Mecer 2400VA Inverter (Community Support)

PhireSide

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Dec 31, 2006
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Thing is, the way I see it, an inverter solution is almost a waste of money long-term (assuming De Ruyter actually can fix things).

However, going solar/off grid route, seems more financially sound long term. You cut your electricity costs, and add capital value to your home.

Of course, the horrendous up-front costs might be a wee problem...
It really depends on your budget and what you want out of the system.

Even an off-grid system will need some sort of inverter, but you will need to decide how large a system you want to power. A smaller household with few devices and a gas stove/hob and solar geyser in place will need a relatively small setup compared to someone with deep freezers and aircons and things like that.

Patiently waiting for the suppliers and installers to offer financing...I think it's a case of when rather than if, as more and more people contemplate off-grid due to the instability.
 

joshuatree

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Jul 2, 2012
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Interesting but it appears that the Mecer inverter is putting a strain on my batteries, I wonder if its because its on 24/7 for automatic switching when power goes off, but it showed my batteries dropped to 75%, but if I use my cheap non switching inverter, it charges the battery to 100% but I have to do it all manually.
What do you use to charge the batteries when using the standalone "cheap" inverter without changeover?
 

Steamy Tom

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Jan 23, 2019
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I see the side of the battery states Gel, perhaps this would have caused issues? As Champ said too, that cut-off voltage was set too low and probably hurt the cells prematurely.

My folks have a setup with some 24V deep cycle batteries, they had the inverter properly programmed and have been running off the same batteries for 14 years now and estimated battery capacity is still around 80%
14 years? nein bru
 

Lupus

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Apr 25, 2006
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This is the thing. I'm seriously considering getting an inverter set up, but only if it"s "worthwhile". I can handle a couple of inconvenient load shedding time slots, but if this is going to carry on for the nest few months or longer then I will get it.

So, can I rely on Eskom to be unreliable for a while?
Look if my batteries weren't so unreliable I'd use it more again, was helpful last year, which is what more than likely killed the batteries.
 

COMPUTEK

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Apr 7, 2009
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6,253
My problem is with the battery type set to AGM on this Axpert inverter, I cant change the DC cut-off and 10.5V is the default ... to be able to edit that setting I have to change the batt type to "user defined" then I can set it anything from 10-12V
Screenshot_8.jpg

The thing is we use on average 120W and at night time this could go up to 300W max during loadshedding and I dont recall the batteries ever dropping below 12V in a 2½hr loadshed. It's basically ever since that stage 6 time were the batt didn't have time to fully charge between cut-offs that it's giving problems. :mad:

I will edit the settings and put the DC cut-off on 12V, but i think its time to replace batteries unfortunately :crying:
 

Splinter

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Look if my batteries weren't so unreliable I'd use it more again, was helpful last year, which is what more than likely killed the batteries.
Sure, but I'm talking about a situation when load shedding comes to an end (call me gullible if you wish :) )
 

Splinter

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It really depends on your budget and what you want out of the system.

Even an off-grid system will need some sort of inverter, but you will need to decide how large a system you want to power. A smaller household with few devices and a gas stove/hob and solar geyser in place will need a relatively small setup compared to someone with deep freezers and aircons and things like that.

Patiently waiting for the suppliers and installers to offer financing...I think it's a case of when rather than if, as more and more people contemplate off-grid due to the instability.
So what you reckon a medium sized house set-up would cost?
 

GAD

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Nov 9, 2014
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351
OK maybe they have fixed the software. Mine was freaking spinning all the time whether fully charged or not. This was a model from about 4 years ago.
My brother's one did the same but mine is branded the orange colour and stops when fully charged.
 

PhireSide

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Who would you get to do it?
Disclaimer: I am not an expert, not even a n00b in this field, but this is how I would envision my ideal medium home setup:

  • 1x 5kVA pure sine wave inverter/charger with solar input option, R26'000
  • 6x 365w PV panels, R11'000
  • 8x 240Ah 12 batteries, R51'200

  • That leaves you with ~R12'000 for ancillaries like cables, connectors, circuits, charge controllers, brackets and switches
This is just a very rough estimation, and you could probably do it for cheaper or find better suited products. This is assuming you already use gas for cooking and have a gas geyser or solar geyser with no element. You can get DC elements that are kinder to use on inverter systems, but they cost quite a lot and you would need to upsize your inverter by a big margin, driving up costs. The inverter/charger is also overkill, but the brand (Victron Energy) is well known and has really good ratings.
 

