IT Graduate Salary

Nostalgia_06

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Feb 8, 2019
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I’d say in fintech avg (bsc) is 15-25k.. but that assumes you actually good at what u do to be on upper end.

So every company has a different set of requirements (language, framework) which I suggest you familiarize yourself with along with ensuring you can actually code.

Wait what? Yes I said it.. if I got 1c for every developer who can’t code I’d be a billionaire.. most junior interviews have code tests which often test basic problem saving. Often students focus on other things in their final year and kinda get out of practice ie. actually go on hackrank (codility for FANG like tests) and at least be able to medium tests before going to an interview that has a whiteboard part.

Trust me.. nothing worse than having a junior software engineer bitch about salary when the value determination was based on your poor performance. Thankfully most arnt as bad as fang interviews but prep..
Jeepers! Just went on hackrank it seems like a top notch site to practice code and be interview ready!

To be honest, I'm creating a file as early as now that I want to dedicate and focus it with everything that I consider interview process important e.g. Data structures, algorithms, discrete mathematics, database, networks... I'm starting now! By the time I need to actually use all these resources I rate I should be very well prepared..
 

koeks525

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It's more than enough to purchase a decent first car :)

Be careful with rushing to the car dealership... wait a bit before getting it. If you are living in Cape Town, that 20K is gonna end up looking like nothing very quickly. After all deductions (SARS PAYE, Medical aid, pension/provident fund), you will probably have +-R14K net. This still looks good till you have to pay Cape Town rent which isn't a joke... average rental for something decent is +- 6K a month. This will leave you with an odd R7K to survive on. Wait a bit till you get your first car... don't rush it.
 

Dark Agent

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Nov 30, 2008
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Johannesburg rates(CTC)
Graduate: R25000 - R30000.
Junior(2 Years+): R35000 - R40000.
Immediate(4 Years+): R45000 - R50000.
Senior(6 Years+): R60000+.

Starting low to get experience is bull. My first offer was R30000, I wanted experience and a real challenge I sacrifice for R18500, since then companies are bargaining max 10-20% increases after a jump. The above are market related salaries for Johannesburg. Any less then R25000 is a no go, but if they offer more then 15 days leave + perks, take it into account and reduce to R20000 min.

Standard bank offered: R28000 at the start of the year for graduates(well one graduate I know, some might get more), I will decline and not work for a bank. Bad for your career.
 
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Nostalgia_06

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Feb 8, 2019
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Johannesburg rates(CTC)
Graduate: R25000 - R30000.
Junior(2 Years+): R35000 - R40000.
Immediate(4 Years+): R45000 - R50000.
Senior(6 Years+): R60000+.

Starting low to get experience is bull. My first offer was R30000, I wanted experience and a real challenge I sacrifice for R18500, since then companies are bargaining max 10-20% increases after a jump. The above are market related salaries for Johannesburg. Any less then R25000 is a no go, but if they offer more then 15 days leave + perks, take it into account and reduce to R20000 min.

Standard bank offered: R28000 at the start of the year for graduates(well one graduate I know, some might get more), I will decline and not work for a bank. Bad for your career.
I Know a graduate that got offered R30 000 so he said! But I was a bit skeptical because I thought it was about steep for a graduate! But it's clear that it's quite common more especially if you're a top student of which he was!
 

Nostalgia_06

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Feb 8, 2019
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Be careful with rushing to the car dealership... wait a bit before getting it. If you are living in Cape Town, that 20K is gonna end up looking like nothing very quickly. After all deductions (SARS PAYE, Medical aid, pension/provident fund), you will probably have +-R14K net. This still looks good till you have to pay Cape Town rent which isn't a joke... average rental for something decent is +- 6K a month. This will leave you with an odd R7K to survive on. Wait a bit till you get your first car... don't rush it.
Shucks! You've mentioned some solid points!

The cost of living is quite high hey! It's ridiculous especially when you break it down in this sense!
 

User_X

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Oct 24, 2020
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Pretty much the norm in fintech. It can be anything from R15k - R30k, maybe even more.

