Legal experts warn that Truecaller is probably breaking South Africa’s privacy laws

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ I can merely say what happened and when it started to work again... (and I'm not the only one, see the linked thread)
If that's the case they aren't implementing it correctly. It merely informs that you don't want to receive marketing messages. You should still receive personalised communication and even about products you bought. It's not a blocking list per sé.
 
It is necessary to have, I need to know who all these idiots are that are trying to phone and harass me.
 
What phones are you guys using that you need to install third party software to get call screening?
 
My "acceptable levels" are zero. Opt out doesn't work. Especially for scams and for the "on-sell" spam calls you get from companies where you already have a product with (Dstv... Aaarrggh. Matrix car tracking... Aaarrggh.)

My usual reply to salesmen is first a polite no, if they badger it changes to 'did u not fkn hear me say no the 1st time?'
 
MIE transfers everyone's personal information across the border and they refuse to tell anyone where it goes.

They force everyone to sign an indemnity agreement forfeiting any legal grounds to stand on. So your personal information can be sold to anyone really.

I think you could probaly do an article on these guys.

 
Now MIE have a very interesting clause in their contracts. They tell you that once your data crosses the border, that they are not legally obliged to follow POPIA laws and you have no recourse to any damage done.
 
Truecaller is one of the few apps I gladly pay for the premium version. Its automatic call screening is amazing. My phone doesn't even ring when it is a spam call. Used to rely on the Samsung built in stuff but it is weak compared to Truecaller.
I've turned the auto screening off, and just manually decide whether to answer based on the pop up.

The issue is the false positives. I used to miss important calls from the back, medical aid, insurance etc because they couldn't get hold of me...
 
Lol "you" people and truecaller......

I have a much easier method.....Sure my method doesn't work for everyone, but I don't know or have family in the areas codes I have blocked so no reason these areas codes should be calling me anyways.....

I just looked up the VOIP number ranges and blocked them on the phone, unknown numbers get blocked by default, block 021, 031, 021, 011, 0860 numbers are blocked as well, rare for spam callers to be using actual cell number and if they do I just block the particular number and job done, rarely if ever get robot calls or spam calls these days, they use specific numbers and mostly VOIP numbers, blocking those isn't possible for everyone but works for me. My phone is also set so that between 8pm and 7am, any number that phones that isn't on my contact list get silent ring tone. Family and friends can get a hold of me if it is an emergency. When dealing with a business or company and require they call me back, I can temporarily unblock them. I will call them when I need something from them, they have no reason to call me otherwise.

Sure it is a mission to set it up and the occasional call will slip by, but much easier to manually handle and block than relying on a app that does god knows what, it isn't paranoia or anything rather if the app is questionable or shows ads it can get fked, especially when it wants premium subs to disable adds. I like my privacy and rather do it my self.....than rely on a 3rd party.
 
Now MIE have a very interesting clause in their contracts. They tell you that once your data crosses the border, that they are not legally obliged to follow POPIA laws and you have no recourse to any damage done.
I somehow doubt MIE can contract themselves out of POPI in that fashion.
 
The solution is easy. Close TrueCaller down in SA and suspend all operations. Focus on countries where they can operate legally and make money. Easy as that, Why spend millions on legal costs and then lose your case in any event and having to withdraw at a later stage.
The solution is easy indeed. Ban Vodacom, all car dealerships and anyone that has your contact details from selling your information onto 3rd parties and there won't be any need for truecaller.
 
I somehow doubt MIE can contract themselves out of POPI in that fashion.

I literally have a copy of their contract in front of me. Fed all of the small fine print through AI. There are some significant warnings to signing it, to the effect that, your data is leaving the country and you absolve MIE of all responsibility.

My broadband really should do an investigation on this.
 
I literally have a copy of their contract in front of me. Fed all of the small fine print through AI. There are some significant warnings to signing it, to the effect that, your data is leaving the country and you absolve MIE of all responsibility.

My broadband really should do an investigation on this.
Then the copy is not adhering to local laws and is therefor unenforceable.

The basis for enforcement of data protection laws is to protect the public against data breaches, both domestically and internationally. Many South African organizations transfer data both locally and abroad. Cross-border data transfers occur, for instance, where personal information is sent outside of South Africa to a customer, client, service provider or sub-contractor, or when making use of cloud storage hosted outside South African borders. Section 72 of POPIA sets out the requirements for the export of data while ensuring that the data is subject to adequate legal protection.
In particular, section 72 states that a responsible party may only transfer personal information to a third party that is in a foreign country if certain protections are in place. To provide personal information abroad, one of the following protections must be present:
  • Adequate legal protection: The cross-border recipient of the personal information is subject to a law, corporate rules or an agreement that provides an adequate level of protection that effectively upholds the principles for reasonable processing. The law, corporate rules or agreement should include provisions that are (i) substantially similar to the conditions for the lawful processing of personal information in South Africa, and (ii) substantially similar to section 72 of POPIA, relating to the further transfer of personal information from the recipient to third parties that are in a foreign country.
  • Consent: The data subject consents to the transfer of personal information.
  • Necessary for the performance of a contract: The transfer of personal information is necessary for the performance of a contract between the data subject and the responsible party, or to implement pre-contractual measures taken in response to a data subject’s request.
  • Interests of the data subject: The transfer of personal information is necessary for the conclusion or performance of a contract concluded in the interest of the data subject between the responsible party and a third party.
  • Benefit of the data subject: The transfer of personal information is for the benefit of the data subject in circumstances where (i) it is not reasonably practicable to obtain the consent of the data subject for the transfer, and (ii) if it were reasonably practicable, the data subject would be likely to give consent.
 
MIE transfers everyone's personal information across the border and they refuse to tell anyone where it goes.

They force everyone to sign an indemnity agreement forfeiting any legal grounds to stand on. So your personal information can be sold to anyone really.

I think you could probaly do an article on these guys.

Who the flip is MIE and how do they screen your incoming calls?
 
Privacy Laws speedster. That is the context here. MIE do background screening checks.
If you read the thread (or even just the headline) you'd see it's about Truecaller. Maybe start a new thread for your personal crusade.
 
The solution is easy indeed. Ban Vodacom, all car dealerships and anyone that has your contact details from selling your information onto 3rd parties and there won't be any need for truecaller.
Add to that list:
RICA
FICA
Banks, esp ABSA
Government's CoVid laws, where you were required to leave name, ID and contact details before being served at restaurants (but ONE example) - looong after the initial 'two weeks to flatten the curve"! **** that sheet! I told them to get stuffed!
 
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