Lockdown is losing the support of South Africans

SlowInternet

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Oct 11, 2006
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Most people are just "gatvol" of this lockdown. The economy is struggling and people are suffering. People have no money, they are hungry. It is going to take a very long time (if ever) for the economy to recover. We can only try our best with social distancing, hand washing, etc. Set some rules but open up all businesses. If you want to stay at home or keep your kids out of school, that is your decision to make.

Just now there was a women with her 3 young kids at my gate. She begged for work or any food. She said she will even take any food scraps from the table.

We gave her some bread, mealie meal and a bag of oranges. (I can go to the shop again and replace my products but there are millions of people of all races that cannot) The smallest child was so excited about the oranges that she tried to carry it herself. The kids were between 3-7 years old. **** man, we cannot let any people suffer like this!

I know my complaining/ranting will not help anything but I'm just gatvol.
 

Groen92

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Apr 16, 2020
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You people tell me when you have fully organized yourselves, I will lead you since I am obviously more experienced in protests, I don't trust you to do it right.

Go forth and gather some grannies; help them be less cringey.
 

lexity

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Jan 31, 2020
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Oh... I thought it was blindingly obvious that I'm taking the piss out of you... Clearly not, I suppose I will have to be a bit less subtle next time.
I think you walked straight into that one.

Getting back on point, when someone claims to have the best interest of his community at heart and yet does everything in his power to relieve individuals, in that community, of individual responsibility for the decisions they make.... well, as they used to teach us as kids, just say no. Somewhere along the line they got mixed up in the wrong crowd. Do your best to keep your distance.
 

ToxicBunny

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I think you walked straight into that one.

Getting back on point, when someone claims to have the best interest of his community at heart and yet does everything in his power to relieve individuals, in that community, of individual responsibility for the decisions they make.... well, as they used to teach us as kids, just say no. Somewhere along the line they got mixed up in the wrong crowd. Do your best to keep your distance.
There wasn't really a point other than taking the piss out of you pretty much... Sovereign citizen bollocks and all...
 

noxibox

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Apr 6, 2005
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The elephant in the room, here, is the absence of the freedom to withdraw one's association.

If it were legal to do this, then it wouldn't matter if the elected opted to ignore good advice.
But you can do so. There's a whole planet out there. I'm sure you can find some corner somewhere to set up your own little fiefdom. You can even have your free for all market.

South Africans seem to struggle to organize themselves... :(

The lockdown is pretty much universally unsupported but there is no unification of the different groups.
I can see value in legal action, because South Africa does have law designed to keep the government in check.

I don't know that protest has much value other than as a means to see whether the government ignores it or responds with violence. That applies across countries. Examples can be found in various supposedly free countries of the government responding to protest with violence. Now the same can apply to widespread civil disobedience, but it does have the advantage of not requiring organisation.
 

lexity

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Jan 31, 2020
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But you can do so. There's a whole planet out there. I'm sure you can find some corner somewhere to set up your own little fiefdom. You can even have your free for all market.
You realize the irony of that statement, if all 192 governments say they are equally open to self-determination i.e. closed.

I don't believe current governments can afford to be so closed, when it really comes down to it. They brag every election cycle about how pro- self-rule/representative-government they are. Seems to buy them the 5-year control they so desperately seek, with little or no push-back from the electorate.... as times like these would seem to indicate.

Truthfully, they would far rather the topic of self-government and secession never surfaced above the racism chatter and general agitation of Left vs Right and vice versa. They are probably aware how popular the idea would be if the average net-producer gave it a moment's thought.

Reminds me of the Cape Party's line: 'If we secede today, into a Cape Republic, tomorrow morning we could halve taxes and double services.'

Even so, why go abroad when nobody disagrees in principle with the idea of self-government. I haven't heard any arguments against it, let alone convincing arguments. At least not so far. Perhaps I will one day... perhaps someone will give me a convincing argument for why the cost of their bad decisions should be subsidized or paid for entirely by others, backed by the threat of violence.
 

friedpiggy

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Aug 6, 2005
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I have a different take on the petitions. We all know that the government doesn't either read them or care about them. The point to me behind a petition is not to get the politicians to change their minds, it is to make a record of the objection. Take tobacco for example. At the time of FITA launching their legal challenge, the reasoning behind the ban was due to the 2000 objections to tobacco (well that was the reason they gave the public) FITA can go to court and show that more than 600 000 were opposed to the ban. It gives a record of what the public wanted at the time. The court can then see what was wanted and use that to ask govt. wtf they were thinking and force them to change the rules.

So yes, petitions are important from a record-keeping point of view.
 

Gordon_R

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Long overdue admission of reality by cabinet members to parliament:
Health Minister Zweli Mkhize put his finger on an inherent contradiction in South Africa’s Covid-19 lockdown strategy – while the World Health Organisation criteria tie together any easing of lockdown with slowing infection rates, in South Africa, this comes just as numbers of Covid-19 cases are on the up.

“We’ve actually had to move on and reopen [the economy]… The reason for it is because there’s a problem, a crisis of hunger, income, economic recession and social distress,” Mkhize told the National Council of Provinces (NCOP) on Tuesday.
Earlier in the same briefing, Co-operative Governance Minister Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma also put front and centre the economy and livelihoods.

“With the closing of business, we have seen how the livelihoods are being undermined. And that’s why we have the reopening…”
 
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Gordon_R

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Trust levels in the government were low before the epidemic, they must be rock bottom by now:
 

Lupus

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Trust levels in the government were low before the epidemic, they must be rock bottom by now:
Then you've got one minister saying one thing and another coming on changing it. There needs to be clear concise things mentioned. Though after 9 weeks this thing should end now, we did it way to early and when places like Italy are opening up, you know we cannot remain locked down forever.
 

SlowInternet

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It's unbelievable what some people can do with a pair of scissors. I feel so "light headed" after watching somebody.
 

Gordon_R

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Lengthy and detailed public opinion survey on the lockdown and related issues:
South Africans trust the president and approve of his leadership; however, this trust has slightly declined over the past four weeks.
Adherence to lockdown regulations are high, yet many people are breaking the regulations which put South Africans at risk of increased infection.

Personal responsibility is high as most people agree that they should take responsibility for their own health and well being as opposed to relying on government.
In terms of employment, 43% of people are temporarily not working due to the lockdown. Businesses are struggling to support employees, and many are facing retrenchments or salary reductions.

Only 37% of respondents have enough money for the next few weeks, while 89% of respondents are economically red-zoned at this point and require immediate economic release.
The need for food parcels remains high and is seen as the most important way in which government can assist vulnerable communities, while only 10% indicate that they have received food parcels from government.

Nearly 50% of respondents noted that vulnerable people in their community had not received food parcels.
 
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lexity

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Jan 31, 2020
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'Public still trusts Ramaphosa, but NDZ not so much'

When I see headlines like this, the first phrase that springs to mind is 'the tail wagging the dog'.

I mean come on. You're informing the public not what they do, but what you think they should do.

The second part is probably true, but riding in on the coat-tails of the truth is the propaganda i.e. the first part.

The guy is as independently-minded as a hand-puppet.
 
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