Lufthansa sues passenger who skipped his flight

Nerfherder

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#41
Yes. Disregarding the fact that with overbooking they had every chance of giving his seat to someone else.
Imagine a company suing a customer for showing up how stupid the airline pricing models are .......

Let us hope that the Appeal Court also rules in the passengers favour. It is log overdue that airlines sort out their pricing models. Just as it is for just about every other consumer intesive industry.
The irony is that in this case assuming he did not check in they would have sold his seat to someone who was ready to go.... same as if he had missed the flight because of a delay.
 

NarrowBandFtw

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#42
I think it is a problem for an airline in that they had to wait for the people to arrive for the flight, potentially delaying the flight.
He would not have checked in, if you don't check in, they don't wait, not even for 1 minute.

How did they get their luggage as this is normally booked through to the final destination?
It wasn't a connecting flight, it was a multi-stop flight i.e. he planned to disembark at the first stop and booked accordingly.
 

Moosedrool

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#43
I'll also do this.

The pricing model is retarded and technically this shouldn't be possible.

In this instance, I hope there is EU (or country) law to prevent this nonsense from airlines. I'm not sure there is though.
Or you don't sell a person more apple than he wants to eat for cheaper.
 

JimmyRott

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#44
Is there a chance that the airline has a quota to fill on their vancouver route? And that their pricing for slots at the airport is dependant on the amount of people they actually land in Vancouver?
 

JayM

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#45
I'll also do this.

The pricing model is retarded and technically this shouldn't be possible.



Or you don't sell a person more apple than he wants to eat for cheaper.
Or the flyer can book with another airline if they don't agree with the terms of passage. It works both ways.
 

Moosedrool

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#48
You have to consent to their terms and conditions in order to buy a ticket. You then buy a ticket and a contract between parties is formed.
I can assure you the T&C's does not say you're legally abided to be on the second leg. It probably says no refunds will be done for failure to board.
 

Aqua_lung

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#49
If you book any airline ticket this is the terms you agree to. You can't expect them not to enforce these terms.
 

JayM

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#50
I can assure you the T&C's does not say you're legally abided to be on the second leg. It probably says no refunds will be done for failure to board.
A simple Google search brought up their condensed conditions of carriage as the first hit.

https://www.lufthansa.com/xx/en/business-terms-and-conditions-1#6

Clause 3.3.3:
If you have chosen a tariff that requires observance of a fixed ticket sequence, please note: if carriage is not used on all individual legs or not used in the sequence specified on the ticket with otherwise unchanged travel data, we will recalculate the airfare according to your altered routing. The airfare will thereby be determined in accordance with the fare you would have had to pay for your actual routing in your price group on the day of your booking. This fare may be higher or lower than the fare you originally paid.
If the price group you originally booked was not available for the altered routing on the day of the booking, the cheapest available former price group for your altered routing will be taken as the basis for the recalculation.
Yes it's scummy, but it's there.
 

Moosedrool

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#51
A simple Google search brought up their condensed conditions of carriage as the first hit.

https://www.lufthansa.com/xx/en/business-terms-and-conditions-1#6

Clause 3.3.3:


Yes it's scummy, but it's there.

I see a way to boycott that system very easily.

Book flights and miss the legs where the direct price would've been less. simply give them unpaid empty seats since their own T&C's say they'll recalculate it if the price is less.

Again I'll have to see how this plays out in court since the hidden city thing shouldn't even be possible. I'm not sure about how the laws in the EU works but without the airliner being a credit provider that shyte wouldn't stick here at all.
 
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JayM

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#52
I see a way to boycott that system very easily.

Book flights and miss the legs where the direct price would've been less. simply give them unpaid empty seats since their own T&C's say they'll recalculate it if the price is less.

Again I'll have to see how this plays out in court since the hidden city thing shouldn't even be possible.
Absolutely, you would be able to sue them for the difference if they don't refund, as per their own CoC.
 

Gordon_R

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#53
A simple Google search brought up their condensed conditions of carriage as the first hit.

https://www.lufthansa.com/xx/en/business-terms-and-conditions-1#6

Clause 3.3.3:


Yes it's scummy, but it's there.
The story is being discussed in aviation forums, since it has worldwide implications. The bottom line is that the airline may or may not win in court, but what they will try to do is blacklist you (they can't recover the money), so that you cannot fly on that airline again, under the same name, or using the same credit card details.

Its a weird story, but has very little relevance for most people on this forum, since we live at the bottom tip of the continent...
 

JayM

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#54
The story is being discussed in aviation forums, since it has worldwide implications. The bottom line is that the airline may or may not win in court, but what they will try to do is blacklist you (they can't recover the money), so that you cannot fly on that airline again, under the same name, or using the same credit card details.

Its a weird story, but has very little relevance for most people on this forum, since we live at the bottom tip of the continent...
I think under most countries' laws an airline could refuse you service for any reason, or no reason at all, other than it being discriminatory in terms of race, gender, religion, disability etc. Perhaps an exception would be if they had a monopoly and it prevented someone from travel altogether.
 

werfie

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#55
Stupid pricing. Thats why people do this.

With Delta:

Jnb > Atl .............. Atl > Jnb = R18500
Jnb > Atl > Nyc ... Atl > Jnb = R12500

R6k cheaper to fly an extra leg.
 

Baise

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#56
More importantly .. who had the time on their hands to realise this guy missed a leg of his journey ..
 

ISP cash cow

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#58
What's the problem? They can't fly direct from Seattle to Oslo, so the only way to get the customer is to route them through their hub. Not as profitable for them as a direct flight to one of their destinations, but they have to give a cost break to get the customer. They just make a little less profit.

Can't see why they're suing this guy though.
Thats the problem. I understand and know that it is not cost effective for an airline to have all direct flights all around the world. hence the reason why the airline will always have a base to which all their flights will fly from out to all the countries around the world and back again to their hub. All they do is connect you onto one flight from seattle to Frankfurt and then the next flight from Frankfurt to Oslo.

Both those flights probably fly every single day to these destinations and back again to Frankfurt hence the reason why they can fly you all around the world.

The problem comes with people doing flights to the base city (In this case Frankfurt) having to buy tickets with a double leg journey to save money.

there is absolutely no way that a flight from "wherever" in the world to Frankfurt is more expensive than "wherever"in the world going to another country via Frankfurt
 

3WA

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#59
Thats the problem. I understand and know that it is not cost effective for an airline to have all direct flights all around the world. hence the reason why the airline will always have a base to which all their flights will fly from out to all the countries around the world and back again to their hub. All they do is connect you onto one flight from seattle to Frankfurt and then the next flight from Frankfurt to Oslo.

Both those flights probably fly every single day to these destinations and back again to Frankfurt hence the reason why they can fly you all around the world.

The problem comes with people doing flights to the base city (In this case Frankfurt) having to buy tickets with a double leg journey to save money.

there is absolutely no way that a flight from "wherever" in the world to Frankfurt is more expensive than "wherever"in the world going to another country via Frankfurt
Like many (all?) businesses, they're not charging you based on what it costs to provide the service. They’re charging you based on what you’re willing to pay. And you’re not willing to pay the same for a connecting flight as you are for a direct flight. So either they discount the connecting flights or don’t get enough customers to be profitable.
 
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