Lockdown booze recipes

Toxxyc

Executive Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2012
Messages
5,086
yup, thats why i will never do distilling
i like easy recipes
im lazy that way
Same principle applies. "It's what you put in". If you don't have off stuff in your wash, you won't have off stuff in your distillate. Simple rules are followed as well - cut out the foreshots, save the hearts and re-distill the tails. The foreshots are used as hand sanitizer and stuff like that. That's where the vast majority of your "dangerous" stuff is located.

It's a simple science. Keep a thermometer in your column and you should be good to go. Or just play it safe and cut more than the recommended minimum. I think the risk of fire when distilling high-purity, hot ethanol on a gas stove is higher.
 

Defiler

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2005
Messages
600
careful with pressure cookers esp the whole methanol vs ethanol do proper research here

Totally! I would be twice as conservative with separating the heads from the get-go. Basically turf everything that gets boiled out before temps reach 80 degrees just to be safe. Of your total output, it's normally the first 5% by weight which is mostly methanol and other esters. So, realistically, I would probably turf the first 10-15%.
 
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NarrowBandFtw

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Feb 1, 2008
Messages
21,938
after a week of fermentation I end up with quite a dry flat batch, so I tend to bottle after about 5 days when fermentation has slowed down, but not completely stopped
you could also sweeten it after it has completely fermented out (aka back sweetening) with unfermentable sugars like xylitol, never tried it myself because I wanted a properly dry cider, but I'd probably prefer that to stopping fermentation early ... too scared of bottle bombs, or do you not use any priming sugar when you bottle that early? :unsure:

I use those Grolsch bottles with the swing caps
+1 it's the best thing short of kegging, ain't nobody got time for buying bottle caps and using a capper all the time!
 

Defiler

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2005
Messages
600
you could also sweeten it after it has completely fermented out (aka back sweetening) with unfermentable sugars like xylitol, never tried it myself because I wanted a properly dry cider, but I'd probably prefer that to stopping fermentation early ... too scared of bottle bombs, or do you not use any priming sugar when you bottle that early? :unsure:


+1 it's the best thing short of kegging, ain't nobody got time for buying bottle caps and using a capper all the time!


Yeah, I also prefer a dryer batch so never back sweetened or added priming sugar... After I bottle I leave at room temp for about 12 hours before I stick all the bottles in the fridge to stop the fermenting process. I have sometimes wished that it was fizzier, but I haven't had any exploding bottles yet... :cool:
 

Jonny_9

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Joined
Oct 19, 2017
Messages
303
Recipes
We all obviously know pineapple beer, but maybe y'all want something nicer. Like a fruity white wine, perhaps? Did you know that "fruity white wine" almost perfectly describes "mead"? I have a simple recipe: Honey, water, yeast, yeast nutrient. Now, we can't get yeast nutrient, so you're going to make your own... And herewith my recipe:

Tools and ingredients:
Sanitizer, like Miltons (baby bottle cleaner)
15l container
Big-ass spoon
Clean, drinkable water. Tap water works, but RO water works better (cleaner flavour)
1 x 10g packet of regular bread yeast
1 x packet of brewers yeast (never used this, but it should work). Can buy this at most supermarkets, corner cafes, etc. etc. and it's still sold during lockdown. Talking about those blue packets of Anchor Brewing Yeast
2.5kg of honey of your choice. I always recommend the most raw honey you can find, and don't fall for cheap chinese crap, because the flavour will prevail. A good bucket or two of local honey is perfect
Cooler box and a few ice packs if you live in a hot area, or it's still really hot in your area

Method:
0. Sanitize everything that will touch the mead. This includes the bucket and spoon.
1. Stick your honey in a waterbath with warm to hot water. Idea is to let it soften in the container so it mixes easier. Leave while you do Step 2.
2. Take the bread yeast and dissolve it in about 100ml of boiling water in a microwaveable container you can seal with a lid. Stick it in the microwave and nuke it until the solution is boiling, and leave it in there to cool down a bit. The idea is to make a yeast solution, and to KILL the yeast DED. This is going to be your yeast nutrient. If you can get your hands on Fermaid O - great for you, use that. If you don't know what it is, use the bread yeast solution.
3. While it's cooling down, pour your honey into the 15l container.
4. Add clean, cold water until you reach the 10l mark in the container. Mix it frigging, frigging well. ALL the honey should be dissolved in the water with NO residuals left below.
5. If you can, measure the temperature. It should be pretty close to 20°C.
6. Pour in about 1/3rd of your yeast slurry you made in Step 2. Seal the rest of it and stick it in the fridge.
7. Mix again, and sprinkle your packet of brewers yeast on top.
8. Store the container in a cool place, as close to 20°C as possible. It's turning cool in SA right now, so a cupboard or a pantry isn't a bad idea. Make sure ants can't get to it (maybe spray some insecticide around the base of the container).

