Linux for the masses - is it feasible?

Brian_G

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New to Ubuntu with ver. 18.04.5 LTS 32-bit Lite on a Pentium Dual Core, upgraded from orig. Zorin OS9 CD.

...and the experience has been long, with too many mountains, and I'm a programmer! So how can segments of the community expect that it's something for the masses as they like to say??

Upgrades are full of errors, and you can't just get to the top upgrade - needed many hours to get it right, and some terminal and "DOS" knowledge to get there which isn't fit for use by masses.

Many fixes require really complex and detailed research results.
For instance, as a new user my Boot folder section shouldn't have been near full which prevented software (s/w) updates, and took permissions changing (not easy) and eventually highly complex terminal commands and gentle care to sort out.

Lastly, I've still got a couple of system files (security etc.) which won't download / install, which is toooo confusing for newbies. Yes, I know it's free so nobody is truly accountable for released errors, but then how can it ever really be stable enough for wide usage??

Sorry in advance if it's a tired, old subject... and thanks for any insights. BTW, now that I'm up to speed I am very happy with it :cool:
 

Brian_G

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Seems like you need a Chromebook with Linux support.
Thanks. So I googled it, found this;

"Chromebooks are a new type of computer designed to help you get things done faster and easier. They run Chrome OS, an operating system that has cloud storage, the best of Google built-in, and multiple layers of security. Learn more about switching to a Chromebook."

Not really for everyone, especially with the reliance on cloud storage, but an interesting modern option. I presume it gives little Linux setup trouble... at least compared to Windows.
 

Wakandafication

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How are you a programmer without Linux knowledge? You sound like a general consumer that shops at Game or Incredible for PCs, no offence.

Linux is so easy to install and use, there are tons of good distros. Possibly you're using a relic if you using 32bit OS, perhaps that's why you are having issues. Most machines that are 2010 or with DDR3 or newer can run Linux so well. I like Mint Cinnamon.

What CPU and Ram do you have?
 

w1z4rd

Karmic Sangoma
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Not sure how you can go wrong with Ubuntu. Its really simple to setup, use and update. I havent got any errors updating since I did my install.

I was pretty impressed with my pi`s version of debian. I have an install that I had not updated in a year (device was not used in that time), updated it, expecting something to break.... and it didnt. Well done to that team.
 

Rocket-Boy

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I have found that for the last 8 odd years that Linux has been really simple to install and with the package managers pretty easy to operate.
I still dont like desktop Linux though, I think it has a way to go before it's suitable for average users.

On the server side Im a sysadmin and I admin a LOT of servers, I doubt I would even know where to find things in a GUI.

On a side note, there really isnt a need to have a separate /boot partition anymore, it will generally just cause pain with kernel updates if you have one assigned and it isnt big enough. Pretty much everything can just sit within / these days.
 

Rocket-Boy

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Not sure how you can go wrong with Ubuntu. Its really simple to setup, use and update. I havent got any errors updating since I did my install.

I was pretty impressed with my pi`s version of debian. I have an install that I had not updated in a year (device was not used in that time), updated it, expecting something to break.... and it didnt. Well done to that team.
Rasbian is surprisingly good, I have used it for hosting my home automation platform in the past. I still have a PI running in my garage that controls my fermentation fridge.
If it wasnt for the lack of reliability in SD cards and better support for SSD's then I think PI's could be a lot more useful in schools for teaching coding etc.
 

w1z4rd

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Rasbian is surprisingly good, I have used it for hosting my home automation platform in the past. I still have a PI running in my garage that controls my fermentation fridge.
If it wasnt for the lack of reliability in SD cards and better support for SSD's then I think PI's could be a lot more useful in schools for teaching coding etc.
When I "sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade" on it, there was 1.5GB download. I sighed a little bit thinking, "okay, this has not been updated in such a long time, surely its going to break, it looks like its replacing most of the OS"..... and it didnt.

Manjaro (another awesome version of Linux), is not that forgiving.
 

w1z4rd

Karmic Sangoma
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New to Ubuntu with ver. 18.04.5 LTS 32-bit Lite on a Pentium Dual Core, upgraded from orig. Zorin OS9 CD.

...and the experience has been long, with too many mountains, and I'm a programmer! So how can segments of the community expect that it's something for the masses as they like to say??

Upgrades are full of errors, and you can't just get to the top upgrade - needed many hours to get it right, and some terminal and "DOS" knowledge to get there which isn't fit for use by masses.

Many fixes require really complex and detailed research results.
For instance, as a new user my Boot folder section shouldn't have been near full which prevented software (s/w) updates, and took permissions changing (not easy) and eventually highly complex terminal commands and gentle care to sort out.

Lastly, I've still got a couple of system files (security etc.) which won't download / install, which is toooo confusing for newbies. Yes, I know it's free so nobody is truly accountable for released errors, but then how can it ever really be stable enough for wide usage??

Sorry in advance if it's a tired, old subject... and thanks for any insights. BTW, now that I'm up to speed I am very happy with it :cool:
Im just curious. Why are you running version 18 LTS? Version 20 LTS has been out for a while now.

If you are new to Linux and Ubuntu you probably want to download the latest version.
 

KleinBoontjie

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Ubuntu 18? Rather get Xubuntu 20.10 or Manjaro XFCE. Will work better on your Dual core.
 

