Looking for a NTSC (of US origin) VCR

PaulB_

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Hi all.


I am seeking a NTSC VCR, preferably of US origin.

I need to get some US recorded tapes transferred to digital, and although they are playable on my PAL VCR, I am not happy with the picture output, and would prefer to see if I can obtain a ex USA VCR to get the best picture quality possibly.

Thanks in advance.
 

Gordon_R

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Almost all VCRs are multi-function, and able to read and write any format. There should be no reason why a US made VCR would produce different results.
 

PaulB_

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Almost all VCRs are multi-function, and able to read and write any format. There should be no reason why a US made VCR would produce different results.
Different TV systems. One cannot playback a PAL tape on a NTSC unit, and many older PAL machines available in Europe, and SA don't play back NTSC tapes. More modern ones do, but due to differences in the format between NTSC & PAL, there may be issues with playback.
 

Gordon_R

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Different TV systems. One cannot playback a PAL tape on a NTSC unit, and many older PAL machines available in Europe, and SA don't play back NTSC tapes. More modern ones do, but due to differences in the format between NTSC & PAL, there may be issues with playback.

The instruction manual on my old VCR disagrees. Yours may differ.
 

Dairyfarmer

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Different TV systems. One cannot playback a PAL tape on a NTSC unit, and many older PAL machines available in Europe, and SA don't play back NTSC tapes. More modern ones do, but due to differences in the format between NTSC & PAL, there may be issues with playback.
The last time I bought a VCR (more than 25 years ago) they all supported PAL, NTSC, and SECAM.

You can try Amazon. Probably land one in SA for under R3K
New old stock:
 

Gambit

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My PAL VCR can play NTSC and SECAM tapes but it can only output a PAL signal. The NTSC signal is always converted to PAL. I can imagine that this conversion from NTSC to PAL can probably degrade the quality because the NTSC format sacrifices lines of resolution for a 4% higher frame rate. This means that frames will be dropped and also I think the audio speed and pitch can be affected. It does make sense to video capture the original format.
 

itareanlnotani

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Don't forget - US is 120v, so you'll also need a voltage adaptor (120v -> 220v) to prevent the magic smoke from getting out.

I'm pretty sure I've seen VCRs that can output in either NTSC or PAL (either by a switch on the vcr or remote), but its been a few years.

Might be worth asking some photo shops if they still offer digitization services.
 

Gambit

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Don't forget - US is 120v, so you'll also need a voltage adaptor (120v -> 220v) to prevent the magic smoke from getting out.
Stepping down the 240v to 120v is usually the easy part. If the VCR doesn't support 50 Hz AC then you have to figure a way to get 60Hz AC which usually involves using a rectifier and a 60Hz inverter
 
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Gambit

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Maybe easier to ship the tapes to a conversion service in the US.
 

itareanlnotani

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Stepping down the 240v to 120v is usually the easy part. If the VCR doesn't support 50 Hz AC then you have to figure a way to get 60Hz AC which usually involves using a rectifier and a 60Hz inverter
True, a lot of equipment will use the AC frequency to determine speed. Which is why a lot of alarm clocks go off time quickly in SA, as Eskom wanders up and down around 50hz. I've seen 46hz-52hz when i had a grid connection, and solar. My solar side would trip as it was past the specs, I'd check, and oh, Eskom again...
Thankfully I don't have to deal with that for a few years now.
 

Dairyfarmer

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Stepping down the 240v to 120v is usually the easy part. If the VCR doesn't support 50 Hz AC then you have to figure a way to get 60Hz AC which usually involves using a rectifier and a 60Hz inverter
I think the last few generations of vcr's were set to handle either voltage and Hz like most electronics from a few decades back.
 
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