Don't seal the container, but you can drape a cloth over it to keep out bugs. If the container has a small opening (like a bottle), you can slip a balloon or a rubber glove over the opening and pierce the balloon/glove with a needle. It'll allow the CO2 to escape and not allow anything back in. If you can't keep it at the 20°C range, stick the container in a cooler box and add an ice pack two to three times a day to keep the temperature down.

Within a day, fermentation should begin. After 24 hours, pour in another 1/3rd of that Step 2 solution, and after another 24 hours, pour in the last 1/3rd of that Step 2 solution. Let it sit for a week to 10 days. The fermentation should "die down" a bit by Day 7/8, and you'll notice how the foam layer on top will eventually disappear and "fall down" into the mead.

Taste the mead. It should taste very dry, slightly sour and it will possibly remind you of a Brut champagne. Pour the mead into another clean container and try to get as much of the CO2 out of the solution as you can. The idea is to get it "flat". Since you don't have chemicals to stabilize, you're going to store the mead this way, and sweeten it in the glass. Keep it clean and sealed, and try to avoid getting oxygen into the mead. Oxygen at this stage will create vinegar. You don't want expensive vinegar. Remember to sanitize everything that touches the mead at this point as well.

Serving - it won't be clear, and will be quite murky. Should be a light golden colour. To drink, I would recommend you chill to wine temperature, and stir a teaspoon of honey into a glass of poured mead. The added sweetness will break the dryness. Add more or less honey depending on how you like your wine - dry, or semi-sweet, or very sweet. A fruit juice concentrate also works (specially something with apple/cranberry) and creates a wonderful drink. The juice concentrate will eliminate a lot of the off flavours and give you a very "wine spritzer" type drink. I've done this before - and it's great! If you plan on using the juice concentrate, to save money, you can even remove 1kg of the honey and replace it with about 800g of regular table sugar. The lack of mouthfeel and body will be made up by the fruit juice and you'll get a very similar experience but for a few bucks less.

The above method should give you a mead of around 10% ABV, and yield about 9 litres of it (about 12 bottles). You can scale the recipe up or down as you please.

As a final note: I haven't made the above. I use a similar recipe and method for making a DAMN good mead at home already (including subbing some honey for regular sugar), so I just changed this up to perhaps work with household ingredients. Try it, let me know how it goes!
Good god man! Fantastic post. Thanks for all this info. Keep it coming!
 

SeRpEnT

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Feb 15, 2008
Messages
6,006
So using plastic bottles is a no?
(properly washed mind you)
 

The_Ogre

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Apr 30, 2010
Messages
25,878
Remember the idea is not to make alcohol. The idea is to make an enjoyable drink. If you want to make just alcohol, dissolve normal table sugar in water, drop in a packet of yeast and let it sit in a warm place for 2 weeks. You'll have alcohol, trust me, but I would be really surprised if you would be able to stomach it.
If I do this in a 10l bucket and drop three packets of yeast and 2kg sugar into it, would I be able to drink it by next weekend?

I want to get drunk, I'm tired of pineapples/apples, etc
 

Dan C

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Nov 21, 2005
Messages
29,740
my local sspar has 3 boxes ofd brewers yeast.... mmm wondering if I should try i have enough booze though more for fun than anything else :)
Think most of us are doing it for both (more for fun) and relieve some boredom. But I finally ran out of booze, so my pineapple beer will come in handy. 3 more days before the first batch :(
 

The_Ogre

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Apr 30, 2010
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Think most of us are doing it for both (more for fun) and relieve some boredom. But I finally ran out of booze, so my pineapple beer will come in handy. 3 more days before the first batch :(
Three more days se moer. I drink it the next day, I don't give a **** if it tastes like ****.

My batch for tomorrow consists of 10l water, two packets yeast. Two chopped up oranges, two chopped up apples and 3 cups of sugar :thumbsup:
 

NarrowBandFtw

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Joined
Feb 1, 2008
Messages
21,938
So using plastic bottles is a no?
(properly washed mind you)
food grade plastic bottles are fine, ones that previously held a carbonated drink preferably, they've already proven they can hold pressure after all

brown colour plastic is better than clear or green plastic, better UV protection for your brew, I still have some repurposed 2L stoney bottles I sometimes use to bottle beer, works perfectly fine
 

Jonny_9

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2017
Messages
303
Ok,

So i am looking at (constructive) tips to help my crude and unscientific pineapple cider along. I have to use what I can find in the shops.
I used one of those basic pineapple beer recipes on instructables.com to get me started.
My recipe of what I did so far:
4 pineapples in blender- skin and all
1 litre 100%pineapple juice
2kg brown sugar
2x 10g sachets bakers instant yeast
10litres hot water

Method:
After sterilising/disinfecting plastic tub with milton and hot water rinsing I added the whole mix except the yeast.
Yeast added after cooling down to just above room temperature. It immediately started visibly reacting which seems to be a good sign.
Closed the lid.

