IT Graduate Salary

stixx

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2012
Messages
428
I was on the Standard Bank IT Graduate program in 2012. We got ~R23k per month back then. I would say ~R28k p/m would be a great starting point in 2020.

They have a standard salary for their grads depending on the qualification (undergrad, honors, masters, etc) but they can and will break that if they really want you.

Also, your marks dont mean as much as you may think. I didn't have the best marks (studying is too boring) but I got in. They look at you overall and what value you can bring to the organisation in the medium to long term.

Edit: Just to be clear, the salary figure is the CTC and not salary portion alone.
 
Last edited:

Nostalgia_06

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
26
I was on the Standard Bank IT Graduate program in 2012. We got ~R23k per month back then. I would say ~R28k p/m would be a great starting point in 2020.

They have a standard salary for their grads depending on the qualification (undergrad, honors, masters, etc) but they can and will break that if they really want you.

Also, your marks dont mean as much as you may think. I didn't have the best marks (studying is too boring) but I got in. They look at you overall and what value you can bring to the organisation in the medium to long term.

Edit: Just to be clear, the salary figure is the CTC and not salary portion alone.
Wow, thank you for this!

It was precisely what I wanted to hear, well coming from someone who actually did the Standard Bank graduate program.Your input means alot!

I have already started preparing myself even though I'm in first year trying to already read on data structures and algorithms and object oriented programming just getting more acquainted with key concepts I know are important just so I am well informed and able to work in big company like S-Bank.

May I ask, any other key pointers that you may suggest? I would appreciate the pointers and I know it may point me towards a good directon.
 

Stefan.dl

Active Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2016
Messages
45
When I graduated (BSc) a few years back, started at FNB with the graduate program similar to the STB one and I started on R312 000 per year. That was 2015
 

Nostalgia_06

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
26
When I graduated (BSc) a few years back, started at FNB with the graduate program similar to the STB one and I started on R312 000 per year. That was 2015
That's amazing, I'm actually looking forward to applying for the FNB winter school program and also they graduate program.

I've seen videos about it on YouTube! Thank you immensely for your input! I appreciate it!

Did you graduate from a Bsc in IT?
 

Stefan.dl

Active Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2016
Messages
45
That's amazing, I'm actually looking forward to applying for the FNB winter school program and also they graduate program.

I've seen videos about it on YouTube! Thank you immensely for your input! I appreciate it!

Did you graduate from a Bsc in IT?

Yes BSc in Computer Science. They have set salaries for everyone in the graduate program unless they really want you then they might go more.
 

cguy

Executive Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Messages
6,265
And I'm also interesting in quality assurance engineering is being a QA engineer/automation engineer a good specialization?

This can be an good path in companies that take QA seriously (e.g., Microsoft), but otherwise it is treated as the place where those who couldn’t cut it as “real” developers go.

Also with a BSc CS/Math+Homs, I managed ~R20k/m some 20+ years ago. Not a bank (software firm)
 

Nostalgia_06

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
26
This can be an good path in companies that take QA seriously (e.g., Microsoft), but otherwise it is treated as the place where those who couldn’t cut it as “real” developers go.

Also with a BSc CS/Math+Homs, I managed ~R20k/m some 20+ years ago. Not a bank (software firm)
Oh wow lol well thank you for clarifying the QA part for me!

It was informative!
 

CamiKaze

Honorary Master
Joined
May 19, 2010
Messages
14,208
This can be an good path in companies that take QA seriously (e.g., Microsoft), but otherwise it is treated as the place where those who couldn’t cut it as “real” developers go.

Also with a BSc CS/Math+Homs, I managed ~R20k/m some 20+ years ago. Not a bank (software firm)
I know of good developers that went this route because of "less stress".
 
Last edited:

cguy

Executive Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Messages
6,265
Oh really?

Is the pay relatively the same though?

It tends to be quite a bit lower (was about half the average dev pay at my previous company, and there are smaller tails on the distribution), although he is mostly right on the stress part.

For those doing the testing, you do your job, go home and you’re done. With development, when you go home, you’re thinking about unsolved problems, designs, planning, inter team dynamics, company politics, etc. Those doing automated testing tend to fall somewhere in between.

The thing is, when you get promoted (to management) in QA, if something that should have been tested but isn’t, there is hell to pay. It’s also up to this person to push back on unrealistic test plans, tests that don’t test what they’re supposed to, to bring up issues affecting product stability, when they determine an increasing trend in test failures, etc. (eg, code written by a particular employee, team, etc.).
 

