Load-shedding will return in South Africa

Swa

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May 4, 2012
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#22
So why was it off for 30 minutes at the exact time of our load shedding slot? Got up at 10, went to the toilet, suddenly it's off. Something smells fishy, and it's not my underwear as I don't wear any.

It will never end. It will just get worse until eventually, like up north, more off than on and no one notices or complains as its just standard, if on, bonus, if not, just another day... and of course, wmc/apartheid/jan etc to blame... I remember when it first started, everyone would rage... now, I look at nephew(11) for example, doesn't even blink, its just the way of the world to him, something he's had on and off his entire life... just an 'oh, shrug'... :(
People adapt. It's amazing.
 

MightyQuin

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Oct 6, 2010
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12,339
#26
So why was it off for 30 minutes at the exact time of our load shedding slot? Got up at 10, went to the toilet, suddenly it's off. Something smells fishy, and it's not my underwear as I don't wear any.
Why would they load shed for 30 minutes?
 

InfidelGastro

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May 21, 2018
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1,274
#32
That's my thoughts exactly. One NERSA approves the increase we will magically see things improve immediately
"Immediately???" Dream on. Although we'll pay through our butts to help them clean up their mess, "immediate" is just a pipe dream. They'll just squander all that money again without learning a thing.
 

Happy Days

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Feb 14, 2017
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#33
All of this makes me wonder if the guys that were saying solar doesn't make financial sense, are possibly reconsidering. I would be curious to see at what point it starts making financial sense (considering the steep 45% increase Eskom is asking for and future increases) as well as the peace of mind that comes with having an alternative solution.
 

Paul_S

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#34
All of this makes me wonder if the guys that were saying solar doesn't make financial sense, are possibly reconsidering. I would be curious to see at what point it starts making financial sense (considering the steep 45% increase Eskom is asking for and future increases) as well as the peace of mind that comes with having an alternative solution.
Solar PV currently makes sense for a grid-tie setup with little battery capacity. Large battery banks are expensive and often need to be replaced every few years due to low battery quality, deep discharge cycles, etc.

However if Eskom gets 15% increases every year for the next three years it means that we'll be paying well over R2/kWh which makes it much easier to contemplate even an off-grid solution.
It's definitely on my TODO list for 2020 or 2021 once I've replaced the electric stove/oven and sorted out some home maintenance.
I'll use a grid-tie, battery backup setup with PV panels and just enough battery capacity for a few lights and TV at night. Can probably do a reasonable system for under R60K.
e.g.
https://www.sustainable.co.za/axpert-mks-3kwh-48v-off-grid-hybrid-kit.html
https://www.sustainable.co.za/imeon-3-6-hybrid-solar-power-kit.html

However I expect municipal rates and taxes to sky rocket as a result of people switching to solar since municipalities make most of their income through electricity sales. :cautious:
 

spectrum.1

Active Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2014
Messages
68
#35
Business analyst Martin Kingston has labeled Eskom and its poor performance the “biggest threat to the wellbeing of the South African economy”.
This is due to businesses having to pay more for generators and fuel to keep running, and companies not willing to invest in South Africa until electricity supply is constant and guaranteed.
I live where I can watch ships at anchor in table bay.
In the good years (eg 2008) there were an average of 9.
Since July 2017 there have been none on average. Nada, Zero.
Even "the Xmas rush" at start Dec, was just a damp squib with one or two.
We are in sh it trouble!
 

spectrum.1

Active Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2014
Messages
68
#36
Do not forget the coming wave of electric cars.
Where/how will they charge and fare during load-shedding (which will be even more frequent if most vehicles are electric).
 

spectrum.1

Active Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2014
Messages
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#38
Actually, if you look at what you (& everyone else, & the government & army etc) spend on fuel, then electric powered vehicles etc, will become a MAJOR river in time of drought.
 

Paul_S

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Jun 4, 2006
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4,471
#39
Do not forget the coming wave of electric cars.
Where/how will they charge and fare during load-shedding (which will be even more frequent if most vehicles are electric).
Options:
1. Use solar PV panels on roofs to charge vehicles while at work and home.
2. If there is load shedding or it's night time then use a small generator to trickle charge your EV. It would be an expensive solution but if only done now and then for emergencies it won't break the bank.

There really is little need to rely on Eskom for charging electric vehicles.
 

Swa

Honorary Master
Joined
May 4, 2012
Messages
19,203
#40
Why would they load shed for 30 minutes?
Well that's exactly the point. Switch it off and then back on again. And just before that cell towers have issues like they usually do in adjacent areas when there's a rolling blackout but come back on when it's our turn. So why switch it off like that when there's not supposed to be load shedding? Seems fishy.

All of this makes me wonder if the guys that were saying solar doesn't make financial sense, are possibly reconsidering. I would be curious to see at what point it starts making financial sense (considering the steep 45% increase Eskom is asking for and future increases) as well as the peace of mind that comes with having an alternative solution.
Solar makes sense it's just a matter of to which degree. Eskom seems hellbent of upping that degree though.
 
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