Is it still worth learning to code in your late 30's?

SAguy

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Joined
Nov 4, 2013
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2,391
There is also a huge shortage of skilled cloud and devops engineers, even for juniors.
I would probably pay a very junior AWS cloud engineer R15k-R20k a month.

My expectation of this person would be:
- Any of the three AWS associate certifications
- Understanding of DNS
- Be able to build a simple apache web server securely
- Basic linux skills, including a little bit of bash scripts to do simple things
- Basic understand of cloud networks (VPCs in the case of AWS)

The above can be learnt in a year of part time self study just using free resources and a little bit for the AWS certification. It can be done, not sure why so many are negative about it here.

It may not be coding/programming initially, but from there you can easily grow into a DevOps role where 95% of your day is spent automating with scripting languages and not messing around in GUI's.

In my opinion age alone isn't the issue, it's age combined with the salary requirements of an older person.
 

Beyond.Celsus

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May 29, 2018
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1,776
There is also a huge shortage of skilled cloud and devops engineers, even for juniors.
I would probably pay a very junior AWS cloud engineer R15k-R20k a month.

My expectation of this person would be:
- Any of the three AWS associate certifications
- Understanding of DNS
- Be able to build a simple apache web server securely
- Basic linux skills, including a little bit of bash scripts to do simple things
- Basic understand of cloud networks (VPCs in the case of AWS)

The above can be learnt in a year of part time self study just using free resources and a little bit for the AWS certification. It can be done, not sure why so many are negative about it here.

It may not be coding/programming initially, but from there you can easily grow into a DevOps role where 95% of your day is spent automating with scripting languages and not messing around in GUI's.

In my opinion age alone isn't the issue, it's age combined with the salary requirements of an older person.

R15 - R20 is more than I get now.
Really not about the money and 100% being satisfied and content with what you do

A lot to take it, but will have a look at all these options
 

SAguy

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Nov 4, 2013
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2,391
R15 - R20 is more than I get now.
Really not about the money and 100% being satisfied and content with what you do

A lot to take it, but will have a look at all these options
The best advice I can give I think is to pay the couple of hundred bucks and go through a AWS course on Udemy, and then from there you'll be able to see if it's something you would be passionate about.

Being successful in IT requires you to be passionate about it and always prepared to learn and grow. Otherwise you'll end up like a lot of older Microsoft click-click engineers who have been doing the same sysadmin for the last 10 years and will still be doing it 10 years from now.
 

C4Cat

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Nov 9, 2015
Messages
8,541
My 2c - Coders are in huge demand right now and that's very unlikely to change in the near future (unless there is a huge solar flare that destroys all our electronics, of course!) just studying is not enough though, you'll need a portfolio, or some way to demonstrate your skill as there are a lot of people turning to coding, because of the high demand. If you can afford it, I would suggest looking at Udacity. Not the cheapest around but you get real practical experience and build a portfolio while studying. They also offer a lot of assistance in terms of job hunting, and offer courses that are up to date with emerging trends.
 

Nick333

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Nov 17, 2005
Messages
34,399
I beg to differ on the learning part considering we don't know the individual knowledge or exposure to computers either. I deal with many first timers to any concepts of coding and in some cases computers in general and to catchup after 30 becomes harder and harder never mind those after 40 getting their first exposure.

Don't sell yourself short. You might just have a natural ability ie. smarter than the average person in order to pick up coding at a later stage. This is more an exception than the rule at least from what Ive observed. Go on to any coding job search website and filter out anyone with even 5 year + experience and it would be very unlikely to find someone with 5 year experience not being in their mid 20s at most or someone with 10year+ being in their mid 30s and 15+ years experience being in 40s or older. The coders who get hired tend to at least start coding in their mid to early 20s, ideally even earlier.

I do agree that you can learn to code but there is a difference between being an efficient coder someone wants to hire and someone who is just barely competent as a coder(this category just about anyone can fall in to).

It brings me back to coding being somewhat similar to learning a new language efficiently. It is extremely easy and next to no effort to learn a new language, structure and usage, as a baby or under 10 year old however as you get older the synapse just does not play well anymore. This same situation occur with coding where it is not just about learning about classes , you need to be able to actually think through the entire process in some cases no different to how people communicate with speech without putting much thought towards it, second nature.
I'll bow to your experience then, because I can't claim much for myself. I suppose if you look at programming as a whole as a language what you say makes sense to me, but to a rank beginner that might be confusing if they think in terms of learning individual languages which, once you can work in one, are a piece of cake to pick up for the most part.
 

U-neek

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Joined
Aug 2, 2011
Messages
138
I can sort of relate a little bit. I worked for a retail bank for 4 years and was probably depressed for 3. It took a lot of adjustmenf when i finally quit.I went the Tech Support route. Comptia A,N, Security, Server,and Linux +. Then i moved on to CCNA and CCNP, VMware vSphere v6, ITIL, Cloud Computing Business and IT. Lvl 4 Tech support via Mict seta, currently doing lvl 5 sytems dev.

As you can imagine, it required a lot of determination and money to get the certifications.Your decision should be mainly about finances, its not easy going from a salary to none. Had to close my accounts and sell my vehicle to push through, so let that be a factor in your decision. Eventually my current company offered me a shot as Tech Support. Never looked back since.Not coding or anything but im actually content.

Hope that helps.
 
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