undersized as to need protection by effective protectors.

Type 1 are sufficient sized so as to be before a main circuit breaker. Type 2 must be powered from a circuit breaker. Type 3 should only be used when a Type 1 or 2 exists and is properly earthed.

Control electronics in any air handler must be protected from transients. Internal motor must be protected from low voltages - which control electronics should already do.

Protectors are about protection from voltages that approach or exceed 1000 volts. It does nothing for other anomalies such as a low voltage or load shedding.
 
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