Will leave 7 days undisturbed- whereafter I will decant into empty plastic 2l coke bottles and leave a big gap of airspace below the lid.
The fermentation will continue in these bottles and they need a quick "burp" once a day.
If I leave these bottles out at room temperature they will continue to ferment?But if I place in fridge they will stop fermenting?

The lid is not airtight- it just clips on and had a flange.
I did all this 2 days ago. There are still some smallish bubbles rising from the bottom here and there.

Now what do I do? Keep lid on? Remove lid once a day and stir?
Am I correct in saying that about 70%of fermentation and alcohol production will be done in about 7 days. But not much fizz?
And the fizz and other 30% alcohol production will be done in the empty plastic coke bottles.

If I don't bottle, will the box of liquid go rotten? In other words, must I bottle all of it after 7 days?

And in the bottles- will they go rotten if not refrigerated after while?

Lots of info- I stated it all- with the point being to allow corrections and alterations for me and other forumites to adapt and improve and learn from those who have done this before.

Below check a pic of the box from day1: 20200412_180416.jpg
 

Drifter

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Joined
Dec 19, 2012
Messages
21,070
If you cant find yeast, use a table spoon of lemon juice combined with a table spoon of baking soda. Boom, yeast.
You laugh Toxicc?

Substitute Yeast

If you want to use baking soda as a substitute for yeast, you'll need to add an acid to the mix. Generally this is done by adding equal parts baking soda and lemon juice to equal the amount of yeast called for in the recipe. You can also use buttermilk in place of lemon juice or a mixture of milk and vinegar.

 

Snyper564

Executive Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
9,706
You laugh Toxicc?

Substitute Yeast

If you want to use baking soda as a substitute for yeast, you'll need to add an acid to the mix. Generally this is done by adding equal parts baking soda and lemon juice to equal the amount of yeast called for in the recipe. You can also use buttermilk in place of lemon juice or a mixture of milk and vinegar.

I think this could work for baking, as in have the same effect, but not sure for brewing....
 

internaut

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2005
Messages
692
Ok,

So i am looking at (constructive) tips to help my crude and unscientific pineapple cider along. I have to use what I can find in the shops.
I used one of those basic pineapple beer recipes on instructables.com to get me started.
My recipe of what I did so far:
4 pineapples in blender- skin and all
1 litre 100%pineapple juice
2kg brown sugar
2x 10g sachets bakers instant yeast
10litres hot water

Method:
After sterilising/disinfecting plastic tub with milton and hot water rinsing I added the whole mix except the yeast.
Yeast added after cooling down to just above room temperature. It immediately started visibly reacting which seems to be a good sign.
Closed the lid.

Will leave 7 days undisturbed- whereafter I will decant into empty plastic 2l coke bottles and leave a big gap of airspace below the lid.
The fermentation will continue in these bottles and they need a quick "burp" once a day.
If I leave these bottles out at room temperature they will continue to ferment?But if I place in fridge they will stop fermenting?

The lid is not airtight- it just clips on and had a flange.
I did all this 2 days ago. There are still some smallish bubbles rising from the bottom here and there.

Now what do I do? Keep lid on? Remove lid once a day and stir?
Am I correct in saying that about 70%of fermentation and alcohol production will be done in about 7 days. But not much fizz?
And the fizz and other 30% alcohol production will be done in the empty plastic coke bottles.

If I don't bottle, will the box of liquid go rotten? In other words, must I bottle all of it after 7 days?

And in the bottles- will they go rotten if not refrigerated after while?

Lots of info- I stated it all- with the point being to allow corrections and alterations for me and other forumites to adapt and improve and learn from those who have done this before.

Below check a pic of the box from day1: View attachment 821477

My 2 cents, dont stir. You dont want the sediment at the bottom to mix with the good stuff. Think of it as the poop of the gyst. Syphon the liquid into other containers if you can. The cold temps of the fridge will slow down to nullify fermentation.
 

Pineapple Smurf

Pineapple Beer Connoisseur
Joined
Aug 2, 2016
Messages
39,696
My 2 cents, dont stir. You dont want the sediment at the bottom to mix with the good stuff. Think of it as the poop of the gyst. Syphon the liquid into other containers if you can. The cold temps of the fridge will slow down to nullify fermentation.
i never stir my home brew
but this pineapple recipe i am using for the 1st time tells me to stir twice a day which i have been doing

should i stop? im only bottling on Friday
 

internaut

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2005
Messages
692
i never stir my home brew
but this pineapple recipe i am using for the 1st time tells me to stir twice a day which i have been doing

should i stop? im only bottling on Friday

I would say allow it too settle first before pouring it over and refrigerating.
Also there will be some slight sediment at the bottom after being in the fridge. The idea then is to pour it slowly as to not disturb the layer of sediment at the bottom.
 
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