Lion rips off toddler's scalp at Heilbron lion park

quovadis

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#61
No it's not ridiculous. And if we do the same with Rhino( allow them to be farmed for their horns, in reasonable conditions the same as other animals) then we wouldn't have a problem with them being poached in the wild.

You are also completely ignorant around all the thousands of petting zoos that exists for "farm" animals. Interacting with chickens and cows is definitely a thing.
Let me explain economics to you in relation to Rhinos. The farmed rhino horn will be more available and thus drive down the price. The consumers of said rhino horn would then place more value in the "WILD RHINO HORN" creating a higher price for the less available and "more potent wild variety" and thus the reward for poaching in the wild will sky rocket. Good for poachers - bad for wild rhino. Its the same reason why some guy producing keratin won't become an overnight millionaire.

I think you missed the point in the analogy in terms of the marketing of it.
 

rietrot

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#62
I'm more referring to things like the ivory trade and so on, those that unnecessarily harm animals very badly, me eating some cow isn't nearly as bad to the animal as they tend to be treated quite decent, no more murdering them by hammers or chopping them up alive as Africans would do.
Lol. With commercial cattle farming the cow stand in its own shît for a few months in a feedlot eating corn which isn't even it's natural diet. Pigs and chickens are probably worse. Commercial pigs and chickens are so sickly that if the "environment" they are kept in isn't kept completely sterile and the animals dosed up on antibiotics you get a swineflu outbreak.
Ivory trade is way less harmful. The animals have a long normal life and one day meets a predator in the field.
 

SAguy

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#66
Feel sorry for the little kid, obviously an accident but I also detest petting zoos.

Sure on one hand they allow children to see the beauty of nature up close, and hopefully they care morr about the planet than the last few generations did... but to go and pet the animal. No man.

At Spier you can pet a cheetah, but these cheetahs look like they've given up on life...just lying there. Wouldn't be surprised if its drugged as well.

Only wild cat conservation place I like is Jukani, they don't interact with the animals at all. All the animals are rescued from zoos, circuses, etc... and they don't even name the animals because they want give the cats to be seen as wild animals even though they could never be released.
 

thestaggy

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#67
One bad farm. That's a specific incident of animal cruelty and that owner should face the same punishment we give anyone else who doesn't properly feed or breed any animals or he should just be fed to the lions.
That was a brief search and my links were for two different cases.

A more in-depth Google search brings up way more.

Wits conducted research in to this in 2015, focusing on the Free State were there are a large number of farms. Poor conditions and inbreeding were rife.

https://www.wits.ac.za/news/latest-...-08/harsh-realities-of-lion-petting-zoos.html

Its a rotten, fvcked up industry.

http://www.bloodlions.org/the-brutal-industry/
 

Grant

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#68
zero sympathy from me.

perhaps a few more similar incidents may encourage people to not to support places that keep wild animals in captivity for commercial gain & entertainment.
 

gamer16

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#69
Lol. With commercial cattle farming the cow stand in its own shît for a few months in a feedlot eating corn which isn't even it's natural diet. Pigs and chickens are probably worse. Commercial pigs and chickens are so sickly that if the "environment" they are kept in isn't kept completely sterile and the animals dosed up on antibiotics you get a swineflu outbreak.
Ivory trade is way less harmful. The animals have a long normal life and one day meets a predator in the field.





Well, sort of, sure.
 

rietrot

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#70
So the guy with a few guns and a panga/chainsaw then?
Just to clarify. I'm very much against poaching. The laws against ivory trade also create the poaching problem. Prohibition/banning of anything creates a blackmarket for it.

The point was just that people who use animal products should stop being hypocrites and think the animals they consume are somehow special.
 
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gamer16

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#72
Just to clarify. I'm very much against poaching. The laws against ivory trade also create the poaching problem. Prohibition/banning of anything creates a blackmarket for it.

The point was just that people who use animal products should stop being hypocrites and think the animals the consume are somehow special.
But they are special, have you had a sirloin or some biltong? It's freaking amazing.
 

rietrot

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#73
But they are special, have you had a sirloin or some biltong? It's freaking amazing.
I've never had to oppertunity to try some lion. I still need to eat a lion steak before I can consider myself to truly be top of the food chain. I've had crocodile last December and do eat game meat/biltong on occasion.
 

gamer16

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#74
I've never had to oppertunity to try some lion. I still need to eat a lion steak before I can consider myself to truly be top of the food chain. I've had crocodile last December and do eat game meat/biltong on occasion.
Do let us know when you have, I too have had crocodile, it was vile, I most enjoyed steak of warthog a number of times, its extraordinary if you have someone who knows how to cook it.

And rooihartebees, bliksem.
 

quovadis

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#75
Just to clarify. I'm very much against poaching. The laws against ivory trade also create the poaching problem. Prohibition/banning of anything creates a blackmarket for it. The point was just that people who use animal products should stop being hypocrites and think the animals the consume are somehow special.
The ban on ivory was a direct result of a species almost being wiped out for the purpose of piano keys and billiard balls. You may see it as hypocritical to place one species above another however you need to consider the problem creating an entire industry around conservation at its core that is utter b*llshit.
 

Grant

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#76
Do let us know when you have, I too have had crocodile, it was vile, I most enjoyed steak of warthog a number of times, its extraordinary if you have someone who knows how to cook it.

And rooihartebees, bliksem.
have you tried longpig yet.
tastes like chicken i believe
 

rietrot

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#78
The ban on ivory was a direct result of a species almost being wiped out for the purpose of piano keys and billiard balls. You may see it as hypocritical to place one species above another however you need to consider the problem creating an entire industry around conservation at its core that is utter b*llshit.
What you have there is known as the "tradegy of the commons" a certain resources belongs to nobody/the state/the king/the wild and people overuse it until it gets depleted. To combat this you require private ownership and responsible farming.
A elephants farmer isn't going to poison his water source and kill all the animals in the area for a few tusk. That only happens in protected areas which has banned doing exactly that.
 

quovadis

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#79
What you have there is known as the "tradegy of the commons" a certain resources belongs to nobody/the state/the king/the wild and people overuse it until it gets depleted. To combat this you require private ownership and responsible farming.
A elephants farmer isn't going to poison his water source and kill all the animals in the area for a few tusk. That only happens in protected areas which has banned doing exactly that.
Let me spell it out for you so you can understand my argument. There is a difference between "Lion Conservation" and "Lions bred for petting, canned hunting, bones, skins and whatever other product" being marketed as "Lion Conservation" for the purposes of attracting tourists and customers.
 

Zoomzoom

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#80
What you have there is known as the "tradegy of the commons" a certain resources belongs to nobody/the state/the king/the wild and people overuse it until it gets depleted. To combat this you require private ownership and responsible farming.
A elephants farmer isn't going to poison his water source and kill all the animals in the area for a few tusk. That only happens in protected areas which has banned doing exactly that.
You clearly are unaware of the lengths private farms have to go to protect their rhino.
 
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