'It's not a funky chicken jive out there' - SA army chief slams budget cuts as 'dangerous'

Visser

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Budget cuts at the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) could result in a lack of proper training for those who should be equipped to protect the country, the SA army chief has warned.

General Lindile Yam was speaking at a media briefing in Thaba Tshwane on Thursday, where he warned: "There is a danger coming and it seems like no one is seeing it."

He stopped reading his prepared speech and warned the nation about the consequences of several budget cuts the defence force has had in the last two years.

And he cautioned that when the military doesn't receive the necessary funding, it cannot fulfil its constitutional mandate to fully protect the country.

Although SA is not engaged in active war with another country, Yam explained that the military still needed to be ready through training, equipment and ammunition.
https://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/...chief-slams-budget-cuts-as-dangerous-20181018
 

Visser

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Don't worry General, I believe the government plans to increase taxes next year again. Just wait another year and hopefully there will be enough tax payers in the country by then to increase your budget again.... You should also ask the government to cut grants in the meantime.
 

daveza

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http://theconversation.com/money-ha...ricas-military-is-failing-to-do-its-job-81216

In line with the Veterans Act, a new body has been created to deal specifically with military veterans’ affairs. The new South African National Military Veterans Association is a public entity, state-funded, and accountable to the department. The SANDF is now increasingly financially and socially directly responsible for military veterans.
An analysis of the structure of South African defence spending provides a better understanding of the military’s budgetary problems. As a guideline, defence forces around the world accept that the budget, irrespective of its size, ought to be divided between personnel, operational and capital expenditure, more or less in equal portions.

In reality this boils down to between 30 and 35% for operational and capital expenditures and 35 to 40% for personnel. This represents the first major challenge in South Africa’s defence budget: almost 80% of it is for personnel expenses.
 

Ares1000101

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My dad was at a school reunion a week back. One of his old school friends he spoke to has just retired from the defence force.

He says there are like only 20 guys left from back in the day still trying to keep things running. And once they retire it's going to be tickets.
And that you have not seen looting and corruption like there is at SANDF. Apparently it is on another level all together. The amount of money getting pumped in there just vanishes. It just doesn't get reported cos by nature national defence is kept somewhat secret.
 

MirageF1

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#8
*sigh*

And to think I served nearly 24 months of my N.S when it still could be called a "force" of sorts only a few decades ago
 

ponder

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Meh, many sandf guys are old, fat or riddled with hiv.

We really don't need a big military. Terrorism in SA is not a military function either.
 

ambroseg1

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Meh, many sandf guys are old, fat or riddled with hiv.

We really don't need a big military. Terrorism in SA is not a military function either.
Not sure about the HIV, but the fat and old describes the same people that are supposed to deal with terrorism.
 
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#15
I have always wondered since Trump mentioned it.

Why do nations who use their armies for peace keeping missions, not get paid for it? As an example: SA in DRC, why do we as the tax payers need to fund the efforts in DRC. Why doesn't the DRC fund these troops and the costs associated with it?
 

ForceFate

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#17
I have always wondered since Trump mentioned it.

Why do nations who use their armies for peace keeping missions, not get paid for it? As an example: SA in DRC, why do we as the tax payers need to fund the efforts in DRC. Why doesn't the DRC fund these troops and the costs associated with it?
Allow things to get out of hand and you have a bigger problem. Rather calm things down at the source to prevent exodus of refugees.
 

3WA

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#18
Allow things to get out of hand and you have a bigger problem. Rather calm things down at the source to prevent exodus of refugees.
Yes, but why not force them to sign over some assets while we're at it? May as well help ourselves on the way out.

After all, the army's already there. They can't exactly say no.
 

seted

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#19
I have always wondered since Trump mentioned it.

Why do nations who use their armies for peace keeping missions, not get paid for it? As an example: SA in DRC, why do we as the tax payers need to fund the efforts in DRC. Why doesn't the DRC fund these troops and the costs associated with it?
Sounds like a protection racket.
 

skimread

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#20
It's not a chicken jive out there
He's wrong. I went to the recent military airshow at Waterkloof a few weeks ago. They had a live band of people in airforce uniform doing the chicken jive on stage while singing pop songs.
 
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