Iran humiliated as 'five ships FAIL to seize British oil tanker in Persian Gulf standoff'

Norrad

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Jul 27, 2004
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oh dear, my bad
then i guess the little yellow submarine will rule the seas and prevail
I'm just ragging you mostly, but if we are going into future weapon systems what's to say Iran might not have a few of these bad boys by 2028 armed with anti-submarine measures? Just like your sub it's not yet available... but what if... :p

t-50_-03.si.jpg
 

Grant

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[QUOTE="Norrad, post: 23788719,
.. but what if... :p

[/QUOTE]
Aaah, what if...

What if a frog could walk upright instead of banging its arse on the floor with each jump it takes..
 

nightjar

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Just finished "The fall of Japan" pretty much covers what Nightjar said. Great short read and I recommend it to those wanting to know what ultimately brought about the Japanese surrender. There are lots of politics and other factors that went into it.
Fall of Japan is an excellent summary of the closing stages and the Nagasaki chapter is particularly interesting.
A gripping "must read" is MARCHING ORDERS - The Untold Story of World War II by Bruce Lee

One of the most remarkable books to emerge from the treasure trove of communications between the Germans and the Japanese intercepted by the Allied code breakers in World War II. Bruce Lee - coauthor of Pearl Harbor: Final Judgement (not reviewed), and an editor or researcher for a number of highly respected authors on this subject, including Cornelius Ryan, Gordon Prange, and Ronald Lewin--has reviewed the massive archive of diplomatic summaries made of the interceptions of the Japanese diplomatic communications, code-named Magic, and also interviewed many of the American military commanders before they died. Baron Oshima, the Japanese ambassador in Berlin, had remarkable access to Hitler and other German leaders, and his reports back to Tokyo are, as Lee rightly remarks, ``so devastatingly accurate that allied strategists might as well have been sitting in on the meetings.'' This access provides a perspective that most histories of WW II have failed to take into account, either because the information was classified or because of security constraints. The information crossing General George C. Marshall's desk every day was amazing: Hitler informs Baron Oshima how and where and when he believes the D-Day invasion will take place, and he is wrong in every respect; Eisenhower pushes forward on a wide front, which enables him to move decisively to take advantage of the weak points disclosed by the intercepts; the Americans decide not to drive to Berlin because they calculate it will cost 100,000 additional casualties (it costs the Russians 300,000); and they have no difficulty in persuading the British to agree to dropping the atomic bomb when it becomes clear that the Japanese military leadership will never accept unconditional surrender. The book is written in a rather irritating historic present tense, but it is an important, extraordinarily informed, and comprehensive insight into the grand strategy of the Second World War.
 

buka001

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I'm just ragging you mostly, but if we are going into future weapon systems what's to say Iran might not have a few of these bad boys by 2028 armed with anti-submarine measures? Just like your sub it's not yet available... but what if...

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How the hell is a concept jet ever going to carry out anti-submarine warfare.

Fast attack jets are wholly unsuitable for that.
 

alqassam

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My take on it, any war in Iran will obviously be won by the US.

But they will make it as expensive and difficult as possible. Especially on land.

The Afghan and Iraq wars were not easy for the US and those were in impoverished nations with decentralized governments or factions. With very limited support from the people.

Iran had a centralized government with support from its citizens. It has an organized army that has been training for the passes 30 years. They will make full use of all the mountains and valleys and make it a really tough, long and expensive war.
 

NarrowBandFtw

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How the hell is a concept jet ever going to carry out anti-submarine warfare.

Fast attack jets are wholly unsuitable for that.
Not really a "concept" when it's been flying for a number of years already:

but yeah, not designed for hunting submarines, they have Kilo class subs for that
 

Norrad

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How the hell is a concept jet ever going to carry out anti-submarine warfare.

Fast attack jets are wholly unsuitable for that.
Not as far fetched as you think. Russia has already said that a large portion of their SU-57 stealth fighters will be assigned to anti-ship missions using their new supersonic anti-ship missiles. Anti-submarine missiles do exist although very few are aircraft deployed, but they can fit in the missile bay of the SU-57 and could be used.
 

MidnightWizard

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the Americans decide not to drive to Berlin because they calculate it will cost 100,000 additional casualties (it costs the Russians 300,000);
NONSENSE
My late father was there -- told me how the Allied - British American advance was held up for political reasons
Read the descriptions by three star General George S PATTON -- commander of the American Third Army

That little bit tells me that the rest of what is written is -- RUBBISH / MISINFORMATION !


However, there are some firsthand accounts that indicate US forces arrived in Berlin almost a whole week before the Red Army. Shortly after their arrival they were told to retreat and provide support to the Red Army in the capture of Berlin.

US Forces in Berlin


ke insisted in Crusade in Europe, his 1948 memoir, that he acted correctly in eschewing Berlin, but he opined in 1952 and again in 1958 that the decision was a mistake. Signs of a breakdown in the Soviet alliance were already apparent at that point in the war, and the advantages of the political leverage Churchill desired over the Russians became evident when Stalin failed to honor certain agreements made during the Yalta and Potsdam conferences, such as his promise to hold a free election in Poland. As for Gavin, immersed in the complexities of Berlin for years after the war, the failure to take the German capital was a lifelong source of regret. “I have never been able to satisfy myself as to why we did not seize it,” he wrote in 1979. “Now I know that we should have seized it.”

Drive to Berlin
 

skimread

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Oct 18, 2010
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Britannia didn't rule the waves for so long by accident...big mistake by Iran.
Last time I remember Britain take action on their own was Falklands War in 1982. This could be interesting.

Will US muscle in as they are itching for war. My bet is UN sanctions but it will be divisive as everyone knows that will eventually lead to Iran enriching uranium that could be used in bombs and Israel and US trying to destroy all nuclear facilities.
 
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