Kulula and BA’s Boeing 737 Max 8 planes – “We remain vigilant”

powermzii

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Interesting report about software bugs in other models:

Eish - this is one of those one in a billion scenarios that i doubt anyone would've been able to find in testing. Its such a specific set and combination of parameters and to be fair it only affects 7 airports. Still i guess given the increased glare @ Boeing this would stand out
 

Gordon_R

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Interesting report about software bugs in other models:

That is a curious bug, with very specific criteria (certain runways with direction 270 degrees +- 1 degree), fortunately able to be sidestepped by an FAA directive listing the few affected airports. Edit: A software rollback was also mandated.
 

Geoff.D

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Eish - this is one of those one in a billion scenarios that i doubt anyone would've been able to find in testing. Its such a specific set and combination of parameters and to be fair it only affects 7 airports. Still i guess given the increased glare @ Boeing this would stand out
This is the exact thought process that really gets my goat. Certain sw just cannot ever be not tested for all eventualities. If there are seven KNOWN airports where it occurs, then it is not a 1 in a billion scenario.
So much of this sort of thing gets swept under the carpet based on poor probability and analyses and cost-benefit studies these days.
 
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Gordon_R

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This is the exact thought process that really gets my goat. Certain sw just cannot ever be not tested for all eventualities. If there are seven KNOWN airports where it occurs, then it is not a 1 in a billion scenario.
So much of this sort of thing gets swept under the carport based on poor probability and analyses and cost-benefit studies these days.
The regulatory requirements are that a major (but not catastrophic) hazard should be low probability. Clearly this one slipped through the cracks, likely due to unforeseen knock-on consequences. A navigation error should not blank all the displays. Fortunately there are backup instruments, but this scenario is not ideal.
 

powermzii

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This is the exact thought process that really gets my goat. Certain sw just cannot ever be not tested for all eventualities. If there are seven KNOWN airports where it occurs, then it is not a 1 in a billion scenario.
So much of this sort of thing gets swept under the carport based on poor probability and analyses and cost-benefit studies these days.
If i understand you correctly you believe they should have caught this scenario? I'm not sure how they test the avionics and nav software in places, e.g. do they simulate landing at all rated airports from all approach angles, traffic densities and weather patterns? Without knowing their methodology i think it would be unfair to persecute them for this one specifically. Also the fact that it only happens on certain S/W versions might make it difficult to replicate in the other ones.
 

Ivan Leon

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Boeing's new CEO will get a R101 million payout if he successfully gets the troubled 737 Max flying again - Business Insider

Boeing's new CEO David Calhoun took over the leadership position on Monday, after his predecessor Dennis Muilenburg was ousted over his handling of two fatal crashes involving the company's 737 Max aircraft.

Calhoun stands to gain a bonus that is five times the rate of his base salary if he can ensure the 737 Max returns to service.

Returning the plane to service will be a challenging task, considering the plane has been grounded since March and has tarnished the company's safety reputation.

Read the full article at the link below:

 

Ivan Leon

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Boeing seeks $10 billion in loans as 737 Max crisis continues - Ars Technica
Planes still grounded as another software problem was disclosed Friday.

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Boeing is aiming to borrow $10 billion or more to help it get through the 737 Max crisis, CNBC reported today, citing people familiar with the matter.

"The company has secured at least $6 billion from banks so far, the people said, and is talking to other lenders for more contributions," CNBC wrote. Citigroup, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and JPMorgan already agreed to loan Boeing money.

Boeing's debt load has already increased substantially over the past year.
Boeing had $20.3 billion in long-term debt as of September 30, 2019, nearly double the $10.7 billion of long-term debt it had on December 31, 2018, according to a Boeing SEC filing.

By contrast, Boeing added less than $1 billion in long-term debt in all of 2017.

Boeing's short-term debt and the "current portion of [its] long-term debt" added together was $4.4 billion as of September 30.

Boeing declined to comment on the $10 billion in new debt when contacted by Ars.
Read the full article here:

 

Geoff.D

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How long is a piece of string? But in a society obsessed with putting elastic bands around watermelons for amusement, maybe they know how long a piece of string is or how much an elastic band stretches?
 
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