Splinter

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Disclaimer: I am not an expert, not even a n00b in this field, but this is how I would envision my ideal medium home setup:

  • 1x 5kVA pure sine wave inverter/charger with solar input option, R26'000
  • 6x 365w PV panels, R11'000
  • 8x 240Ah 12 batteries, R51'200

  • That leaves you with ~R12'000 for ancillaries like cables, connectors, circuits, charge controllers, brackets and switches
This is just a very rough estimation, and you could probably do it for cheaper or find better suited products. This is assuming you already use gas for cooking and have a gas geyser or solar geyser with no element. You can get DC elements that are kinder to use on inverter systems, but they cost quite a lot and you would need to upsize your inverter by a big margin, driving up costs. The inverter/charger is also overkill, but the brand (Victron Energy) is well known and has really good ratings.
Thanks. I don't have gas anywhere in the house, and have pool pump and two aircons. Obviously could change the gas situation. So maybe R150K?

The thing is, this actually starts to look viable when I consider I spend R1000 a month on electricity as is, and electricity is going to go up and up...

PS - sorry for thread derail.
 

PhireSide

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Dec 31, 2006
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Thanks. I don't have gas anywhere in the house, and have pool pump and two aircons. Obviously could change the gas situation. So maybe R150K?

The thing is, this actually starts to look viable when I consider I spend R1000 a month on electricity as is, and electricity is going to go up and up...

PS - sorry for thread derail.
The pool pump alone will be an issue, as the impulse current when they (AC motors) start up are usually too much for an inverter to handle and they can overload and damage the inverter system. I believe that pure sine wave inverters handle it better, but I am no expert - so take my advice with a massive spoonful of salt.

Are your AC units conventional ones or newer inverter units?

If you overspec your batteries and don't discharge them too deeply I am sure you can easily get a decade of service out of them. I so wish I had R200k to throw at this issue (which, to be honest, should be a nonissue in the year 2020 but here we are) to take my home off grid, but living in a complex is really prohibitive in this aspect.

Perhaps my next home - knock R150k off the asking price and put that towards a decent offgrid system and give Eskom the finger :)
 

thechamp

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Feb 26, 2011
Messages
27,210
Disclaimer: I am not an expert, not even a n00b in this field, but this is how I would envision my ideal medium home setup:

  • 1x 5kVA pure sine wave inverter/charger with solar input option, R26'000
  • 6x 365w PV panels, R11'000
  • 8x 240Ah 12 batteries, R51'200

  • That leaves you with ~R12'000 for ancillaries like cables, connectors, circuits, charge controllers, brackets and switches
This is just a very rough estimation, and you could probably do it for cheaper or find better suited products. This is assuming you already use gas for cooking and have a gas geyser or solar geyser with no element. You can get DC elements that are kinder to use on inverter systems, but they cost quite a lot and you would need to upsize your inverter by a big margin, driving up costs. The inverter/charger is also overkill, but the brand (Victron Energy) is well known and has really good ratings.
Substitute the batteries with 7.5kwh Pylon at just under R50k, or any other good brand that is similarly priced.
 

Splinter

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Oct 14, 2011
Messages
23,820
The pool pump alone will be an issue, as the impulse current when they (AC motors) start up are usually too much for an inverter to handle and they can overload and damage the inverter system. I believe that pure sine wave inverters handle it better, but I am no expert - so take my advice with a massive spoonful of salt.

Are your AC units conventional ones or newer inverter units?

If you overspec your batteries and don't discharge them too deeply I am sure you can easily get a decade of service out of them. I so wish I had R200k to throw at this issue (which, to be honest, should be a nonissue in the year 2020 but here we are) to take my home off grid, but living in a complex is really prohibitive in this aspect.

Perhaps my next home - knock R150k off the asking price and put that towards a decent offgrid system and give Eskom the finger :)
I was thinking a bit more about this - the only problem with my logic about viability is that about half the cost seems to be batteries. Which need to be replaced; frequency of this depending on usage and some luck. Hmm.
 
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