Nostalgia_06

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
26
Yes BSc in Computer Science. They have set salaries for everyone in the graduate program unless they really want you then they might go more.
Shucks, well thank you for everything.

Truly appreciate it! I'll try my very best to get in!
 

Nostalgia_06

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
26
It tends to be quite a bit lower (was about half the average dev pay at my previous company, and there are smaller tails on the distribution), although he is mostly right on the stress part.

For those doing the testing, you do your job, go home and you’re done. With development, when you go home, you’re thinking about unsolved problems, designs, planning, inter team dynamics, company politics, etc. Those doing automated testing tend to fall somewhere in between.

The thing is, when you get promoted (to management) in QA, if something that should have been tested but isn’t, there is hell to pay. It’s also up to this person to push back on unrealistic test plans, tests that don’t test what they’re supposed to, to bring up issues affecting product stability, when they determine an increasing trend in test failures, etc. (eg, code written by a particular employee, team, etc.).
Oh wow, such an in-depth explanation!

I understand you 100%, there are some pointers that you mentioned that make so much sense!

I appreciate your input and clarification on how the two entities operatate! I truly enjoy development so it's clear that dev is the direction I need to stick to and perfect!
 

koeks525

Expert Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2012
Messages
4,795
From what I have seen, software developers getting their career started (straight out of university) tend to earn anywhere between R15 - R32K a month. In this day and age, you shouldn't settle for anything less than R22K a month... your CTC looks good till all the deductions happen. Cost of living is rising; a good company will give you the money you deserve.
 

krycor

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
16,615
I’d say in fintech avg (bsc) is 15-25k.. but that assumes you actually good at what u do to be on upper end.

So every company has a different set of requirements (language, framework) which I suggest you familiarize yourself with along with ensuring you can actually code.

Wait what? Yes I said it.. if I got 1c for every developer who can’t code I’d be a billionaire.. most junior interviews have code tests which often test basic problem saving. Often students focus on other things in their final year and kinda get out of practice ie. actually go on hackrank (codility for FANG like tests) and at least be able to medium tests before going to an interview that has a whiteboard part.

Trust me.. nothing worse than having a junior software engineer bitch about salary when the value determination was based on your poor performance. Thankfully most arnt as bad as fang interviews but prep..
 

CamiKaze

Honorary Master
Joined
May 19, 2010
Messages
14,208
Oh wow, such an in-depth explanation!

I understand you 100%, there are some pointers that you mentioned that make so much sense!

I appreciate your input and clarification on how the two entities operatate! I truly enjoy development so it's clear that dev is the direction I need to stick to and perfect!
Just don't get stuck in a bank for too long. This is the worst place ever that one can build your career as a developer.
 

Nostalgia_06

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
26
I’d say in fintech avg (bsc) is 15-25k.. but that assumes you actually good at what u do to be on upper end.

So every company has a different set of requirements (language, framework) which I suggest you familiarize yourself with along with ensuring you can actually code.

Wait what? Yes I said it.. if I got 1c for every developer who can’t code I’d be a billionaire.. most junior interviews have code tests which often test basic problem saving. Often students focus on other things in their final year and kinda get out of practice ie. actually go on hackrank (codility for FANG like tests) and at least be able to medium tests before going to an interview that has a whiteboard part.

Trust me.. nothing worse than having a junior software engineer bitch about salary when the value determination was based on your poor performance. Thankfully most arnt as bad as fang interviews but prep..
Shucks! Now that you've mentioned it! Leetcode, codechef, learneroo they all very good code practice sites!

You actually quite right! Proof is in the pudding!

To be honest, I was very nervous about coding and I started learning more practiced more coding e.g. with HTML 5 and now I'm more comfortable with it compared to 1/2 months ago! That's when I realized that I need to practice more problems and use other sources e.g YouTube to acquaint myself and get out my comfort zone only then will I grow going forward!
 

Nostalgia_06

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
26
From what I have seen, software developers getting their career started (straight out of university) tend to earn anywhere between R15 - R32K a month. In this day and age, you shouldn't settle for anything less than R22K a month... your CTC looks good till all the deductions happen. Cost of living is rising; a good company will give you the money you deserve.
Very well said!
 
Top