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Load shedding will be a risk for the next five years

InfidelGastro

Senior Member
Joined
May 21, 2018
Messages
877
#4
Why hasn't this country started migrating to sustainable, renewable energy sources yet instead of just placing incompetent, corrupt, thieving and uneducated nobodies in charge of the energy supplier, hoping that one day the problems will resolve themselves if they just continue to raise the prices of energy delivery to hapless consumers.
 

lsheed_cn

Expert Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2008
Messages
2,573
#5
Why hasn't this country started migrating to sustainable, renewable energy sources yet instead of just placing incompetent, corrupt, thieving and uneducated nobodies in charge of the energy supplier, hoping that one day the problems will resolve themselves if they just continue to raise the prices of energy delivery to hapless consumers.
The end consumers will likely do that irregardless of what the ******s in charge do.
I've already done that.
 

Geoff.D

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
7,325
#8
The end consumers will likely do that irregardless of what the ******s in charge do.
I've already done that.
Unfortunately, it is only those that have the financial resources that will be able to make themselves independent of the designated central energy supplier. Ultimately, that process is will bring the entire country to its knees, so it is NOT the right way to go. Eskom HAS TO BE FIXED.

A centrally supplied energy strategy REQUIRES that ALL users of energy draw from that resource. IF NOT the cost to those that do WILL continue to rise uncontrolled. There is NO OTHER way but to fix Eskom.

The more that those can afford to withdraw, do so, the worse the problem gets. The ONLY OTHER source of funding is then the taxpayer which means continual and increasing government bail outs. It is a vicious spiral that this country HAS to find a way to stop.

All this is Electrical Energy Supply 101. If anyone wants a text book reference to read then here is one. Yes it is an old book, BUT the basics have not changed.

"The Transmission and distribution of Electrical Energy" by Cotton and Barber 1970.
 
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lsheed_cn

Expert Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2008
Messages
2,573
#9
Unfortunately, it is only those that have the financial resources that will be able to make themselves independent of the designated central energy supplier. Ultimately, that process is will bring the entire country to its knees, so it is NOT the right way to go. Eskom HAS TO BE FIXED.

A centrally supplied energy strategy REQUIRES that ALL users of energy draw from that resource. IF NOT the cost to those that do WILL continue to rise uncontrolled. There is NO OTHER way but to fix Eskom.

The more that those can afford to withdraw, do so, the worse the problem gets. The ONLY OTHER source of funding is then the taxpayer which means continual and increasing government bail outs. It is a vicious spiral that this country HAS to find a way to stop.

All this is Electrical Energy Supply 101. If anyone wants a text book reference to read then here is one. Yes it is an old book, BUT the basics have not changed.

"The Transmission and distribution of Electrical Energy" by Cotton and Barber 1970.
Or not.

Will you have the same issue when people move to electric cars and petrol economy is unsustainable?
The government has destroyed our electricity infrastructure by stealing the money through corruption or outright theft whats left in charge are mostly incompetent people in place.

I for one am not interested in supporting a corrupt regime.

There is no fixing Eskom as is. Its too far gone.
 

Geoff.D

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
7,325
#10
If Eskom is not fixed, then only those with resources will have power. The masses wont get any and the country then becomes a hotbed for violence between the haves and have nots. ( Not that we are not well on our way there at the moment already).
 

Stokstert

Expert Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2007
Messages
4,517
#11
Two or three weeks ago they considered shelving Kusile and Medupi power stations altogether as there was an imaginary oversupply of energy capacity, now there is a 5 year shortage.
Who is bullshytting who?
 

Swa

Honorary Master
Joined
May 4, 2012
Messages
16,092
#12
Funny how loadshedding becomes an issue every time they want a massive increase and then magically disappears once they either get a substantial one or it becomes clear they aren't going to. Why has nobody looked into this pattern yet?
 

LCBXX

Executive Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2006
Messages
9,566
#17
Nationalisation hard at work for the country. Remember to vote EFF in 2019, the ANC's Nationalist experiment!
 

noxibox

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 6, 2005
Messages
16,554
#18
Looks like about 57% of their debt is foreign held and the remainder local.

Two or three weeks ago they considered shelving Kusile and Medupi power stations altogether as there was an imaginary oversupply of energy capacity, now there is a 5 year shortage.
Not completing those was supposed to be a way to contain costs. And they justified being able to stop building because there was already excess capacity. Of course if they really had excess capacity they should be able to increase usage by offering discounts for using more.

They're very secretive, so difficult to determine the reality.
 
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