Lion rips off toddler's scalp at Heilbron lion park

WaxLyrical

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#81
Quite sure there have been millions of 4 year olds that saw the lions but didn't get attacked.

This is a special case as in the parents are special cases.
 

gamer16

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#82
Quite sure there have been millions of 4 year olds that saw the lions but didn't get attacked.

This is a special case as in the parents are special cases.
Had this happened a few decades ago, it would have been part of the acceptable number random casualties.

Good old days I'm told.
 

rietrot

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12,165
#84
You clearly are unaware of the lengths private farms have to go to protect their rhino.
No I'm not. That is because trade in rhino horn are still illegal. The farmer are protecting the animals at great cost to them even without economic benifit. If they could actually make some money there would be even more incentive to protect Rhinos
 
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gamer16

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#85
Like when we rode our bicycles in the street without helmets and swam in the local stream?
And set everything on fire, making little rockets with matches with a bit of foil and attacking your friends, I did that in the 2000's and a random Tannie went to complain to our parents, bitch.
 

gamer16

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#88
Pansy.

We made chlorine bombs and saltpetre smoke bombs.
As did we, however we were much more stupid and made a chlorine bomb in a glass lucozade bottle, was also dumb enough to through a massive rock through a old tv whilst standing in front of it, not thinking the glass has to go somewhere, and set fire to the driveway with petrol, which then got out of control and we tried to extinguish it with the hosepipe which of course just made the fire move down the driveway and set fire to everything else.

It was great fun:ROFL:
 

thestaggy

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#89
Yes. That is the norm. 90% of game farms are starving their lions. You are now qualified to become a journalist.
I missed your lol of a response.

http://www.bloodlions.org/south-africas-lion-industry-in-need-of-a-cleanup/

https://www.wits.ac.za/news/latest-...-08/harsh-realities-of-lion-petting-zoos.html

She approached a group of filmmakers who visited a number of lion farms, mostly in the Free State, to film the conditions.

The film crew also got an American hunter to organise a lion-hunt at a farm. The intention, however, was never to actually kill a lion.

The American and his friends were thrown off the farm when the owners became suspicious of them.
The Free State is the epicentre of the lion farming industry, so if there are widespread problems in the FS then it is safe to say that the industry has a serious problem.

Both of the linked articles are from 2015 and here we are, 4-years later and the same sh*t is happening. This industry is vrot.
 

quovadis

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#90
No I'm not. That is because trade in rhino horn are still illegal. The farmer are protecting the animals at great cost to them even without economic benifit. If they could actually make some money there would be even more incentive to protect Rhinos
So there's no economic benefit and all those tourists with cameras on game drives are just for show?
 

Sollie

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#91
I missed your lol of a response.

http://www.bloodlions.org/south-africas-lion-industry-in-need-of-a-cleanup/

https://www.wits.ac.za/news/latest-...-08/harsh-realities-of-lion-petting-zoos.html

The Free State is the epicentre of the lion farming industry, so if there are widespread problems in the FS then it is safe to say that the industry has a serious problem.

Both of the linked articles are from 2015 and here we are, 4-years later and the same sh*t is happening. This industry is vrot.
My view. About 10 years ago a business partner invited me to go hunting. It was in the Free State. It turned out to be a very large game farm where lions were also hunted. Annually a few Americans/Europeans would come over, pay a fortune, shoot their lion, the necessary trophies would be processed by a taxidermist and they'd bugger off back overseas.

Before any lion was to be shot, the lion had to be left in a large shooting camp. Hunting was under control of nature conservation with a lot of permits and red tape. No small camps as in "canned hunting". No drugs, starvation, feeding stations or whatever. The lions were kept very humanely.

Husbandry was practiced. The vet in the nearby town was on call (actually came out to attend to two young male lions that decided they did not like one another, one getting rather bashed up). This went for all animals on the farm.

The profits in turn was used to keep the farm running and the farmer make a living. It was not a case of the owner trying to become stinking rich. His house on the farm was surrounded by the camps, a normal average farm house, nothing fancy.

Over the years I went visiting many times. While I'm not tree hugger, I do love animals and nature, I grew up on a farm and understand the interaction between human and animals, the responsibility. I saw nothing on this farm that would make me uncomfortable.

At a stage the discussion also came around to the canned lion hunting issue. There were a lot of curse words. Just like in any thing, there was also a lot of abuse in lion breeding and hunting. In fact members of the industry(?) also reported unethical practices. But equally so, the news media was always also looking for a bad story. While many did not partake in the unethical side, this was never reported on with invites to view ethical practices were ignored: good news is bad for the news. So much of what we have are biased reports.

I later visited another farm for hunting in Limpopo. They were also in the lion hunting business. My observations and take was much the same, nearly a mirror of the Free State situation. I'm also not such an important person that I would justify the farmer "cleaning up his act" or hiding stuff. So I believe what I saw was an ordinary view which is a true reflection of daily running.

I believe a lot of the reaction is feels based.
 

