Lightning struck our LAN; please help us solve it

Geoff.D

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
25,440
No personal experience with POE equipment so can't answer you directly. Certainly, surge protection on POE connected equipment is essential and would have to be compatible with the equipment being connected (cameras to routers and switches etc).
Fo P2P connections between buildings it would have to be something else.

My go-to company has always been Clearline.
 

DeonH

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2005
Messages
607
No personal experience with POE equipment so can't answer you directly. Certainly, surge protection on POE connected equipment is essential and would have to be compatible with the equipment being connected (cameras to routers and switches etc).
Fo P2P connections between buildings it would have to be something else.

My go-to company has always been Clearline.
Thanks very much. One thing I know for sure is that we don't have any POE equipment. Switches are powered up by transformer plugged into the switches.
 

Genisys

Honorary Master
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
11,091
If the data rate is what you want then forget radio and definitely wi-fi.
Then the solution would be to go fibre. Costly initially ( depending on the distance and technology selection) but after that, pretty reliable (provided the cable is well protected in a duct of some sort if underground, or if overhead, a proper overhead cable is used.

That would be the cost comparison (fibre versus any radio solution).
Lol?

60GHz equipment is more than capable of delivering Gigabit over a short link. Can even get decent 60GHz equipment that has 5GHz failover.
 

Geoff.D

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
25,440
Lol?

60GHz equipment is more than capable of delivering Gigabit over a short link. Can even get decent 60GHz equipment that has 5GHz failover.
So? table the cost comparisons. Then we can talk.
 

RonSwanson

Honorary Master
Joined
May 21, 2018
Messages
10,858
Use fibre.

Otherwise if you want to run copper LAN cable you'll need to earth the cable at both ends, and also where the cables enter the buildings, i.e. you have to earth four places.
Cat 6 yes, earth the shield at both ends, but what if its CAT 5/5e?
 

RonSwanson

Honorary Master
Joined
May 21, 2018
Messages
10,858
The longest cat 5e feed I ever saw was in Dar es salaam. 1 km down the road strung from building to building.
What signal was it carrying, what was its purpose?
Edit: Ok, in Tanzania it was probably providing electricity. :ROFL::laugh:
 

netcruiser

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2012
Messages
432
Cat 6 yes, earth the shield at both ends, but what if its CAT 5/5e?

This Cat 5e has an extra ESD wire connected to the metal connector.

 

Leno

Expert Member
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
2,339
Have you got lighting rods on your roof? (not the flagpole ones, the ones I saw were about 1m on the corners of the building)

Always noticed those on the towers and roof's that had electronics on, even if it was just an aircon unit

Also doing all these changes may cost more than replacing a 16 port switch every year or so (plus printer if it was hit)
 

DeonH

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2005
Messages
607
Have you got lighting rods on your roof? (not the flagpole ones, the ones I saw were about 1m on the corners of the building)

Always noticed those on the towers and roof's that had electronics on, even if it was just an aircon unit

Also doing all these changes may cost more than replacing a 16 port switch every year or so (plus printer if it was hit)
Hi. No, nothing. Buildings are as it was built 53 years ago.
 

westom

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2009
Messages
240
Hi. No, nothing. Buildings are as it was built 53 years ago.
Some cited a typical reason for all damage. Solution is based in what Franklin demonstrated. Lightning is a connection from charges in a cloud to other charges (maybe four miles away) in earth. If that path is anywhere inside, then nothing - as in nothing - will avert damage. Protection only exists when that current, from a cloud, connects to earth BEFORE entering.

Do lightning rods do protection? Of course not. Those are only connecting devices to what does all protection - earth ground electrodes. Franklin demonstrated it over 250 years ago. As taught in elementary school science. Only earth does the protection.

Does a protector do protection? Of course not. It (not plug-in ones) is only connecting device to what does all protection - earth ground electrodes. Plug-in protector (including UPS) has no earth ground. Will not discuss it. Is so grossly undersized that it must be more than 30 feet from the main breaker box and earth ground. To avert threats to human life. Only earth does protection.

Any wire that enters, without a low impedance (ie less than 10 foot) connection to earth, means protection is compromised. Telephone, TV cable, and satellite dish are required to have that effective protection installed for free. AC electric (the most common source of surges) does not.

If a human did not properly earth (ie less than 10 foot connection to electrodes) a 'whole house' protector, then damage is directly traceable to human mistakes. Every AC wire must make a low impedance (ie hardwire has no sharp bends) connection to single point earth ground. Either directly or via that protector.

That protection is essential especially to protect least robust appliances - ie plug-in protector and UPS. Anyone can read joule numbers to see why plug-in protectors protect profits; not appliances. Destructive surges can be hundreds of thousands of joules. How many joules will destroy (even create fires) that plug-in protector? Thousands? How many joules can destroy at UPS? Hundreds?. Don't take anyone's word for it. Go read those numbers. Urban myths and scams exist when numbers are ignored.

A surge is incoming to all appliances via AC electric. Are all appliances damaged? Of course not. Again, from elementary school science. It is electricity. It must have both an incoming and a completely different outgoing path. Incoming on all electric wires. What is a best outgoing path? Via that switch and router to protection required to exist on that internet cable. That cable must already have a low impedance (ie less than 10 foot) connection to earthing electrodes.

What is damaged? What protected a dishwasher, digital clocks, and central air? Network hardware made the better connection to earth. So it protected other appliances.

Damage directly traceable to humans who all but invited that surge inside. Surge went hunting, destructively, for earth ground via appliances.

Best protection cost about $1 per protected appliance. Lightning is typically 20,000 amps. So a minimal 'whole house' protector is 50,000 amps. Obviously, it must connect low impedance (ie less than 10 feet) to earth ground. Companies known for integrity provide them. Called Type 1 and Type 2 protectors. Properly sized so that it can connect low impedance to earth. Numbers define 'properly sized'.

A $3 power strip with five cent protector parts, selling for an obscene $25 or $80, is undersized. Called a Type 3 protector. It must be more than 30 feet from the main breaker box and earth ground to avert fire. Has no low impedance connection to earth. But it sure does protect an obscene profit margin.

Scams are easily promoted when one does not learn (or remember) above concepts. Such as what Franklin demonstrated over 250 years ago. And how electricity works (it must have both an incoming and outgoing path to earth).

An effective solution always answers this question. Where do hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly dissipate? A protector is only as effective as its low impedance connection to and the quality of those earthing electrodes. Earthing (those electrodes) are the 'art' of protection. Scams need you to ignore well proven science. Protection only exists when a surge is earthed BEFORE it can enter.
 
  • Like
Reactions: def
Top