Obviously depends on whether you have honours, your marks, type of qualification etc. Degrees like Engineering and Comp Science in particular will get you a good start...
Vey true, m in a graduate programme in a FinTech nd they started us with R27.5k. Some of us hav Maths/Stats/Actuarial degrees and some have IT qualifications
 

Nostalgia_06

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Vey true, m in a graduate programme in a FinTech nd they started us with R27.5k. Some of us hav Maths/Stats/Actuarial degrees and some have IT qualifications
Hey There please can I ask you a few questions maybe we can talk via email or even whatsApp if you don't mind? I want to ask questions about how to get into a graduate program and also how do I increase my chances of getting into a graduate program...a have more questions it maybe here is not the best place to talk in depth
 

R13...

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Hey There please can I ask you a few questions maybe we can talk via email or even whatsApp if you don't mind? I want to ask questions about how to get into a graduate program and also how do I increase my chances of getting into a graduate program...a have more questions it maybe here is not the best place to talk in depth
Most of these GDP programs are advertised at your university. The companies even come on compass to recruit.
 

Nostalgia_06

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Most of these GDP programs are advertised at your university. The companies even come on compass to recruit.
Yes, but as a student I think it's nice to speak to another person whose made it hey..it makes a huge difference. I just have a lot of questions that's all
 

R13...

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You didn't need English?
You don't really need English to excel at Maths, science, computer programming or other tech education. It helps if you do but it isn't an absolute - as long as you arrive at varsity with a pass.
 

User_X

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You didn't need English?
Not really, They are interested in ur analytical skills or ability to solve problems. but of course, as a rule of thumb u need some personal developmet skills or soft skills. that is where "communication skills" come in.

i got this opportunity through an agency, mostly Fintechs and sometimes investment banks recruit grads through agencies. agencies will advertise the opportunities and do all necessary selection processes then they train you for their clients(banks/fintechs/insurance)

Thats how i got this opportunity. i actually work for a fintech but deployed at Absa CIB. Also, banks insource from fintech because they(banks) rely on them(fintech's) for their(banks) technology software's
 

Johnatan56

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Did Software, not IT, and did honors level equivalent before getting a job.

Started at R32k CTC, and within a year went over R40k CTC monthly, about 50k CTC if bonus and time off included and averaged monthly for yearly. Tbh, after taxes, medical aid and retirement, this is not as much as you'd think (it's still a lot nicer than earning minimum wage/low salary, but don't expect that you can actually afford an expensive car instantly, etc.).

It's very much a case of knowing how to sell yourself, your skill, and the company being good (as in the company recognizes your work and has space to grow).

I know quite a few people that started at R16-20k and stayed there for around two years since they thought their companies would promote them, they never did and are now trying to catch up those wasted years.

The salary is important, but the work and company is as well, always ask your interviewer how long it took to get where they were, and if you click with the interviewer ask what you have to do to get to the same spot.
The reason I say the work is interesting is that it needs to be 1. interesting for you so you're motivated, and 2. something that allows you to grow so you have something to show at the next company.

If you don't get a dev at an interview stage, don't go to the company. A thing I like to do is that if you have a whiteboard question and you think of something more difficult or get stuck to throw a version back at the interviewer and then discuss that, this allows you take more control of the interview and shows that you're capable of reasoning/exploring paths as well if stuck. The reason for those interviews is to test the way you think, and showing independence/deduction is always good. Note this does not mean completely deviate from the question, more to show initiative.

I'd never want to get stuck being a unit tester/quality assurance person, I'd be bored out of my mind and the pay is less, but as others have said, the stress is a lot less, it's truly a 9-5 job, and there's generally a quite clear career progression path in terms of time. Going the software dev route, I don't really see that many "old" people, as in 55-65 bracket, as most usually burn out by then, and in the South African context, a lot of companies usually try and get rid of them as they cost more than e.g. 40-50 bracket that might have similar skill level, because dumb bean counters don't seem to understand that usually they come with a lot of business knowledge and tricks that avoid a lot of trouble down the line. So plan that you retire early 50s and spend accordingly. Software dev is quite a passion job, usually you can get the same/better pay going another route like accounting or engineering with a lot less stress and better hours (mostly, there are always exceptions), and people like cguy are an exception rather than a rule, but again, cguy seems to be very good at his job and he seems to enjoy what he does, I think he'd have been successful no matter what he picked.

If you can get a job as a junior/intermediate and most especially intern, always try and find a mentor to stick with, try and get him to point out flaws etc., don't take code reviews as an attack, take it as an opportunity to grow. If a company doesn't have code reviews or proper pull requests in place, leave, you won't grow there, and there's nothing worse than stagnation when you're starting your career.
 
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