Jabulani22

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Joined
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605
#92
I meant of the exact place the attack took place too , nice response though 10/10
Seems like some sort of inspector should visit the place as they were on the radio doing damage control and basically were pinning blame on visitors .
 

Sollie

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#95
I think it's fundamentally different.
Lady rents house on farm with chimps. Try to feed chimps, approach their inclosure and have her finger bitten off.
Tourist does touristy thing with the people of the lion park and gets injured.
I don't think so. Both were warned. Both had signs. Both enclosures where hands/paws/claws can get through. Both injured.

But anything we argue is conjecture until it's decided by a court ;)
 

crocopede

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Messages
388
#97
My view. About 10 years ago a business partner invited me to go hunting. It was in the Free State. It turned out to be a very large game farm where lions were also hunted. Annually a few Americans/Europeans would come over, pay a fortune, shoot their lion, the necessary trophies would be processed by a taxidermist and they'd bugger off back overseas.

Before any lion was to be shot, the lion had to be left in a large shooting camp. Hunting was under control of nature conservation with a lot of permits and red tape. No small camps as in "canned hunting". No drugs, starvation, feeding stations or whatever. The lions were kept very humanely.

Husbandry was practiced. The vet in the nearby town was on call (actually came out to attend to two young male lions that decided they did not like one another, one getting rather bashed up). This went for all animals on the farm.

The profits in turn was used to keep the farm running and the farmer make a living. It was not a case of the owner trying to become stinking rich. His house on the farm was surrounded by the camps, a normal average farm house, nothing fancy.

Over the years I went visiting many times. While I'm not tree hugger, I do love animals and nature, I grew up on a farm and understand the interaction between human and animals, the responsibility. I saw nothing on this farm that would make me uncomfortable.

At a stage the discussion also came around to the canned lion hunting issue. There were a lot of curse words. Just like in any thing, there was also a lot of abuse in lion breeding and hunting. In fact members of the industry(?) also reported unethical practices. But equally so, the news media was always also looking for a bad story. While many did not partake in the unethical side, this was never reported on with invites to view ethical practices were ignored: good news is bad for the news. So much of what we have are biased reports.

I later visited another farm for hunting in Limpopo. They were also in the lion hunting business. My observations and take was much the same, nearly a mirror of the Free State situation. I'm also not such an important person that I would justify the farmer "cleaning up his act" or hiding stuff. So I believe what I saw was an ordinary view which is a true reflection of daily running.

I believe a lot of the reaction is feels based.
So the person who not only financially supports canned hunting but partakes in it defends the industry. No surprise there. Personally i do not comprehend how you and others can find pleasure in shooting tame animals. But to each his own i guess.
 

Sollie

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#98
So the person who not only financially supports canned hunting but partakes in it defends the industry. No surprise there. Personally i do not comprehend how you and others can find pleasure in shooting tame animals. But to each his own i guess.
Please define "canned" lion hunting. Also "tame" lions if a lioness rears her cubs in a game camp - you are welcome to go and pet them (not advised).
 

crocopede

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Joined
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Messages
388
#99
Please define "canned" lion hunting. Also "tame" lions if a lioness rears her cubs in a game camp - you are welcome to go and pet them (not advised).
Tame' lack of fear towards humans. I would honestly love to see a canned lion released into a game reserve, and then approached on foot a few months after release. Also the interaction when approuched by a vehicle as some rehabilitation programs endorses feeding from a moving vehicle. If the lion retreats then perhaps there is use for canned lion projects in terms of rekindling the population and genetic makeup in some parks / reserves. Especially taking into consideration that our lions are considered threatened and Asiatic being endangered.

Unfortunately data on successful reintroduction of canned lions is almost non existent with the exception of Matlabas.
 

Sollie

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Tame' lack of fear towards humans. I would honestly love to see a canned lion released into a game reserve, and then approached on foot a few months after release. Also the interaction when approuched by a vehicle as some rehabilitation programs endorses feeding from a moving vehicle. If the lion retreats then perhaps there is use for canned lion projects in terms of rekindling the population and genetic makeup in some parks / reserves. Especially taking into consideration that our lions are considered threatened and Asiatic being endangered.

Unfortunately data on successful reintroduction of canned lions is almost non existent with the exception of Matlabas.
What do you think will happen if you take a walk in the Kruger Park and come across lions? Fear of humans? Many people trying to sneak across the border have found out that is a myth. That does not mean they are tame either.

As for vehicles, lions tend to be indifferent to them if parked. When they start up you may get a reaction, either aggression or fear.

If you want to talk canned lion hunting - sure, you have a vaild point. That's why I tried describing what I saw. Also the view from the people in the trade who most definitely do not support canned lion hunting. Not all lion hunting is canned lion hunting. It's not as binary as you'd like to see it.

https://www.four-paws.org.za/campaigns/wild-animals/canned-hunting/
Canned Hunting. The most extreme variety of trophy hunting is “Canned Hunting”. Most of the victims are lions, which are served to their hunters on a silver platter: The animals are kept in fenced areas and then simply shot. The lions are bred on farms and raised by hand.
 
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