Brian_G

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How are you a programmer without Linux knowledge? You sound like a general consumer that shops at Game or Incredible for PCs, no offence.

Linux is so easy to install and use, there are tons of good distros. Possibly you're using a relic if you using 32bit OS, perhaps that's why you are having issues. Most machines that are 2010 or with DDR3 or newer can run Linux so well. I like Mint Cinnamon.

What CPU and Ram do you have?
Casual programmer who turned semi-professional, and years ago... all I'm saying is in my experience Ubuntu isn't for ordinary users.

Yep, a relic of sorts. All that many these days can afford.
It's a Pentium Dual Core, with only about 1.5 GB RAM - that's why I'm only on ver 18 Lite.
Not sure how you can go wrong with Ubuntu. Its really simple to setup, use and update. I havent got any errors updating since I did my install.

I was pretty impressed with my pi`s version of debian. I have an install that I had not updated in a year (device was not used in that time), updated it, expecting something to break.... and it didnt. Well done to that team.
Thanks, I think you've confirmed a suspicion - that upgrading the long route from the original Zorin version I used is what caused many hiccups.
Maybe it will be easy from here...

I have found that for the last 8 odd years that Linux has been really simple to install and with the package managers pretty easy to operate.
I still dont like desktop Linux though, I think it has a way to go before it's suitable for average users.

On the server side Im a sysadmin and I admin a LOT of servers, I doubt I would even know where to find things in a GUI.
I guess that's the rest of the reason why I struggled a bit.
On a side note, there really isnt a need to have a separate /boot partition anymore, it will generally just cause pain with kernel updates if you have one assigned and it isnt big enough. Pretty much everything can just sit within / these days.
Maybe caused by my start-version? I had no choice in the setup(s).
 

w1z4rd

Karmic Sangoma
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Casual programmer who turned semi-professional, and years ago... all I'm saying is in my experience Ubuntu isn't for ordinary users.

Yep, a relic of sorts. All that many these days can afford.
It's a Pentium Dual Core, with only about 1.5 GB RAM - that's why I'm only on ver 18 Lite.

Thanks, I think you've confirmed a suspicion - that upgrading the long route from the original Zorin version I used is what caused many hiccups.
Maybe it will be easy from here...


I guess that's the rest of the reason why I struggled a bit.

Maybe caused by my start-version? I had no choice in the setup(s).
With the hardware you are running there, the advice to install Xubuntu or Lubuntu V20 LTS is really good. I would go for a fresh install.
 

Brian_G

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Im just curious. Why are you running version 18 LTS? Version 20 LTS has been out for a while now.

If you are new to Linux and Ubuntu you probably want to download the latest version.
Can't use 20 LTS on a Dual Core.

Unless...
Ubuntu 18? Rather get Xubuntu 20.10 or Manjaro XFCE. Will work better on your Dual core.
So Manjaro allows it with a Pentium Dual Core, even though Ubuntu won't?
Not sure my RAM would be enough though.
 

Brian_G

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With the hardware you are running there, the advice to install Xubuntu or Lubuntu V20 LTS is really good. I would go for a fresh install.
Will do (or similar), when there's time.

Back to the topic though - how many, especially in Africa, are trying to do what I am... using old hardware. It's sad that many who try that Linux route will fail then.
 

R13...

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I used Ubuntu some years back and for most people what you get out the box should be enough. So, yes it should work for the "masses". Certain things like drivers and so forth do require a little bit of technical know how when they can't be found from their normal repositories.
 

w1z4rd

Karmic Sangoma
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Will do, when there's time.

Back to the topic though - how many, especially in Africa, are trying to do what I am... using old hardware. It's sad that many who try that Linux route will fail then.
Well, try a clean install and you will find less issues. I run Ubuntu on 5 year old laptop, because it runs faster than Windows (Windows is really hardware intensive). I dont think Windows is even an option for the hardware you have.
 

KleinBoontjie

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Will do (or similar), when there's time.

Back to the topic though - how many, especially in Africa, are trying to do what I am... using old hardware. It's sad that many who try that Linux route will fail then.
Why would you fail? Unless you have a 2009 netbook with an Atom processor (like what I have - lenovo S10) or a 32bit processor, you will find something that will work for you.

If you have hardware older than 10 years, throw it away or mount on a shelf as retro collection.
 

Brian_G

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Well, try a clean install and you will find less issues. I run Ubuntu on 5 year old laptop, because it runs faster than Windows (Windows is really hardware intensive). I dont think Windows is even an option for the hardware you have.
The speed is what has me hooked now, it's fantastic!
Personally I'm really not unhappy, now anyway, only going to redo when it looks worthwhile as my 18 LTS is stable and great.

This unit will handle XP, maybe Win 7, but not going back to that :eek:
 

w1z4rd

Karmic Sangoma
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The speed is what has me hooked now, it's fantastic!
Personally I'm really not unhappy, now anyway, only going to redo when it looks worthwhile as my 18 LTS is stable and great.

This unit will handle XP, maybe Win 7, but not going back to that :eek:
Your PC seems OP for Bodhi. (Its really Ubuntu with a light desktop). Its min requirements are:
  • 500MHz processor
  • 256MB RAM
  • 5GB storage space
 
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